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Vinnie Pazienza Boxing Biopic Recruits Aaron Eckhart And Miles Teller


Miles Teller Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart and Miles Teller are both set to star in a new boxing biopic based on the life of world champion Vinny Pazienza. The project is called Bleed for This and Martin Scorsese will oversee as executive producer. Pazienza’s story is ripe for feature film adaption.

Miles TellerMiles Teller is set for the biggest role of his career

After a near-fatal car crash, the boxer was faced with never walking again, let alone boxing again. Instead of giving in and living a life away from the sport he loved, Pazienza defied doctor’s orders, embarking on a remarkable comeback under the tutelage of renown trainer, Kevin Rooney.

Continue reading: Vinnie Pazienza Boxing Biopic Recruits Aaron Eckhart And Miles Teller

'I, Frankenstein' Falls Over At Box Office, 'Ride Along' Speeds Ahead [Trailer]


Aaron Eckhart Ice Cube Kevin Hart

The latest Hollywood incarnation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein legend, I, Frankenstein, has flopped at the US box office, coming in sixth place on its debut weekend. The dark new action thriller, which shares its producers with the gloomy, supernatural Underworld movies, sees actor Aaron Eckhart take on the lead role.

I, Frankenstein Aaron Eckhart
New Aaron Eckhart Movie 'I, Frankenstein' Has Failed To Drum Up Much Interest At The US Box Office.

Despite an enduringly popular premise and a world-renowned story, the Stuart Beattie-directed I, Frankenstein has failed to coax American audiences towards its cinema screens over the weekend, taking $8.3m (£5m); a modest sum in comparison to the $65m (£39.3m) it cost to make the film, according to BBC News.

Continue reading: 'I, Frankenstein' Falls Over At Box Office, 'Ride Along' Speeds Ahead [Trailer]

Box Office Reflects Critics Views On 'I, Frankenstein'


Aaron Eckhart

The Box office response to I, Frankenstein has mirrored the critics. The film has failed on its opening day to inspire audiences in the US and, despite expectations from the film's studio and producers, failed to reach the top of the US Box Office Chart on Friday (24th January). 

I, Frankenstein, which opened on Friday, gained $2.8 million and it looks as though it may struggle to meet its $68 million production cost. It does appear surprising as the film boasts an expert special effects team and a strong cast. However critics were unimpressed with the film's script and the poor acting evident throughout. 

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart stars in I, Frankenstein.

Continue reading: Box Office Reflects Critics Views On 'I, Frankenstein'

'I, Frankenstein' Fails To Raise Critics' Pulses


Aaron Eckhart Frankenstein Bill Nighy Yvonne Strahovski Miranda Otto Aden Young Caitlin Stasey

I, Frankenstein, the latest adaptation of Mary Shelley's classic novel, has been crushed by critics and no electrical cables or extra body parts seem likely to rebuild its reputation.

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart stars as Adam, Frankenstein's monster.

The creators of the Underworld saga have contributed to this supernatural monstrosity, which is hardly surprising considering the standards of the latter movies in that particular franchise. The film is based on the graphic novel of the same name by Kevin Grevioux which places Frankenstein's monster in an alternative present day where gargoyles and demons struggle for dominance. 

Continue reading: 'I, Frankenstein' Fails To Raise Critics' Pulses

Now That 'Olympus Has Fallen,' It's London's Turn In The Sequel


Morgan Freeman Gerard Butler Aaron Eckhart

If you thought Olympus Has Fallen was bad, then wait until you heard this: the brainiacs at Millennium Films have decided a sequel is in order, and will move the action over to the U.K in London Has Fallen.

The news of a sequel was broken by ScreenDaily, who say the story surrounds "a plot to strike the city during the funeral of the British Prime Minister. Only the President Of The United States, his secret service head and an English MI6 agent can save the day.”

Despite IGN giving Olympus a 7.5 out of 10 – desperately wanting an action film so much so they dreamed a good one up – most of the critics agreed it was a pretty rotten film, culminating in a 48% rating from 178 reviews.

Continue reading: Now That 'Olympus Has Fallen,' It's London's Turn In The Sequel

I, Frankenstein Trailer


Adam is the original creature created by Dr. Frankenstein 200 years ago and has taken on his maker's surname having been mourning his death for so long. He now returns to society having been hidden away in the North Pole for the last two centuries and finds that he is stronger than any other lifeform on the planet. However, he soon finds himself embroiled in a deadly battle between two different immortal forces of the world that are determined to take over the planet. Adam wants to save the human race that he was born into and that once showed him mercy, but how can he when he's one guy against so many unstoppable beings who are determined to destroy him no matter what?

'I, Frankenstein' is the thrilling fantasy adventure written and directed by Stuart Beattie ('Tomorrow, When the War Began', 'Australia', '30 Days of Night') and based on the as yet unpublished graphic novel by Kevin Grevioux. It acts as a sequel to the original 1818 gothic novel 'Frankenstein' by Mary Shelley, bringing Frankenstein's monster into a modern society that is under threat by more of his own kind. The film is set to be released in the UK on January 24th 2014.

Click Here To Read - I, Frankenstein Movie Review

Video - Aaron Eckhart Talks About The Themes Of New Flick 'I, Frankenstein' At Comic-Con Screening


Aaron Eckhart talks about his new movie 'I, Frankenstein' - a modern take on the classic Mary Shelley story that was turned into a graphic novel - at Comic-Con ahead of the unveiling of some new footage.

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Aaron Eckhart and Mary McCormack - JDRF LA's 10th Annual Finding A Cure: The Love Story Gala - Century City, California, United Kingdom - Saturday 4th May 2013

Aaron Eckhart and Mary Mccormack
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart - JDRF LA's 10th Annual Finding A Cure: The Love Story Gala - Century City, California, United States - Sunday 5th May 2013

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart and Mary Mccormack
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos - Celebrities at The Grove to appear on entertainment news show 'Extra' - Los Angeles, Hollywood, United States - Tuesday 30th April 2013

Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos

Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos - Aaron Eckhart at The Grove for an interview with Mario Lopez for television show 'Extra' - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 30th April 2013

Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Menounos

Olympus Has Fallen Review


Good

As this massive blockbuster thriller progresses, it's impossible not to become amused by how ridiculous its script becomes. Because the production values are first-rate, with mammoth set pieces, rampant destruction and elaborate stunt action. Meanwhile, the plot and dialog are comically inane, to the point where knowing audience members start giggling helplessly. And frankly, these viewers will enjoy the film a lot more than anyone who tries to take it seriously.

The film opens with a harrowing scene in which Secret Service agent Mike (Butler) saves the President (Echkart) from an accident in which the First Lady (Judd) dies. So he's transferred to office duty, and now only keeps an eye on the White House from across the road. But this is how he spots a fringe group of radical Koreans launch an assault. Led by nutcase Kang (Yune) they storm the Oval Office and take the President, Defense Secretary (Leo) and others hostage. As Mike tries to break them free, he stays in touch with the temporary command centre at the Pentagon, where top dogs (including Freeman, Forster and Bassett) attempt to keep the menace from spreading.

But of course, these officials are useless, and it'll be up to Mike to save the day on his own, Die Hard-style. Improbably, all of his old access codes and passwords still work, so he's able to sneak around the White House and take out the villains one by one. Butler turns out to be rather good in this kind of meathead role, combining Bruce Willis' wit with Sylvester Stallone's brawn. By contrast, everyone else pretty much just sits around saying ridiculous things like, "Oh my God, we're doomed!" At least Leo gets to show some backbone.

Continue reading: Olympus Has Fallen Review

Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler - 'Olympus Has Fallen' UK film premiere held at the BFI IMax - Inside Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 3rd April 2013

Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler
Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler
Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler
Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler

Aaron Eckhart, Gerard Butler and Alan Siegel - 'Olympus Has Fallen' UK film premiere held at the BFI IMax - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 3rd April 2013

Aaron Eckhart, Gerard Butler and Alan Siegel
Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler
Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart - Los Angeles Premiere of 'Olympus Has Fallen' held at ArcLight Hollywood Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 18th March 2013

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart Thursday 13th October 2011 'The Rum Diary' premiere held at the LACMA Bing Theater - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Video - Aaron Eckhart Leaving Bristol Farms Supermarket


Aaron Eckhart, the American actor and star of 'Batman: The Dark Knight', leaves Bristol Farms supermarket in Los Angeles with several bags of groceries. The famously private Eckhart donned brown brogues, smart jeans and a large green overcoat for his shopping trip.

The 43-year-old, who starred alongside NICOLE KIDMAN in the recent drama 'Rabbit Hole', recently completed work on 'The Rum Diary' with JOHNNY DEPP. Based on HUNTER S THOMPSON's classic book, the movie follows freelance journalist Paul Kemp who writes for a run-down newspaper in the Caribbean

Battle Los Angeles Review


Good
So po-faced that it almost feels like a spoof, this energetic action epic is watchable due to its solid cast and visceral tone. And the story and characters are so thin that you almost admire the filmmakers' nerve.

Staff-Sergeant Nantz (Eckhart) is retiring from the Marines on the day of an alien attack on 12 major cities. A shady past means his new troops don't trust him, including the expectant father (Ramon Rodriguez), the shell-shocked guy (Parrack), the buddies (Pesi and Ne-Yo), the bitter one (Hardrict), the bright young thing (Rothhaar), the virgin (Fisher) and the foreigner (M'Cormack). As the assault hits Santa Monica, they're sent to rescue trapped civilians (including Pena and Moynahan). They also team up with an Air Force officer (Michelle Rodriguez) to find a weakness in the alien defence.

Continue reading: Battle Los Angeles Review

Aaron Eckhart - Sunday 20th February 2011 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Beverly Hills, California

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Rabbit Hole Review


Extraordinary
After two iconic films (Hedwig and Shortbus), Mitchell deploys his distinctive directorial style to adapt Lindsay-Abaire's play for the big screen. And he brings a remarkably light tough to the heavy subject matter, creating a film that deeply moves us.

Becca and Howie (Kidman and Eckhart) are a wealthy couple in the New York suburbs, but their life is coloured by intense grief after the accidental death of their 4-year-old son. Unable to move on, they struggle to integrate their loss into their daily routine, attending group-counselling sessions that Becca can't bear due to other parents' religious platitudes. Meanwhile, her mother (Wiest) and sister (Blanchard) add both comfort and stress, and Becca's chance encounter with the teen (Teller) who was driving the fateful car sparks her to take unusual action.

Continue reading: Rabbit Hole Review

Aaron Eckhart - Saturday 8th January 2011 at Palm Springs Convention Center Palm Springs, California

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Rabbit Hole Trailer


Becca And Howie Corbett have a perfect life, they live in a nice house with their son Danny and their dog. When Danny runs out of the garden and is hit by a car their existence is thrown into turmoil. Struggling to deal with the loss, the couple find very different ways of dealing with their pain.

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Aaron Eckhart Tuesday 21st December 2010 Aaron Eckhart shopping for shoes at Barneys Of New York in Beverly Hills. Los Angeles, California

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Battle: Los Angeles Trailer


How do you defeat an enemy you know nothing about and never planned to fight? When earth is attacked by extraterrestrials, one by one cities begin to fall and the world becomes a very different place to the one we know today.

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Aaron Eckhart and Nicole Kidman - Aaron Eckhart and Nicole Kidman New York City, USA - 'Meet the Filmmakers' event for the new film 'Rabbit Hole' at the Apple Soho Store Friday 3rd December 2010

Aaron Eckhart and Nicole Kidman

Aaron Eckhart, Nicole Kidman and Sandra Oh - Aaron Eckhart, Nicole Kidman and Sandra Oh New York City, USA - New York premiere of 'Rabbit Hole' held at the Paris Theatre - Arrivals Thursday 2nd December 2010

Aaron Eckhart, Nicole Kidman and Sandra Oh
Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart, Nicole Kidman and Sandra Oh
Guests and Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart, Nicole Kidman and Sandra Oh
Aaron Eckhart, Nicole Kidman and Sandra Oh

Aaron Eckhart Thursday 2nd December 2010 New York premiere of 'Rabbit Hole' held at the Paris Theatre - Outside Arrivals New York City, USA

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart and CNN Saturday 20th November 2010 2010 CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute held at the Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Aaron Eckhart and Cnn
Aaron Eckhart and Cnn
Aaron Eckhart and Cnn

Aaron Eckhart - Monday 25th October 2010 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Beverly Hills, California

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart Saturday 16th October 2010 Spike TV's 'Scream 2010 Awards' at the Greek Theater - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart Adriana M. Barraza / "2#115#Source="

Aaron Eckhart

Aaron Eckhart Friday 15th October 2010 Esquire Celebrates The Grand Opening of Esquire House LA held at Esquire House LA Los Angeles, California

Aaron Eckhart and Nicole Kidman - Aaron Eckhart and Nicole Kidman Toronto, Canada - The 35th Toronto International Film Festival - 'Rabbit Hole' press conference held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Tuesday 14th September 2010

Aaron Eckhart and Nicole Kidman
Aaron Eckhart and Nicole Kidman
Aaron Eckhart and Nicole Kidman
Aaron Eckhart

Love Happens Trailer


Watch the trailer for Love Happens

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Towelhead Review


Very Good
It's possible that Alan Ball will never quite grow up. And after seeing his directorial debut Towelhead, people may never want him to -- those that stay until the final credits roll, at least.

The advance word percolating out of festivals was that Ball's adaptation of Alicia Erian's novel of sexual and racial angst in the suburbs during the Gulf War was just shy of a disaster. Shocking, in-your-face, inappropriate, the rumors said, and not in a good way. An indie film community, that just a few years ago would have embraced this film as a brave slap in conformity's face, was now seeming to turn its collective back. Some of the advance negativity was well-informed, at least about Ball. This is a wildly manipulative and immature film, a sort of adolescent fever dream looking to tick off as many taboos as possible. But amidst the campy twists and unbelievable outbursts there can also be felt an indefinable honesty; something in far shorter supply these days than mere outrage.

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No Reservations, Exclusive Clip


No Reservations
Exclusive Clip

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No Reservations Trailer


No Reservations
trailer

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Conversations With Other Women Review


Excellent
Try to watch director Hans Canosa's Conversations with Other Women twice and in quick succession. The memories that haunt the film's reunited lovers subtly inform every look, line, and gesture between them. For that reason, the film not only stands up to, it demands subsequent viewings if one wants to fully appreciate its layers of double meanings and shaded subtext. What immediately sets Conversations apart is how, over its 85 minutes, it makes such fun and inventive use of the split-screen technique. The technique's most obvious function is to convey how the story's man and woman (Aaron Eckhart and Helena Bonham Carter), no matter their passion for each other, inhabit disparate and irreconcilable worlds. But it goes brilliantly beyond that, using split-screen also for flashbacks, triggered by memory, in which younger versions of the characters (Erik Eidem and Nora Zehetner), play out the halcyon days of their long-ago romance. What's more, the details of these flashbacks warp and alter, depending on who's doing the remembering. In an intriguing twist, the split-screen projects not only alternate versions of the past, but of the present too -- showing variations on small but important moments either as a character perceives they happened or he/she wishes they had. It's a sensationally expressive use of a tired cinematic device, now revitalized and itself revitalizing a tired genre.Conversations opens as a wedding reception at a posh New York City hotel winds down. A man and woman -- each alone, bored, slightly drunk -- strike up a conversation. Their manner is flirtatious, but the back-and-forth is barbed with sarcastic half-truths, and, at least from the woman's side, with the thorns of years-old grievances. The woman, we learn, was one of the bridesmaids. She's traveled here from London where she has a well-to-do cardiologist husband and three children waiting for her. The man has a 22-year-old girlfriend back at home, but he isn't sweating it; we get the sense he's had many a 22-year-old girlfriend waiting on him at one time or another. Rather, he's more taken with the woman, who's clearly more than a passing fancy.The two don't have much time; the woman's flight leaves at dawn. They repair to her hotel room where their bittersweet, often humorous verbal dance continues with a break for the inevitable catch-up sex. On the page, this all sounds corny. But, as remembrances layer one upon the other, this relationship takes on the darkness and depth of an epic love. Screenwriter Gabrielle Zavin freshens up stale love story conventions, and does so the right way: By creating distinct, well rounded characters. We piece together, bit by bit, the circumstances of the woman fleeing their troubled affair for safe harbor in London, and what perhaps followed in the years following their breakup. At times, Zavin's scenes can feel stagy and amateurish, forcing her characters from one beat to another as each seeks to fill the decade-plus gap since they were last together.Luckily, she's got Canosa's playful direction and two exceedingly likeable performers in Eckhart and Bonham Carter to help smooth out the crimps in her script. Eckhart works away his characters' mischievous charm till, tentatively, the man's emotional wounds begin to bare and bleed. To my mind, this is also the worthiest part Bonham Carter's had since 1997's The Wings of the Dove, and here she reminds us what an engaging dramatic presence she can be, and that she holds her own with today's best screen actors.Like Richard Linklater's Before Sunset and André Téchiné's Changing Times, Conversations is actually interested in the joys and pains of human relationships. Each of these films is about sensitive, intelligent adults negotiating with that least selfish of human ideals: Eternal Love. In every significant way, these films are rare gems in an age of impersonal, cookie-cutter filmmaking, a soothing salve for blockbuster-bruised cinemagoers starved, like Conversations' own lovers, for something real and substantial.Why would you talk to another woman anyway?

Molly Review


Bad
Decidedly dumb, this ripoff of Flowers for Algernon has Elisabeth Shue playing the unlikely autism victim who miraculously gains intelligence and bionic powers like super-hearing after an experimental operation -- only to see said powers fade away over time. Shue's acting is atrocious, rivaled only by the idiocy of the story itself. See also At First Sight.

Any Given Sunday Review


Very Good
Football is as engrained in our society's mores as deeply as war, family values, and politics -- at least that's what Oliver Stone would like you to believe. To back up this statement, Any Given Sunday analyzes the effects of a culture that elevates professional athletes and coaches to a plateau where they are immortalized as heroes of the common man. Stone's football fairytale is a culmination of every anecdote, highlight, or soundbite you've ever seen associated with the pigskin, wrapped up in an aesthetically pleasing Christmas package, and sealed with a kiss from team owner Cameron Diaz. Stone aims to please, and he doesn't miss a single cliché of the revered and scrutinized American athlete.

At its core, Any Given Sunday is the story of Miami Sharks coach Tony D'Amato (Al Pacino - The Godfather, Dog Day Afternoon) and his two quarterbacks, Willie Beamen (Jamie Foxx - The Great White Hype, Booty Call) and Cap Rooney (Dennis Quaid - The Big Easy, Innerspace). The quarterback is the most vital position in the game. He is the team spokesperson and field chief, and he serves as a crucial link between coaches, administration, and players. When legendary two-time Pantheon Cup (aka: Super Bowl) champion Cap Bowman ruptures a disk after a bone crushing hit, coach Tony is left with Willie Beamen (Foxx), an athletic, yet untested QB. His team has lost four straight and appears to be plummeting in a downward spiral with the playoffs right around the corner. He's got delusional team owner Christina Pagniacci (Cameron Diaz) and sports analyst Jack Rose (John McGinley, doing his best Jim Rome impersonation) breathing down his neck because of his outdated coaching style, and a team of players he's losing control of.

Continue reading: Any Given Sunday Review

The Missing Review


OK
Is there a role Cate Blanchett cannot convincingly play? As the tent pole of Ron Howard's drawn-out period thriller The Missing, the Oscar nominee assumes the physical, spiritual, and emotional confidence of a pioneer woman who must simultaneously play caretaker, healer, and rough-rider. We don't laugh when Maggie bakes in one scene and brandishes a shotgun in the next. That's life on the frontier, and Blanchett - a proper Aussie - looks like she could hop in that saddle and ride with the best of them.

If only Howard and screenwriter Ken Kaufman could pony up a story worthy of Cate's efforts. Working from Thomas Eidson's novel, Kaufman has penned an abduction case that plays out along a surprisingly linear course. Any time he attempts to branch out in a valuable subplot - whether exploring the ineffective nature of authority in the Wild West, or staging one of many dramatic escape sequences - he does so without confidence. Missing occasionally teases us with relevant character and plot development, then rapidly turns tail and scurries back to the central pursuit story, a slender narrative that can't hold our interest for the film's elongated 147-minute run time.

Continue reading: The Missing Review

In The Company Of Men Review


Extraordinary
Yikes! Turning the tables on political correctness, affirmative action, and especially, the feminist movement, never seemed so fun on film! In the Company of Men teaches you that everything you know is wrong and slaps you in the face for enjoying it. This phenomenal gem is, on the surface, a simple tale about two jilted male co-workers, who, on a six-week long business trip, decide to take revenge on all the females of the species by jointly finding a "corn-fed" wallflower, making feel like she's a beauty queen, then dumping her like a sack of bricks. Hard. Chad (Aaron Eckhart) is the smooth one. Howard (Matt Malloy) is a lovable Winnie the Pooh type. Together, they're devastating... until "the game" ends up having unpredictable effects on the both of them, as well as Christine (Stacy Edwards), their deaf victim. Unpredictable and wholly unique, In the Company of Men is a powerful moviegoing experience. Take my advice, and watch it with someone you love.

Continue reading: In The Company Of Men Review

The Pledge Review


Excellent
An early note to parents with young, blonde daughters: Think twice about seeing The Pledge, and if you must go -- if you're eager to see Jack Nicholson give one of his best cinematic performances ever -- then take a Valium before entering the theater and practice saying, "This won't happen to my family! This won't happen to my family!"

From the opening shot, where we see the top of Nicholson's half-bald, hair-transplanted head, The Pledge is an exercise in stomaching an ugly truth. Body parts, pony-tailed girls splotched with blood and bruises -- this isn't a film about happy endings and human triumph. Suspected sex perverts lurk down every road in The Pledge, causing Nicholson's character, a retired homicide detective, so much angst that he becomes his own worst enemy.

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Your Friends And Neighbors Review


Good
What does anyone in Hollywood know? You can make a movie with absolutely no likeable characters.

Neil LaBute does exactly that with this highly anticipated follow-up to In the Company of Men, a film so anti-humanity it's practically a sequel.

Continue reading: Your Friends And Neighbors Review

Erin Brockovich Review


Very Good
Besides having the hardest-to-type title of a movie since Being John Malcovich, what will be the legacy of Erin Brockovich, an unabashed Julia Roberts star vehicle that, coincidentally, also tells the story of the largest direct-action legal settlement in American history?

It won't be for its aura of jurisprudence. As a primer on the U.S. legal system, Erin Brockovich is not terribly compelling. The legal mumbo-jumbo is all there and feels accurate enough, but the heart of the movie simply doesn't rest with the details of the case, which features Pacific Gas & Electric poisoning 600 people in a small California town with chromium (and then telling them it's good for them).

Continue reading: Erin Brockovich Review

Erin Brockovich Review


Good

Sporting a back-combed, two-tone mane, spike-heeled Candies and the wardrobe of a trailer park tart, Julia Roberts has somehow never been more appealing and charismatic than she is as "Erin Brockovich."

The heroine of inventive auteur Stephen Soderbergh's latest Hollywood-deconstructing dynamo, Brockovich is real-life law office file clerk who in 1993 rallied a small desert town against the Goliath public utility that had for decades knowingly poisoned its water supply.

Brazen, tactless and utterly magnetic in Roberts' increasingly talented hands, this struggling single mom is short on job skills and long on lip. She starts the movie in the middle of a frustrating job hunt in which she keeps giving interviewers a piece of her mind.

Continue reading: Erin Brockovich Review

Suspect Zero Review


OK

Here we go again with another brooding-cop-vs.-serial-killer cat-and-mouse thriller. So what makes "Suspect Zero" any different from "Taking Lives, " "Twisted," "Murder By Numbers," "Along Came a Spider," "The Watcher," "The Bone Collector," "Kiss the Girls, "Copycat,", "Se7en," etc., etc.?

Well, just enough to keep it interesting -- but not enough to make it memorable.

The story this time: Having recently botched a case in which a killer was set free on a technicality, FBI agent Tom Mackelway (Aaron Eckhart) has been banished to the backwaters of Albuquerque -- but it seems another killer has followed him there. Within days of his arrival, two bodies turn up with their eyelids cut off, the handiwork of a nutcase named Benjamin O'Ryan (Ben Kingsley) who keeps leaving taunting clues addressed to our hero.

Continue reading: Suspect Zero Review

Nurse Betty Review


Good

Heretofore known for his viciously incisive, very black socio-sexual satires, director Neil LaBute takes a joyride in antic comedy territory with "Nurse Betty." It's charming effort of pure entertainment about a gentle, bouncy Kansas waitress who becomes convinced she's a part of her favorite soap opera after being sent into post-traumatic shock by witnessing a murder.

The murder was that of her abusive, redneck husband (LaBute regular Aaron Eckhart in another amazing chameleon performance) -- a retribution for a shady business deal gone wrong.

The waitress, Betty Sizemore, is the kind of bona fide wide-eyed innocent most Hollywood actresses wouldn't be able to play without slipping into a hammy, ignorant hayseed routine and winking ironically at the audience. But in the hands of Renée Zellweger -- who proved her sweetheart credibility in "Jerry Maguire" -- Betty is 100 percent genuine sugar.

Continue reading: Nurse Betty Review

Possession Review


Good

Interweaving two hindrance-hurdling love stories that share a literary connection but take place more than a century apart, director Neil LaBute has taken another large and confident step into an unexpected genre with gratifying results.

"Possession," which is lovingly but sometimes loosely adapted from A.S. Byatt's novel of the same name, follows the germinating romance between two relationship-reluctant academics as they in turn follow a trail of evidence revealing a passionate secret affair between two Victorian poets.

A wild departure from LaBute's previous films -- the caustic, even cruel social satires "In the Company of Men" and "Your Friends and Neighbors," and the upbeat black comedy "Nurse Betty" -- this effort has the melodic trappings of a Merchant-Ivory romance. But it's also a perceptive musing on what has and hasn't changed between the two time periods in the emotional, practical and sometimes prohibitive logistics of love.

Continue reading: Possession Review

The Pledge Review


Weak

Director Sean Penn and star Jack Nicholson must have been drawn to the complexity of the haunted ex-detective character at the center of "The Pledge," because he's just about the only thing at all uncommon in this largely conventional serial killer suspense flick.

Although, even calling him uncommon is a stretch. Reno homicide dick Jerry Black is pretty much an assembly-line character -- a freshly retired cop obsessed with finding the "real killer" in an officially closed murder case that was his last assignment. Having made a promise to the parents of the dead little girl, he's still following hunches on his own time because nobody in the precinct believes him.

Doesn't Jerry sound like a regulation Morgan Freeman character? But with Nicholson in the role, he's a bit more of a wildcard. Big Jack brings an element of instability to Jerry that leaves the audience concerned for his sanity when his ostensive retirement finds him buying a gas station at a High Sierra crossroads as his nest egg because it's at the center of a geographic pattern he's discovered for his suspect.

Continue reading: The Pledge Review

The Missing Review


OK

As a good ol' damsels-in-distress Western with picturesque frontier vistas, a handful of Winchester rifle shootouts and enough character conflict to keep the long horse rides interesting, Ron Howard's "The Missing" is reliable, if over-earnest, matinee fodder.

Unfortunately, the director has his eye on the Oscar, and the strain he puts on a perfectly serviceable story in an attempt to ratchet up the prestige factor makes the movie seem awfully pretentious for a kidnap-and-rescue sagebrush saga.

The always riveting Cate Blanchett perfectly embodies the stamina, bravery and grit of an 1885 frontier woman as Maggie Gilkeson, a widowed mom who has suffered a hard life both with and without husbands and lovers. She has passed on that strength and tenacity to her two daughters -- teenaged beauty Lilly (Evan Rachel Wood), snatched by a gang of Indian guides who have rebelled against the deceitful Army, and stubborn, tough young Dot (Jenna Boyd) who steadfastly refuses to be left behind when a pursuit is mounted. ("I won't stay behind," she wails with powerful determination in the picture's most memorable moment. "Wherever you put me, I'll follow you. You know I will!")

Continue reading: The Missing Review

Paycheck Review


OK

After last year's botched bout with dour World War II drama in "Windtalkers," former Hong Kong action maestro John Woo is back to the far-fetched fun that is his trademark in "Paycheck," another too-Hollywood adaptation of a Philip K. Dick science fiction thriller.

Set in a stylish, chrome-and-glass near future where Ben Affleck is an in-demand high-tech engineering genius (yeah, right) who works as a hired gun on short-term top-secret projects, the plot turns on the fact that after each job he has his memory erased back to his hire date under the guise of what you might call extreme non-disclosure agreements.

Persuaded by a rich old friend (Aaron Eckhart) who runs a huge biotech conglomerate to take on a mysterious and illicit three-year job with a mega-bucks final payoff, when Ben wakes up after this latest gig, he discovers he's divested himself of a $93 million profit and left in its stead an envelope containing 13 cryptic items (strange sunglasses, hairspray, a paper clip, a fortune cookie fortune, a watch, etc.) that begin coming in suspiciously handy as he is hunted by assassins and the FBI.

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Aaron Eckhart

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Aaron Eckhart

Date of birth

12th March, 1968

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83




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