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Incarnate Gave Aaron Eckhart A Chance To Have Fun


Aaron Eckhart

He's playing Tom Hanks' copilot in Sully, Miles Teller's boxing coach in Bleed for This and now a maverick exorcist in Incarnate. And he is enjoying the variety. "Early on in my career, I was very much into independent movies," he says. "I wanted to work with my heroes. I was the brooding actor, so it was very important that I stayed away from Hollywood. I did it very deliberately. And I'm glad I did because it made me who I am. But as I've gotten more experience, I feel like I've filled that quotient and I can let myself have fun."

Aaron Eckhart seen on the red carpet for Sully

He says the thing that pushed him out of the serious movie mould was the wordiness of the screenplays he was sent. "I'd gotten to a point where I would get scripts, and it would just be page after page of monologue, monologue, monologue," he laughs. "And I was just like, I don't want to say any more words! My ideal movie now is me on a train, just grunting."

Continue reading: Incarnate Gave Aaron Eckhart A Chance To Have Fun

Bleed For This Review

Good

This is such a ripping true story that it can't help but grab hold of the audience, even if the film never quite breaks through the surface. A story of tenacious triumph in the face of seemingly impossible odds, it also offers Miles Teller a terrific against-type role as a beefy young boxer who simply won't take no for an answer. And the entire cast is just as surprising, adding textures to a movie that's a bit too straightforward for its own good.

This is the story of Vinny Pazienza (Teller), a young boxer who wins two world championships in two weight classes with the help of his father Angelo (Ciaran Hinds) and his trainer Kevin (Aaron Eckhart). Then at the top of his game, he breaks his neck in a car crash and is told he may never walk again, let alone fight. But Vinny is determined to remain the champ, so he returns to training, even though an injury could leave him permanently disabled. Kevin reluctantly agrees to train him, pushing him up into yet another weight class. And seeing the publicity possibilities, father-and-son promoters (Ted Levine and Jordan Gelber) set up a massive Vegas comeback match.

Writer-director Ben Younger shoots this with a steady authenticity, charging inexorably through the story in a way that echoes Vinny's singleminded determination. Along the way, there are strained relationships, a variety of physical and emotional obstacles, intense boxing matches and, of course, a few emotive training montage sequences. The story is so strong that the film can't help but be engaging and even rousing, even if there are very few shadings along the way. Vinny never seems to doubt himself at all, his family only barely objects to his potentially life-threatening decisions, and his opponents are clearly going down for the count.

Continue reading: Bleed For This Review

Bleed For This Trailer


Vinny Paz always had the passion and drive to be the best boxer in which ever division he turned his hand to, he trained rigorously and his whole life revolved around winning the next title. Cheeky in nature Vinny immediately caught the attention of the sporting press earning himself the nickname 'The Pazmanian Devil' for his speed and ability to run circles around his competition in.

Continue: Bleed For This Trailer

Sully Trailer


Chesley Sullenberger has been a pilot all of his adult life. Having had an interest in planes from a young age, Sully decided to join the United States Air Force Academy where he became a 'top flyer' in his class. From his initial position as a cadet, he worked his way up the ranks be become a captain. His astute knowledge of planes was one of the reasons why he was also part of an accident investigation board.

After leaving the air force, he began work at American Airways, whilst also keeping up his interest in aircraft safety. On January 15, 2009 sully began work as usual, travelling to LaGuardia Airport for a flight to Charlotte. The bags were loaded, the passengers seated and the checks completed as it was time for take-off.

As Sully and his co-pilot, Jeff Skiles, initiate the take-off procedure, there was nothing to make either think that this wouldn't be a straightforward shuttle flight. As the wheels took off and the plane lifted from the ground, the plane is suddenly thrown into chaos as a flock of geese fly into the plane and cause serious malfunctions in both engines.

Continue: Sully Trailer

London Has Fallen Review

Weak

It didn't seem possible, but somehow this action movie is even more preposterous than its predecessor, 2013's over-serious Olympus Has Fallen. Gerard Butler is back as a Secret Service agent protecting US President Aaron Eckhart, this time in a Taken-style scenario in which they leave America only to be immediately thrown into the middle of a massive terrorist attack. But the script is so lazy that there isn't a moment when any of this is remotely believable.

Events are put into motion when the British prime minister dies of a heart attack and security services only have a few days to lock down London so that the world's leaders can arrive for the funeral at St Paul's Cathedral. Mike (Butler) flies in with his boss Lynn (Bassett) on Air Force One, accompanying President Asher (Eckhart) and a platoon of bodyguards. Then just before the funeral, a carefully orchestrated series of bombings and gun attacks take out five heads of state. Of course, Mike and Lynn get Asher out of the fray, but an army of bad guys led by terror mastermind Kamran (Waleed Zuaiter) pursue them across the city. Back in Washington, Vice President Trumbull (Morgan Freeman) and the panicky cabinet (including Haley, Forster and Leo) watch all of this unfold on video screens and coordinates a counter-attack.

Even with four screenwriters, the movie makes no real sense. And worse than that, the filmmakers never take advantage of the story's potential or the heavy-hitting cast. There's a line about how all of London's landmarks have been destroyed, but the on-screen destruction is limited to just one of Westminster Abbey's towers. The depiction of world leaders is laughably cliched. And the award-winning actors have nothing to do but stand there looking worried. By contrast, Butler charges around shooting and stabbing everybody who moves in a display of shockingly brutal machismo. Eckhart is more believably reluctant to join in and dispense some violence, but of course he does.

Continue reading: London Has Fallen Review

Aaron Eckhart - Premiere of Focus Features' 'London Has Fallen' held at ArcLight Cinemas Cinerama Dome - Arrivals at ArcLight Cinemas Cinerama Dome - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 1st March 2016

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart - Aaron Eckhart sports a bushy mustache while out in TriBeCa - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 6th October 2015

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart - Aaron Eckhart shopping at Bristol Farms at Bristol Farms - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 2nd September 2015

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart - Aaron Eckhart at Howard Stern.Com to talk about his new movie I,Frankenstein - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 21st January 2014

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart - 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Red Carpet Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 12th January 2014

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart - Gerard Butler and Aaron Eckhart promote their new movie 'Olympus Has Fallen' at the Apple store on Regents street - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 2nd April 2013

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Aaron Eckhart
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Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler
Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler

The Rum Diary Review


Good
Depp's Hunter S Thompson fixation continues with the adaptation of this loosely autobiographical novel. Despite some crazy antics, the film takes an earnest, slightly too-faithful tone that makes it strangely leaden.

In 1960, Kemp (Depp) applies for a job at the San Juan Star in Puerto Rico, working for the sardonic editor Lotterman (Jenkins). He shares a ramshackle flat with photographer Sala (Rispoli), who home-brews super-strong rum with another journalist (Ribisi). While getting slowly pickled, Kemp also gets to know the fast-talking Sanderson (Eckhart), a public relations expert who is using property developers to increase his fortune. Sanderson also has a sexy girlfriend, Chenault (Heard), who immediately catches Kemp's eye. Trouble is brewing everywhere.

Continue reading: The Rum Diary Review

The Rum Diary Trailer


Freelance journalist Paul Kemp decides one day that's he had enough of the hectic lifestyle that the early 1960's New York brings. He moves to Puerto Rico in the Caribbean to take a job at a rundown local newspaper, 'The San Juan Star', run by the equally run down Lotterman.

Continue: The Rum Diary Trailer

Aaron Eckhart Friday 17th June 2011 leaving Bristol Farms with his weekly shop

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart Tuesday 8th March 2011 Battle: Los Angeles Los Angeles Premiere held At Regency Village Theatre Westwood, California

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart Wednesday 28th April 2010 Chanel Tribeca Film Festival Dinner in support of the Tribeca Film Festival Artists Awards Program at Odeon New York City, USA

Aaron Eckhart

Ron Jeremy and Aaron Eckhart - Ron Jeremy and Aaron Eckhart Las Vegas, Nevada - Ron Jeremy hosts an AVN party at Studio 54 inside the MGM Grand Hotel Resort Casino Friday 9th January 2009

Ron Jeremy and Aaron Eckhart
Ron Jeremy
Ron Jeremy
Ron Jeremy
Ron Jeremy
Ron Jeremy

The Dark Knight Review


Excellent
Have you ever noticed how one measly letter separates "laughter" from "slaughter?"

I almost missed this off-the-cuff joke -- it's spray-painted on the side of a semi as the Joker (Heath Ledger) descends on a police convoy hustling doomed district attorney Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart) beneath the streets of Gotham. But it beautifully captures the balancing act director Christopher Nolan attempts in The Dark Knight, an anticipated blockbuster that seems capable at any point of plunging headlong into hilarity or insanity, moral stability or absolute chaos.

Continue reading: The Dark Knight Review

No Reservations Review


Very Good
Amidst the action-adventure blockbusters and schlocky teen horror of summer, we always get, for better or worse, the requisite Hollywood warm-weather date movie. No Reservations may live up to its ancestry, and while that isn't saying a whole lot, it's still a relatively sweet, if predictable and overly slick, romance.

Catherine Zeta-Jones plays Kate, a control-freak chef so tightly wound it's a wonder she doesn't pop in the steam of her kitchen. Despite her position as reigning queen of the Manhattan foodie set, her killer West Village apartment, and the fact that she looks like Catherine Zeta-Jones, Kate is a sad sack; she does not really exist outside of her job and her employer-ordered therapy (Kate also has a temper, see, when anyone, customers included, question her perfection).

Continue reading: No Reservations Review

Conversations With Other Women Review


Excellent
Try to watch director Hans Canosa's Conversations with Other Women twice and in quick succession. The memories that haunt the film's reunited lovers subtly inform every look, line, and gesture between them. For that reason, the film not only stands up to, it demands subsequent viewings if one wants to fully appreciate its layers of double meanings and shaded subtext.

What immediately sets Conversations apart is how, over its 85 minutes, it makes such fun and inventive use of the split-screen technique. The technique's most obvious function is to convey how the story's man and woman (Aaron Eckhart and Helena Bonham Carter), no matter their passion for each other, inhabit disparate and irreconcilable worlds. But it goes brilliantly beyond that, using split-screen also for flashbacks, triggered by memory, in which younger versions of the characters (Erik Eidem and Nora Zehetner), play out the halcyon days of their long-ago romance. What's more, the details of these flashbacks warp and alter, depending on who's doing the remembering. In an intriguing twist, the split-screen projects not only alternate versions of the past, but of the present too -- showing variations on small but important moments either as a character perceives they happened or he/she wishes they had. It's a sensationally expressive use of a tired cinematic device, now revitalized and itself revitalizing a tired genre.

Continue reading: Conversations With Other Women Review

The Black Dahlia Review


Weak
Sure, the man's had a bad run of things. When Brian de Palma directed Snake Eyes, a corker of a plot that went nowhere, it seemed like a fluke. When he did Femme Fatale, that ludicrous sapphic French diamond heist flick, it could be written off as just an idiosyncratic minor joke by a former Hollywood heavyweight in self-imposed Euro-exile -- something to keep him occupied until he went back to the big leagues. Well, that moment of return finally arrived in the form of the long-gestating adaptation of James Ellroy's 1987 novel The Black Dahlia, a mystery about the infamous 1947 Elizabeth Short murder which seemed purpose-built for de Palma's needs. Ellroy's fever dream of a novel has everything that the famously self-referential director could utilize: doppelgangers (male and female), seedy urban underbelly, and psychosexual perversities galore. Given the limp, campy joke of a film that resulted, however, it seems time to stop making excuses for the man -- Brian de Palma has become one very bad director.

The generally limp script by Josh Friedman starts off smartly, setting us up for the bruising friendship between the stars, a couple of L.A. cops who also happen to be boxers and get paired up for a publicity-machine fight that touts them as "Mr. Fire and Mr. Ice." Ice is "Bucky" Bleichart (Josh Hartnett), a cool and low-key guy charitably described as a loser who gets his shot at a good chunk of change as well as reassignment to the LAPD's hotshot Warrants department for agreeing to the fight. Fire is Lee Blanchard (Aaron Eckhart), one of those bigger-than-life cops who cuts corners with aplomb and seems happy enough to bring Bucky on as his partner after knocking his teeth out (literally) in the ring. Further binding the two men together, besides work and friendship, is Kay Lake (Scarlett Johansson), the sultry blonde dame on Lee's arm who takes a shine to Bleichart that doesn't seem to be entirely platonic.

Continue reading: The Black Dahlia Review

Thank You For Smoking Review


Excellent
Striding up alongside such great anti-heroes as Tony Soprano and Scarface comes Nick Naylor, a silver-tongued lobbyist with such a tremendous gift for gab that he actually successfully defends the tobacco industry. And as much as you probably think cigarette makers are evil, you'll find yourself - as with all anti-heroes - actually rooting for this scumbag.

Why? Well, besides star Aaron Eckhart's flawlessly sumptuous performance as Naylor, I'll just quote a line from Naylor himself: "The beauty of argument is that if you argue correctly, you're never wrong." In the end, Nick Naylor is not just right; he's unquestionably the most passionate, most seductive man on the screen, and everyone else just looks limp and dull beside him.

Continue reading: Thank You For Smoking Review

Thursday Review


Good
A definite sleeper, not for the faint of heart. Thursday features 24 hours in the life of a reformed drug dealer, who has been trying to put his life in order for the last four years. When his old partner rolls into town and drops a load of smack in his L.A. house, all manner of nefarious sorts stop by to collect it. Body count ensues, plus Paulina Porizkova in (and out of) a red, rubber dress. I'll buy that for a dollar.

Suspect Zero Review


Weak
I suspect that zero is moderately close to the number of viewers who will be impressed with Suspect Zero. Another by-the-book serial killer thriller that uses David Fincher's Seven as its guide, Zero takes a clever premise and buries it beneath layers of substandard detective clichés and crude camera tricks meant to deceive us. It's so desperate to keep us in the dark for as long as physically possible that it finally begins to lose its own way.

The mouse in this stock cat and mouse game is disgraced FBI agent Thomas Mackelway (Aaron Eckhart), a dedicated G-man with a high-profile blemish on his service record. His grievous error on a previous case earned him a demotion to the Bureau's dead-end Albuquerque office, though it's not long before Mackelway's hot on the trail of another cold-blooded killer. This wandering murderer (Ben Kingsley) exhibits no motive and establishes no pattern to his killings, but enjoys faxing Mackelway clues to drag the investigator deeper into a series of perplexing mind games.

Continue reading: Suspect Zero Review

The Core Review


Weak
The Core is Armageddon inside the Earth. If you've caught the trailer, spotted the revealing poster, or even overheard a total stranger briefly mentioning the plot in mixed company, then you've figured this much already. What's most distressing is that The Core is Armageddon without a heart to dangle from its sleeves. Michael Bay's bombastic endeavor may have choked itself on chest-heaving male bonding and fist-pumping patriotism, but at least it gave a damn. Here, we're going through the motions.

When the core of our planet stops spinning on its axis - a reason is given, though it makes little sense - a motley crew of hastily-trained scientists must accompany two astronauts (Bruce Greenwood, Hilary Swank) to the Earth's center so they can jump-start our globe using nuclear weapons.

Continue reading: The Core Review

Nurse Betty Review


Excellent
Neil LaBute, best known for his ultra-dark comedies In the Company of Men and Your Friends and Neighbors, breaks from his traditional mold and lightens up a tad with Nurse Betty, which -- again -- isn't going to win any awards for sensitivity.

For the first time, LaBute is not directing from his own script, which might explain why, if I didn't know better, I would have sworn I was watching a Coen brothers movie. Who else would put a fantasy dancing sequence on the edge of the Grand Canyon at night?

Continue reading: Nurse Betty Review

Paycheck Review


OK
Sci-fi fans will see clear similarities between John Woo's action/thriller Paycheck and Paul Verhoeven's Total Recall (1991). Both deal with memory and identity, as adapted from stories by author Philip K. Dick. Both star thousand-watt Hollywood celebrities (Ben Affleck here, Governor Schwarzenegger in Recall) in roles that ask little from them. And, most disappointingly, both shun an intellectual and sturdy drama that would fit the subject matter perfectly, choosing action and cornball dialogue instead.

"My life is nothing but highlights," confesses Mike Jennings (Affleck), a genius computer hacker who trades big cash for small chunks of his own memory. Jennings gets rich by dissecting massive programs and passing the goods onto rival companies - at which point, all recent activity is erased from his brain.

Continue reading: Paycheck Review

Possession Review


Bad
A.S. Byatt's Booker Award-winning novel Possession might have provided some literary delight, following two academics who track the love letters of a Victorian poet and his free-spirited mistress. That doesn't translate well to cinema, though. Neil LaBute's film adaptation boils down to a buttoned-down Gwyneth Paltrow (sporting her Academy Award winning faux-Brit accent from Shakespeare in Love) and square-jawed Aaron Eckhart running from one Masterpiece Theater location to the next (the library, the moors, the waterfall, the gothic archway, the castle wall, and the moonlit graveyard) all the while reading aloud from the correspondence of dead Englishmen.

While it might make a charming book-on-tape for the Oprah crowd, this "love loves to love love" hokum masquerades as a real movie. The present day academics exist in counterpoint to the period movie flashbacks (basically Jeremy Northam donning his suit again and looking forlorn, intercut with shots of his beautiful mistress Jennifer Ehle looking voluptuous and forlorn). And they talk, talk, talk about subtext within the letters; but they're actually talking about each other. Yes, it's When Harry Met Sally in the Library. So help me God, Eckhart's emotional revelation is when he asks Paltrow, "Is there an Us in You and Me?" (If I were Paltrow, I'd say, "I'll call you.")

Continue reading: Possession Review

Any Given Sunday Review


Good

There's only about 22 minutes of plot in "Any Given Sunday," Oliver Stone's innovative, bone-crunching ballet of sound and fury football, so lets get that out of the way right now:

Al Pacino stars as the embattled, old-school coach of a fictitious pro football team. Cameron Diaz, is the willful, profit-zealous daughter of the franchise's recently deceased owner. Jamie Foxx is a hotshot young quarterback whose know-it-all attitude and colossal ego threaten team unity. He's just replaced the injured, aging, Elway-esque veteran QB Dennis Quaid, whose compound back injury has spelled curtains for his career -- if only his ruthlessly ambitious, harpy of a wife (Lauren Holly) would accept that fact.

During the last two minutes of the fourth quarter of the Big Playoff Game that serves as the film's climax, each of these characters (especially the selfish ones) will have an epiphany about what's really important in their lives.

Continue reading: Any Given Sunday Review

The Core Review


Unbearable

It would be a terrible shame if talented actors like Stanley Tucci, Delroy Lindo and Alfre Woodard have reached a point where money trumps professional pride. But I can't imagine any other reason they'd sign on to a half-witted, obscenely formulaic, huge-budget save-the-Earth sci-fi embarrassment like "The Core."

Almost exactly the same movie as "Armageddon" -- and almost as insufferable -- it features a handful of good-looking scientists and NASA astronauts who, instead of going into space to set off a nuke and save the world from a asteroid, travel to the center of the Earth to set off a nuke, thus restarting the dying molten core and saving the world from electromagnetic disaster.

The exact same shopworn characters die in the exact same order, some accidentally, some heroically to save the mission. The simplest laws of physics and even plain-as-day physical facts are utterly ignored (the nuke-the-core plan is based on two-dimensional thinking even though the Earth is -- duh! -- a sphere).

Continue reading: The Core Review

Aaron Eckhart

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Aaron Eckhart

Date of birth

12th March, 1968

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83




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Aaron Eckhart Movies

Bleed for This Movie Review

Bleed for This Movie Review

This is such a ripping true story that it can't help but grab hold of...

Bleed For This Trailer

Bleed For This Trailer

Vinny Paz always had the passion and drive to be the best boxer in which...

Sully Trailer

Sully Trailer

Chesley Sullenberger has been a pilot all of his adult life. Having had an interest...

London Has Fallen Movie Review

London Has Fallen Movie Review

It didn't seem possible, but somehow this action movie is even more preposterous than its...

London Has Fallen Trailer

London Has Fallen Trailer

Gerard Butler, Morgan Freeman, Aaron Eckhart and Angela Bassett once again team up in the...

I, Frankenstein Movie Review

I, Frankenstein Movie Review

Even with its relentlessly cliched production design (trenchcoats and flickering candles galore), this raucous gothic...

I, Frankenstein Trailer

I, Frankenstein Trailer

Adam is the original creature created by Dr. Frankenstein 200 years ago and has taken...

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Olympus Has Fallen Movie Review

Olympus Has Fallen Movie Review

As this massive blockbuster thriller progresses, it's impossible not to become amused by how ridiculous...

Erased Trailer

Erased Trailer

Ben Logan is a seemingly well-respected former CIA operative working at Halgate Security Systems. His...

Olympus Has Fallen Trailer

Olympus Has Fallen Trailer

President of the United States Benjamin Asher has had enough trauma while being in office,...

The Rum Diary Movie Review

The Rum Diary Movie Review

Depp's Hunter S Thompson fixation continues with the adaptation of this loosely autobiographical novel. Despite...

The Rum Diary Trailer

The Rum Diary Trailer

Freelance journalist Paul Kemp decides one day that's he had enough of the hectic lifestyle...

Battle Los Angeles Movie Review

Battle Los Angeles Movie Review

So po-faced that it almost feels like a spoof, this energetic action epic is watchable...

Rabbit Hole Movie Review

Rabbit Hole Movie Review

After two iconic films (Hedwig and Shortbus), Mitchell deploys his distinctive directorial style to adapt...

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