Aaron Paul would jump at the chance to play Jesse Pinkman again.

The 40-year-old actor recently reprised his role as the crystal meth cook and dealer in the spin-off movie 'El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie' - which is based on the hit crime drama series 'Breaking Bad' - and Aaron has said that he would be more than happy to do a sequel for the right reasons as he gushed about how great it was to work with the show's creator Vince Gilligan again.

Asked if he could see himself doing a second movie, he told Entertainment Weekly: ''You know what? It really is so nice to see a glimmer of hope in Jesse's life, and there's a subtle layer of peace that just kinda falls over him as he's driving into Haines, Alaska.

''It's honestly the same sort of closure that I forced myself to create for him. But just much more layered.

''I always hoped that he would find himself in the middle of Alaska, and now he is.

''But it did just get me excited, obviously, to work with Vince again.

''I just love that man so much, and if I could only work with him for the rest of my career, I would be the luckiest guy in Hollywood.

''I feel so blessed to be able to work alongside of not only a damn genius, but just such a humble, beautiful one.''

Aaron also explained how Vince would only continue the story ''for a reason'' as it's vital not to ''mess up'' the 'Breaking Bad' legacy.

He said: ''In all honesty, it was shock, first of all.

''But right after the shock it was just nothing but an enthusiastic yes. That's how much I trust Vince. Yes,

''I think the way 'Breaking Bad' ended was perfect.

''I think the show is perfect.

''I'm a little biased, of course, but I don't think that you could have done anything more on this show. He just nailed it.

''With that said, if Vince wants to continue this story, he's doing it for a reason.

''He doesn't want to mess with his legacy. There's a legacy for him to uphold here with 'Breaking Bad'.

''And he's the last person that wants to tarnish that.

''He told me in the first call, 'Look, I don't want to do this unless it's perfect. There's no reason for me to.'

And then seven months later, he finished the script and he told me, 'It's pretty damn good.' [Laughs] So I trusted him.''