Al Pacino Page 5

Al Pacino

Al Pacino Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Comments Quotes RSS

Al Pacino Reveals He Thought 'The Godfather' Would Fail


Al Pacino

The Godfather is pretty much universally held to be one of the finest movies in cinema history, but its lead star Al Pacino has made a surprising revelation: he thought it was “the worst film ever made” while he was filming it, and frequently got drunk as a result.

Many surviving members of the cast of the iconic 1972 film attended a 45th anniversary celebration of its release in a New York theater on Saturday (April 29th) as part of the Tribeca Film Festival. In addition to Pacino, fellow stars Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton, James Caan and Talia Shire, as well as director Francis Ford Coppola, were in attendance.

Al PacinoAl Pacino initially thought 'The Godfather' would fail

Continue reading: Al Pacino Reveals He Thought 'The Godfather' Would Fail

Emma Watson's New Film Makes Just £47 At UK Box Office


Emma Watson Al Pacino Anthony Hopkins

The Colony, Emma Watson’s latest film, took just £47 at the UK box office after it was released in three UK cinemas on Friday, according to The Guardian. The film is Watson’s first leading role since the Harry Potter franchise and is a thriller set in Pinochet-era Chile.

Emma WatsonEmma Watson’s new film made just £47 at the UK box office.

Watson stars as a Western woman who attempts to infiltrate a cult in order to rescue her husband who was abducted and is being held in religious community, Colonia Dignidad. The film was directed by Oscar-winning German director Florian Gallenberger.

Continue reading: Emma Watson's New Film Makes Just £47 At UK Box Office

How Did A Film Starring Al Pacino And Anthony Hopkins Manage Less Than £100 At The UK Box Office?


Al Pacino Anthony Hopkins Josh Duhamel Julia Stiles

With 12 Oscar nominations between them, you would think that any film which boasts Al Pacino and Anthony Hopkins among its cast would be a sure fire success. But sadly this wasn't the case for thriller Misconduct, which manage to take less than £100 during its opening weekend at the UK box office.

Al PacinoAl Pacino stars in Misconduct.

Alongside Pacino and Hopkins, the film also stars Josh Duhamel and Julia Stiles. It follows an ambitious lawyer (Duhamel) who finds himself caught between a corrupt pharmaceutical executive and his firm's senior partner (Hopkins and Pacino). As the case takes a deadly turn, lawyer Ben must search to uncover the truth before he loses everything.

Continue reading: How Did A Film Starring Al Pacino And Anthony Hopkins Manage Less Than £100 At The UK Box Office?

Misconduct Trailer


Ben Cahill is an ambitious lawyer with an overwhelming urge to see justice for those who often can't fight for themselves and he has a new target in his sight. Pearson pharmaceuticals are a huge global corporation and the chief at the top of the company is the founder Arthur Denning. When Ben learns about some possible manipulation in drug trails, he goes to his bosses and tells them that he can convict Denning of fraud. 

Continue: Misconduct Trailer

Natalie Portman Joins Likes Of Meryl Streep & Kevin Spacey In Paying Tribute To Mike Nichols


Natalie Portman Mike Nichols Meryl Streep Tom Hanks Ron Howard Steve Carell Al Pacino Kerry Washington Kevin Spacey

Natalie Portman has paid tribute to the late director Mike Nichols.

Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman at the Childrens' Hospital Gala in Los Angeles in October 2014.

Read More: The Life and Career of Late Director Mike Nichols.

Continue reading: Natalie Portman Joins Likes Of Meryl Streep & Kevin Spacey In Paying Tribute To Mike Nichols

Danny Collins - Trailer


1970s rocker Danny Collins (Al Pacino) has earned a reputation for himself as a sell-out. He hasn't written a song for years, and his family has been left behind while he embarks upon the life of a true rock star. But when his manager reveals a previously lost handwritten letter from John Lennon, instructing Collins to remember who he is and not lose himself. Wondering what could have happened if he had actually received the letter 40-years-ago, Collins embarks on a journey to rediscover his family and find out just what made him famous in the first place.

Continue: Danny Collins - Trailer

Interstellar Is A New Genre For Nolan


Christopher Nolan Anne Hathaway Matthew Mcconaughey Michael Caine Jessica Chastain Robin Williams Al Pacino

Over the past 15 years, Christopher Nolan has proven himself as a master of intelligent filmmaking, generally sticking to the psychological thriller genre while mixing in action and brain-bending flourishes. And now with Interstellar he has left the confines of Earth's gravity to head into science-fiction for the first time.

Matthew McConaughey & Anne Hathaway on setMatthew Mcconaughey & Anne Hathaway on set

Intriguingly, Nolan has still maintained his commitment to in-camera effects even in this genre, refusing to indulge in flashy digital trickery just because he can. Like his last few films, he has also shot portions of the film in Imax, massive screen imagery photographed on film, not digitally, which gives the entire movie an earthy texture that's intriguingly realistic. This also focusses even the most existential and scientific discussions squarely on the characters.

Continue reading: Interstellar Is A New Genre For Nolan

Pacino To Return To West End For Salome


Al Pacino Jessica Chastain

Al Pacino has exclusively revealed to the Daily Mail that he will be returning to the West End in a production of Oscar Wilde’s play, Salome, in 2016. This will mark a return to the London stage for the American actor for the first time in 30 years, although he has dipped his toe in the Wilde water before with productions of Salome in New York and Los Angeles.

Al Pacino and Jessica Chastain
Al Pacino and Jessica Chastain starred in Salome the film version together

The latter was filmed in 2006 as a cinema version that is currently on release, starring Jessica Chastain in the title role. This new British outing for Pacino will serve to be more than the rehearsed readings in the states and the star has promised: "We’ll be wearing clothes for London".

Continue reading: Pacino To Return To West End For Salome

A Week In Movies: Stars Premiere Films In Venice And Toronto, While Films Shoot In Los Angeles And London. Pixar Teases Lava, And Trailers Debut For Museum And Bosses Sequels


Al Pacino Owen Wilson Andrew Garfield Ethan Hawke January Jones Eddie Redmayne Zac Efron Ryan Reynolds

Al Pacino VIFF 2014

The Venice Film Festival came to a close this week with a flurry of star-studded premieres and the glitzy awards ceremony. Al Pacino was on hand with his film Manglehorn, Owen Wilson premiered his new comedy She's Funny That Way, Andrew Garfield and Michael Shannon walked the red carpet for 99 Homes, and Ethan Hawke and January Jones turned up for the screening of Good Kill.

Video - Al Pacino Signs Autographs At The 'Manglehorn' Premiere

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Stars Premiere Films In Venice And Toronto, While Films Shoot In Los Angeles And London. Pixar Teases Lava, And Trailers Debut For Museum And Bosses Sequels

Al Pacino - Celebrities at Toronto Pearson International Airport - Toronto, Canada - Sunday 7th September 2014

Al Pacino - Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) - Celebrity Sightings - Toronto, Canada - Sunday 7th September 2014

Al Pacino

Al Pacino (l) and director Barry Levinson - Toronto International Film Festival - 'The Humbling' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Thursday 4th September 2014

Al Pacino and Barry Levinson
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino, Lucila Sola and CAMILA SOLA - 71st Venice International Film Festival - 'The Humbling' - Premiere - Venice, Italy - Saturday 30th August 2014

Al Pacino, Lucila Sola and Camila Sola
Al Pacino, Lucila Sola and Camila Sola
Al Pacino, Lucila Sola and Camila Sola
Al Pacino, Lucila Sola and Camila Sola
Al Pacino, Lucila Sola and Camila Sola
Al Pacino, Lucila Sola and Camila Sola

Al Pacino - 71st Venice International Film Festival - 'The Humbling' - Photocall - Venice, Italy - Saturday 30th August 2014

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino and Barry Levinson
Al Pacino

Al Pacino - 71st Venice International Film Festival - 'Manglehorn' - Photocall - Venice, Italy - Saturday 30th August 2014

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino - While at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Al Pacino was mobbed by fans wanting autographs. The ‘Godfather’ and ‘Scarface’ actor was photographed signing various pictures and notes for the crowd which had awaited him - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 26th August 2014

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

The Lesser Known Films Of Robin Williams


Robin Williams Al Pacino Jeff Bridges Danny Devito

The late Robin Williams was well-known for a number of iconic roles and had spread his talent liberally across comedy, thriller, drama and animation. From the fantastically eccentric Mrs Doubtfire, to the troubled and unhappy Sean Maguire from Good Will Hunting and the inescapable comedic brilliance of the Genie in Aladdin, Robin Williams stamped his presence on so many films that audiences will never forget.

Robin Williams
Robin Williams tragically took his own life on Monday 11 August

But he also featured in a lot of motion pictures that people have forgotten: perhaps there’s only room in the human brain for so many brilliant movies. As a tribute to the actor, who was found dead as a result of suicide on Monday 11 August, we look at some of his lesser known projects.

Continue reading: The Lesser Known Films Of Robin Williams

Al Pacino - Al Pacino mobbed by fans at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 4th May 2014

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Bono and Al Pacino - 9th Annual Los Angeles Italia Film, Fashion and Art Fest opening night ceremony held at the TLC Chinese 6 Theatres - Los Angeles, Italy - Sunday 23rd February 2014

Bono and Al Pacino
Bono, Al Pacino and Naomie Harris
Bono and Al Pacino
Bono and Al Pacino
Bono and Al Pacino
Bono, Al Pacino and Naomie Harris

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola - 65th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards held at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 22nd September 2013

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola

Al Pacino - Al Pacino and Jennifer Garner arriving on the set of 'Imagine' in Van Nuys - Van Nuys, CA, United States - Wednesday 31st July 2013

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Primetime Emmy Awards 2013: How Accurate Were Nomination Predictions?


Emmy Awards Sofia Vergara Kevin Spacey Toby Jones Neil Patrick Harris Maggie Smith Helen Mirren Netflix Paul Aaron Kate Mara Adam Driver Ed O'Neill Bobby Cannavale Mandy Patinkin Jim Carter Al Pacino Peter Dinklage Michael Douglas Matt Damon Anna Gunn Alec Baldwin Matt Le Blanc Jason Bateman Bill Hader Tony Hale Julie Bowen Kerry Washington Claire Danes Connie Britton Jon Hamm Damian Lewis Jeff Daniels Emilia Clarke Christina Hendricks Benedict Cumberbatch Laura Linney Jessica Lange Game Of Thrones

The Primetime Emmy Award nominations were announced yesterday (Thursday 18th July). The nomination ceremony was presented by Kate Mara and Aaron Paul via a live video stream on the Emmy's website. 

Kate Mara
Kate Mara at the Vanity Fair and Juicy Couture's Celebration of 2013 in L.A.

Netflix has managed to triumph with nominations for their shows: House of Cards; Hemlock Grove and Arrested Development. The company are developing this aspect of their business, which is proving hugely popular and profitable. The future does seem bright for the company which announced it was expanding into its 64th country. It also seems likely their awards over the next few years will increase especially with recent praise of Orange is the New Black

Continue reading: Primetime Emmy Awards 2013: How Accurate Were Nomination Predictions?

Al Pacino and Tony Montana - Can you guess which celebrity made each particular eyepiece famous? - Wednesday 19th June 2013

Al Pacino and Tony Montana

Al Pacino Could Have Been A Star Wars Star – If He’d Understood The Plot


Al Pacino

Al Pacino turned down the major talk shows and newspapers, who were dying for an interview with the legendary actor. Instead, he hosted a Q&A show in New York, Sydney and now London.

The show would never be recreated; would never be screened. It was well and truly a one-off. Some of the things he said, though, have escaped the walls of the London Palladium. It turns out, Pacino, best known for his roles in The Godfather, Scarface and Dog Day Afternoon, could have been known for his roles in Star Wars and Die Hard. "Star Wars was mine for the taking but I didn’t understand the script," he admitted, according to The Evening Standard. "I’m not a very good judge of what’s good," he also said. We can’t really see it, Al, not in Star Wars, anyway. A role as the bad guy in Die Hard may have worked, but Harrison Ford and Bruce Willis nailed Han and John for us. He denied being offered the leading roles in Goodfellas, Midnight Cowboy and Misery, made famous by Robert De Niro, Dustin Hoffman and James Caan, though.

The insider gossip didn’t stop there. Apprently, "Michelle was a good kisser, Michelle Pfeiffer," he said, referring to their time on 1991's Frankie and Johnny. All in all, fans of film will have been enthralled by his talk, which included some off the cuff acting and his classic, dry sense of humour.

Continue reading: Al Pacino Could Have Been A Star Wars Star – If He’d Understood The Plot

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola - Al Pacino and Lucila Sola seen leaving their hotel in Central London - London, United Kingdom - Monday 3rd June 2013

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola - Al Pacino and Lucila Sola at Heathrow Airport - London, United Kingdom - Monday 3rd June 2013

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola

Al Pacino - Celebrities leave The Ritz hotel - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 1st June 2013

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino - Al Pacino leaving the Dorchester Hotel - London, United Kingdom - Friday 31st May 2013

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino - Al Pacino is swamped by fans wanting an autograph as he leaves his hotel - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 30th May 2013

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino - Al Pacino appears during his 'One Night Only' performance at the Seminole Hard Rock Live - Hollywood, FL, United States - Saturday 27th April 2013

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino - Celebrities leaving the 8th Annual Los Angeles Italia Film, Fashion and Art Festival honoring Al Pacino - Los Angeles, United States - Sunday 17th February 2013

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino - The 8th Annual Los Angeles, Italia Film, Fashion and Art Festival honoring Al Pacino - Los Angeles, California - Sunday 17th February 2013

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Hot Tickets! US Movie Releases: Nicholas Hoult Stars In Zom Com 'Warm Bodies,' Stellar Cast Can't Save 'Stand Up Guys,' Another Stallone Doozy In 'Bullet To The Head'


Nicholas Hoult Teresa Palmer John Malkovich Christopher Walken Al Pacino Alan Arkin Sylvester Stallone

We’re going to ease in to our round-up of this week’s movie releases, by starting with the ‘above average’ and moving gently down the quality scale, to the truly awful. We already know, by the fact that Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters is riding high at the top of the box office, that there is literally no accounting for taste, so we will no longer try to influence your movie-going habits. We will simply present you with the facts and leave you to queue for your popcorn.

First up, Nicholas Hoult and Teresa Palmer star in Warm Bodies, a zombie comedy that gets the laughs from Hoult’s slightly unusual zombie character who decides to save a living human, rather than chomp down on her arteries for a nice snack. Of course, that living human happens to be an attractive young female, in the form of Teresa Palmer (who, for the record, looks a lot like Kristen Stewart in this movie). John Malkovich also stars in this zom-com, which is a little bit ‘Shaun of the Dead,’ (pretending to be a zombie? Been there, done that) but looks like an entertaining way to pass a couple of hours.

Richard Roper of Chicago Sun-Times came up trumps with the most enthusiastic review so far, writing “I kinda love this movie. "Warm Bodies" is a well-paced, nicely directed, post-apocalyptic love story with a terrific sense of humor and the, um, guts to be unabashedly romantic and unapologetically optimistic.” 

Continue reading: Hot Tickets! US Movie Releases: Nicholas Hoult Stars In Zom Com 'Warm Bodies,' Stellar Cast Can't Save 'Stand Up Guys,' Another Stallone Doozy In 'Bullet To The Head'

Al Pacino - Al Pacino At The Tribeca Grill New York City USA Thursday 17th January 2013

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Hot Tickets - US Movie Releases - The Hobbit Bound For Box Office Success, Save The Date Is A Rom-Com Let Down, Pacino And Walken Save Stand-Up Guys


Martin Freeman Peter Jackson Al Pacino Christopher Walken Alan Arkin

This week’s movie releases are an even-handed mix of big budget blockbuster, gentle rom-com and moving documentary.

Obviously, the big chatter is all about Peter Jackson’s latest movie, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, which has arrived to a great fanfare but received a mixed response, thus far. Thanks to the legions of fans hooked on the very thought of a Tolkein adaptation, The Hobbit will undoubtedly attract enough over-excited cinemagoers to bump it up the box office ratings and we will most likely see Skyfall slipping down the ratings chart.

Despite reports of movie fans vomiting in the aisles of their local movie theatres, with their stomachs unsettled by Jackson’s decision to film The Hobbit at 48 frames per second as opposed to the standard 24 frames per second, the film has just about escaped the wrath of the critics. Although the response to The Hobbit has hardly been a case of anyone shouting from the rooftops, bursting with praise, Martin Freeman has been widely praised for his performance as Bilbo Baggins, balancing the fine line that his character must tread between comedic and heroic.

Continue reading: Hot Tickets - US Movie Releases - The Hobbit Bound For Box Office Success, Save The Date Is A Rom-Com Let Down, Pacino And Walken Save Stand-Up Guys

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola - Al Pacino and Lucila Sola Thursday 11th October 2012 48th Chicago International Film Festival, opening night red carpet arrivals for the film "Stand Up Guys"

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola

Stand Up Guys - Trailer Trailer


Doc is lifelong criminal who goes to meet his best friend Val when he leaves prison following a long sentence, but little does Val know that his crime companion has been forced to kill him by his crook boss Hirsch. It doesn't take him long to realise, however, with Doc's sheepish presence constantly giving him away. The pair decide to enjoy themselves in the only ways they know how; theft, drugs and alcohol, before the time comes when Doc has to do the deed to save his own life. As the time draws nearer, he pleads with Hirsch for mercy, unwilling to shoot dead his best and only friend while Val repents for his sins in confession for the first time in 60 years in a bid to make his peace with God before he dies.

This crime comedy highlights friendship, unbreakable promises and sin as the main themes played out by a star-studded main cast. It has been directed by the Oscar winning actor Fisher Stevens in his second feature film after his 'Just a Kiss', and written by Noah Haidle in his first full length feature film and Dave Weasel his first ever feature film. It is set for release in the US on January 11th 2013.

Starring: Al Pacino, Christopher Walken, Alan Arkin, Julianna Margulies, Mark Margolis, Katheryn Winnick, Vanessa Ferlito, Addison Timlin, Bill Burr, Rick Gomez, Weronika Rosati, Eric Etebari, Courtney Galiano, Yorgo Constantine & Brandon Scott.

Continue: Stand Up Guys - Trailer Trailer

Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City Wednesday 12th September 2012 Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos and John C. McGinley Meet and greet with the cast of the Broadway play ‘Glengarry Glen Ross’, held at Ballet Hispanico. New York City, USA

Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Daniel Sullivan, Al Pacino, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, Al Pacino Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, Al Pacino Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, Al Pacino Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Bobby Cannavale, Al Pacino Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City

Al Pacino Monday 18th June 2012 50th Anniversary Gala to Honour Al Pacino held at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park, Manhattan - Outside arrivals

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Al Pacino Monday 18th June 2012 50th Anniversary Gala to Honour Al Pacino held at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park, Manhattan - Arrivals

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

Jack And Jill Trailer


Jack Sadelstein loves his family. He loves his wife, Erin and he loves his two children, Sofia and Gary. But the one family member he truly hates is his sister, Jill. Which is why Jack dreads Thanksgiving every year; it's the one time of the year where Jill travels up to see him to stay for a few days.

Continue: Jack And Jill Trailer

The Son Of No One Trailer


Jonathan is a young cop with a loving wife and small daughter. He enjoys his job and his life could not be any better. However, as a child Jonathan was forced to make some life changing decisions that have haunted him ever since.

Continue: The Son Of No One Trailer

88 Minutes Trailer


Watch the trailer for 88 Minutes.

Continue: 88 Minutes Trailer

Righteous Kill Review


Very Good
Robert De Niro and Al Pacino -- has there ever been a better acting team? For the first time since 1995's Heat, the two have leading roles in the same film, and their presence has allowed Righteous Kill to build a substantial amount of buzz. While the movie doesn't live up to the anticipation, it does pack a decent punch, thanks entirely to the leading men.

When hard-boiled rapists, pedophiles, murders, and drug lords slip through the legal system, are people who take the law into their own hands criminals or heroes? Righteous Kill explores the familiar subject of vigilante killers with a slight twist. This time, the killer is a cop.

Continue reading: Righteous Kill Review

...and Justice For All. Review


Very Good
Sorry to break it to you, but the line "The whole system's out of order!" does not appear in ...And Justice for All., Norman Jewison's send-up of the American legal system and one of the films with the most complicated punctuation ever to be released

The actual line that Al Pacino bellows out in the film's final scene, in case you're wondering, is this: "You're out of order! You're out of order! The whole trial is out of order! They're out of order!" Nah, doesn't quite roll off the tongue the same way, does it?

Continue reading: ...and Justice For All. Review

Cruising Review


Very Good
Were it not set in the gay underworld of its era, 1980's Cruising would be a largely unremarkable film. But provocateur William Friedkin did set it in this underworld -- a seedy, sex-filled shocker than must have had audiences in tears -- and thus it has become a cult classic, almost notorious, really.

The story is, by and large, traditional serial killer fare: Someone is stabbing gay men to death, often in lewd situations. The NYPD captain (Paul Sorvino) sends in Steve Burns (Al Pacino) undercover to ferret out the killer. The straight-edge Steve learns all about gay culture, in which pocket to put bandanas to indicate your proclivities, and so on. But by and large he's just supposed to "go out there and find the killer." But the undercover activity takes its toll on his psyche, most notably in his (non-gay) relationship with Nancy (Karen Allen, virtually the only woman in the film at all).

Continue reading: Cruising Review

Ocean's Thirteen Review


Very Good
The jazzy music, saturated-to-bleeding colors, and even the credits font make it clear from the outset: Ocean's Thirteen is more variety show than heist thriller. The gang of thieves from Ocean's Eleven and Ocean's Twelve is re-assembled, and while their new scam is more of a group effort than the scattered riffing of Twelve, its building-block cons are as cool and varied as ever.

Returning to the stage, the Ocean crew: Rusty (Brad Pitt) puts on scraggly facial hair to play a seismologist. Linus (Matt Damon) prepares to seduce a casino employee (Ellen Barkin), a task that, he insists, requires a prosthetic nose. Basher (Don Cheadle) mostly minds a giant piece of construction equipment, but impersonates a motorcycle daredevil on the fly as an elaborate distraction. The brothers Malloy (Casey Affleck and Scott Caan) are off to Mexico. George Clooney's Billy Ocean, as usual, acts as ringleader, which means a lot of standing around looking fabulous in suits, as well as one spectacularly well-timed eyeroll.

Continue reading: Ocean's Thirteen Review

Oceans Thirteen Trailer


Oceans Thirteen
Trailer Stream

Continue: Oceans Thirteen Trailer

Scarface Review


OK
To say that Al Pacino chews the scenery as Tony Montana, Cuban drug lord par excellence, doesn't really do justice to the performance. Pacino tears into his lines with a lust approaching frenzy, ripping through scenes with an animalistic fervor, creating a role that has already gone down in the books as one of the great, if not the greatest, portrayals of a gangster ever to hit the screen. It's also, watching some 20 years down the line, laughably campy in a manner that the rest of this bloated, self-important film doesn't seem to appreciate.

Pacino and producer Martin Bregman had a good idea in wanting to make an updated version of the original 1932 Scarface, which chronicled the rise and fall of a Prohibition-era Capone-like criminal overlord (screenwriter Ben Hecht was a Chicago journalist with a lot of intimate knowledge of Capone). Handing it over to director Brian De Palma (who had specialized mostly in psychosexual thrillers like Dressed to Kill and The Fury), and screenwriter Oliver Stone (whose credits included an Oscar for 1978's Midnight Express but also Conan the Barbarian), was a daring move. Stone did a lot of research for the screenplay, hanging out and doing coke with drug lords all over Latin America, and De Palma promised to bring a certain visual flair to the proceedings.

Continue reading: Scarface Review

Dog Day Afternoon Review


Extraordinary
Attica! Attica!

I'd say they don't make 'em like Dog Day Afternoon anymore, but, you know, they sure do try to. Bank robbers under fire, hostage negotiations, panic in the streets. Why, moviedom is littered with films like Heat, Mad City, The Negotiator... some good, some bad.

Continue reading: Dog Day Afternoon Review

Insomnia (2002) Review


OK
Director Christopher Nolan, the auteur behind the masterful Memento, has made an odd choice for a follow-up, choosing to remake the Norwegian film Insomnia, which starred Stellan Skarsgård as a troubled cop investigating a murder north of the Arctic Circle, where the sun never sets. Nolan has kept the story intact, moving it 'round the Circle from Norway to Alaska, putting monster stars Al Pacino and Robin Williams in the lead roles... and telling the whole story backwards!

Okay, I'm joking about the backwards part, but to tell you the truth, this retread could have used it. It certainly needs a lot more than Pacino's overacting and cinematographer Wally Pfister's mood lighting to be watchable.

Continue reading: Insomnia (2002) Review

Carlito's Way Review


Extraordinary
Spitting in the face of the idea that criminals are simply nurtured by their environments, legendary gangster Carlito Brigante (Al Pacino, doing a vague approximation of a Puerto Rican accent) stands before a judge in the 1993 Brian De Palma film Carlito's Way and refuses to blame his criminal ways on his upbringing or the fact that his mother died when he was young: "The fact is, your honor, I was a mean little bastard when she was alive."

It's a rebuke to the environment-nurtures-criminals mentality that infused the previous De Palma/Pacino collaboration from 10 years earlier, Scarface, which stands as the bloody and exciting but frankly pretty immature younger brother to the more stately and ultimately more affecting Carlito's Way. The differences are obvious right from the film's opening gunshot: Carlito's been popped and is being wheeled away to the hospital, musing as he dies, "Don't take me to no hospital... Some bitch always pops you at midnight when all they got is a Chinese intern with a wooden spoon." The rest of the film is in flashback, starting with Carlito being let out of jail after serving only five years of a 30-year-sentence and leading back up to that gunshot.

Continue reading: Carlito's Way Review

Serpico Review


Excellent
Damn dirty cops! It's gonna take Frank Serpico to clean up this town!!!

Based on a true story of rampant corruption and internal affairs in New York City (where else?), Serpico stands as the consummate cop movie, right up there with The French Connection. But while The French Connection is a standard cops-and-robbers movie, Serpico is pretty much cops-and-cops, as Al Pacino's title character hunts out corruption inside the department even though it means all but signing his death warrant.

Continue reading: Serpico Review

Heat Review


Excellent
I hate to condone the making of 3-hour long movies, but Heat is one in which you're not going to fall asleep. Comparisons to Casino are going to be inevitable, with both hitting the 180-minute mark and starring Robert De Niro as a crook, but unlike that film, Heat manages to keep the interest level high throughout the whole picture.

Heat is the instantly gripping tale of a large-scale heist leader and die-hard loner named Neil McCauley (De Niro). As the film opens, he and his team of brutal, precision thieves (including Val Kilmer and Tom Sizemore) knock over (literally) an armored car for a stash of bearer bonds. On the case is Detective Vincent Hanna (Al Pacino), a troubled, angst-ridden veteran of the LAPD. Over the course of the film, McCauley and Hanna develop a strange sort of kinship, even as McCauley's crimes increasingly raise the stakes and Hanna's efforts to stop him become more and more desperate.

Continue reading: Heat Review

Any Given Sunday Review


Very Good
Football is as engrained in our society's mores as deeply as war, family values, and politics -- at least that's what Oliver Stone would like you to believe. To back up this statement, Any Given Sunday analyzes the effects of a culture that elevates professional athletes and coaches to a plateau where they are immortalized as heroes of the common man. Stone's football fairytale is a culmination of every anecdote, highlight, or soundbite you've ever seen associated with the pigskin, wrapped up in an aesthetically pleasing Christmas package, and sealed with a kiss from team owner Cameron Diaz. Stone aims to please, and he doesn't miss a single cliché of the revered and scrutinized American athlete.

At its core, Any Given Sunday is the story of Miami Sharks coach Tony D'Amato (Al Pacino - The Godfather, Dog Day Afternoon) and his two quarterbacks, Willie Beamen (Jamie Foxx - The Great White Hype, Booty Call) and Cap Rooney (Dennis Quaid - The Big Easy, Innerspace). The quarterback is the most vital position in the game. He is the team spokesperson and field chief, and he serves as a crucial link between coaches, administration, and players. When legendary two-time Pantheon Cup (aka: Super Bowl) champion Cap Bowman ruptures a disk after a bone crushing hit, coach Tony is left with Willie Beamen (Foxx), an athletic, yet untested QB. His team has lost four straight and appears to be plummeting in a downward spiral with the playoffs right around the corner. He's got delusional team owner Christina Pagniacci (Cameron Diaz) and sports analyst Jack Rose (John McGinley, doing his best Jim Rome impersonation) breathing down his neck because of his outdated coaching style, and a team of players he's losing control of.

Continue reading: Any Given Sunday Review

City Hall Review


Good
There's two things I dislike: politics and long, boring speeches. City Hall has plenty of both, and while Al Pacino is almost cool enough to make me think politics can be okay, it's got so many long speeches that I started looking for the remote control after the third or fourth one.

City Hall is a drama/thriller with most of the thrill sucked out of it. After a ridiculously convoluted opening, filled with the weak voice-over of the Deputy Mayor of New York City, Kevin Calhoun (John Cusack), we find ourselves embroiled in the world of Mayor John Pappas (Pacino). As the film opens, we find a cop and mobster killed in a shoot-out, taking with them the life of a six-year old boy.

Continue reading: City Hall Review

Gigli Review


Bad
That deafening sound you hear is negative buzz. Gigli just opened, and already it has plenty. Early test screenings started it. The media fueled it. And the release of the film may finally conclude our on-going fascination with A-list celebrity couple Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez.

For those who never tune into E! (shame on you), here's the backstory. Ben and Jen fell in love on the Gigli set. Fireworks off-screen, though, didn't translate to chemistry on-screen, and the movie was shredded by test audiences. Columbia originally planned to open Gigli in November 2002, but hesitated and shelved the film until now, which usually signifies disaster.

Continue reading: Gigli Review

People I Know Review


Weak
People I Know is a character study cum murder mystery that won't be known to many theatre patrons and won't be missed. It's a labored 24-hour journey with a worn-out New York publicist (also known as a press agent) struggling to maintain the residue of vitality he enjoyed in an earlier life. More characters in the story show him the admiration he once commanded than moviegoers are likely to. There's not much to admire.

The film starts with entrenched Big Apple dweller Al Pacino affecting a Georgia accent -- interesting, but no more required by the plotline than if he had come from Florida or North Dakota. About all the southern background does for his character, Eli Wurman, is provide an exaggeration to his promotional pushiness at one time, and slow, slurry speech to befit his character's drug-induced degradation at other times.

Continue reading: People I Know Review

Donnie Brasco Review


Very Good
Well, someone had to wrest the monopoly on gangster movies from the hands of Scorsese and Coppola. So why not Mike Newell, of Four Weddings and a Funeral fame, to direct it? And why not put Johnny Depp in a starring role? And Anne Heche -- you know, Ellen's girlfriend -- as his wife!? It sounds bizarre, but put this group together with Monster of Acting Pacino and Quiz Show scribe Paul Attanasio and you've got a pleasant surprise on your hands, not to mention one of the longest-running films at the box office this year. Long stuck in development because of GoodFellas, Donnie Brasco is in many ways a similar film, and in most of them better. The true story of FBI agent Joe Pistone, who in the late 70s infiltrated his way into the New York mafia to become a "made man" under the name of Donnie Brasco, Depp is surprisingly believable as an earnest father caught up in the mob mentality. Pacino shines as always, though it's not his usual character; here he's a tragic King Lear who just can't catch a break. But as for the iffy pan-and-scan job on the videotape, take a cue from the wiseguys: Fuggedaboudit.

The Godfather: Part II Review


Extraordinary
The inimitable Godfather story continues in The Godfather Part II.

Unlike many critics, I don't feel the sequel has the weight of the original -- many feel it to be better than the first film -- but it certainly is a necessary and extremely good follow-up, adding a wealth of information about "the family" that only serves to enhance the experience of the original movie. The problem, of course, is how could you measure up to The Godfather? The truly memorable scenes from the series -- the spilling cart of oranges, the horse's head, Michael's vengeance in the Italian restaurant, "an offer he couldn't refuse" -- are all found in the original, not here (or at best, they are simply repeated in the sequel). Godfather 2's most memorable moments -- the Senator's private meeting with Michael ("My offer is this: Nothing."), the denouement of Fredo -- pale in comparison. Well, not exactly pale, but you can't say that Godfather 2 is as good as Numero Uno.

Continue reading: The Godfather: Part II Review

Angels In America Review


Good
There are times when Mike Nichols' long-awaited HBO adaptation of Tony Kushner's award-riddled Reagan-era AIDS epic play, Angels in America, just about achieves that grand moment of completion that it's been striving for, and the failure to do so is almost heartbreaking. There are numerous reasons why Kushner's play has never been brought to film before, despite serving for many years as the landmark theatrical statement on AIDS in the 1980s - the lyrical counterpoint to the factual reportage of the book and film And the Band Played On - and highest among them is its length. Nichols' version takes the play at its original, somewhat off-putting size, divided up into two three-hour parts, and does pretty much the best with its material that one could ask for; any problems with the finished product are likely Kushner's own.

Part one, "Millennium Approaches" is full of ominous portents, plague and destruction, the rampant spread of AIDS in the chilly clime of '80s conservatism, while the second, "Perestroika" makes the political issues bandied about earlier in the film devastatingly personal. The story runs from 1985 to 1990 and takes in a broad sweep of characters, but not nearly as many as other writers would have packed in, simply to give a broader demographic sampling. Central to the film is Prior Walter (Justin Kirk), a 30-year-old AIDS sufferer whose boyfriend Louis (Ben Shenkman) leaves him in an astonishingly heartless manner, only to take up soon after with recently uncloseted U.S. attorney Joe Pitt (Patrick Wilson). Left mostly to his own devices, with only his friend Belize (Jeffery Wright) to help, as Walter gets sicker, he begins to have visions of an angel (Emma Thompson, odd, arrogant and completely captivating), determined to make him a prophet, claiming that God has deserted the world and that humans are at fault.

Continue reading: Angels In America Review

The Merchant Of Venice Review


Very Good
When I heard that Al Pacino was playing Shylock in The Merchant of Venice, part of me was extremely skeptical. I was fearful he would bellow every other word ("If YOU prick US!"), which has been his acting technique for over a decade. Or, perhaps he would lapse into the Foghorn Leghorn accent that made The Recruit such a hoot.

It's been a crap shoot with the great actor for some time. Watching Pacino is like watching a beloved, over the hill athlete sticking around. He hobbles, the crispness of his movements isn't there, and the mixture of luck and confidence he once had is just a pleasant memory. More often than not, you just hope he just doesn't stumble. You just want a glimmer of what once was.

Continue reading: The Merchant Of Venice Review

Simone Review


Good
It might sound contrived to say that a film about a computer-generated movie star is a little flat but... well, there it is. It's the unfortunate truth about writer/director Andrew Niccol's Simone, an Al Pacino-led comedy where Niccol visits some of the same intriguing notions of fame, success, and public perception as in his screenplay for The Truman Show. In that film, the center of attention was a man watched by an adoring and all-knowing viewing audience -- in Simone, the public still loves a superstar... they just have no clue that she's a complete fake.

And not "fake," like some butt-kissing movie actress, but really fake. Simone (or S1m0ne, as Niccol sharply titles the film) is the perfect pixilated creation of a Microsoft-age mad scientist, who's created his flawless CGI actress specifically for floundering moviemaker Viktor Taransky (a truly entertaining Al Pacino). Viktor needs a hit badly and the lead actress on his new feature -- played by Winona Ryder, in a painfully ironic appearance -- has just stormed off his new movie due to "creative differences." Nine months later (human gestation period, if I'm not mistaken) Simone is born to take her place. And since our obsessive inventor has quickly died from an eye tumor, contracted from too much computer use(!), only Viktor knows the true secret of his new lead actress.

Continue reading: Simone Review

The Godfather: Part III Review


Good
Why make another Godfather? While he gives it the old college try, Francis Ford Coppola fails to answer the question in The Godfather Part III, which picks up the saga of the Corleones decades later -- which finds Michael (Al Pacino) still unable to go legit. By 1990, he's near death (having heart attacks and whatnot), and he figures the Catholic Church is his best route to legitimacy. And wouldn't you know it, they're corrupt too. Well, you know, just when he thought he was out, they pull him back in...

While the film is well-acted (with the surprising exception of Diane Keaton reprising a role that wasn't all that interesting to begin with), masterfully lighted, and gorgeously photographed -- most notably the various shootout scenes -- it ultimately treads over old ground: material from the first two movies as well as repeating itself. This is most telling in the aforementioned shootouts -- the Atlantic City shoot-'em-up (courtesy of a helicopter outside) is horrifyingly grotesque (in a good way), but it seems more fitting for the histrionics of Scarface than the subtle and jaw-dropping one-two punch of Michael Corleone's assassination work at Louis' Italian-American Restaurant in The Godfather. Ultimately, the movie is simply one assassination after another -- and in Coppola's commentary track, he acknowledges this, placing much of the blame at the foot of the studio. It's also a testament to the amount of power that Coppola lost in the intervening decades -- again, something he acknowledges in the commentary.

Continue reading: The Godfather: Part III Review

The Godfather Review


Essential
I remember the first time I viewed The Godfather. It was 25 years to the day after its initial theatre release, and it was being re-realased, as many films were at the time, for their anniversary. So, trotting to the Mercer Mall General Cinemas on Route one (I literally trotted, I was without car and always looking over my shoulder for fear of getting run over by one of those infamous New Jersey drivers (of which I am a member)), I bought my ticket and proceeded to get the seat, front and center, as normal, in one of the smaller screens in the theatre. As I recall, the last movie I had watched in there was Night Falls on Manhattan with Richard Dreyfuss, Ian Holm, and Andy Garcia. I had seen the famous first moments before, knew the parodies of it back and front, but had never seen the film itself.

In Italian: Molto bene.

Continue reading: The Godfather Review

The Insider Review


Excellent
Listen up! A movie adapted from a magazine article about the making of a four-year old segment of a television program: Does this pitch have you hooked yet? No? Well, despite a potentially dry-as-dust premise, The Insider manages to rise above its inherent limitations and provides a compelling look inside the politics of 60 Minutes and the tobacco industry.

They say you should never see two things being made: Sausage and legislation. Add journalism to that list. I've been in this racket long enough to know that objectivity is painfully lacking in the places you expect to find it the most. Backroom deals make strange bedfellows of interest-conflicted parties (e.g. Time-Warner owns Entertainment Weekly magazine, which reviews Warner Bros. films, etc.) So when 60 Minutes producer Lowell Bergman (Pacino) decided to do a story about the hazards of cigarettes in 1996, he found himself embroiled in controversy.

Continue reading: The Insider Review

Glengarry Glen Ross Review


Essential
Pacino should have won an Oscar for his performance as a land salesman/con-man in this ensemble piece about what happens on the other side of the phone line during those late night sales pitches you get. In this case it's real estate (worthless, of course, though that's never stated) the sharks are selling. And they aren't really that good at it, either. Pacino's the rainmaker of the group, but supporting characters played by Jack Lemmon, Alan Arkin, and Ed Harris are struggling. When some breaks in to the manager's (Kevin Spacey) office and steals the good "Glengarry" leads, all hell breaks loose.

Who knew director James Foley had this movie in him. With credits from Who's That Girl? to Fear to The Corruptor, Foley hasn't made a passable movie before or since this 1992 production. Having a script by David Mamet (based on his stage play) doesn't hurt, nor does having at least two screen legends in the cast. Hell, even the minor characters are stellar. Jonathan Pryce's beaten-down mark is one of the most memorably pathetic losers on celluloid. Alec Baldwin's five minutes of screen time here is his greatest work ever.

Continue reading: Glengarry Glen Ross Review

The Devil's Advocate Review


Very Good
It takes a story this ridiculous to be this good. Imagine The Firm, but with the Devil. (Cue demonic laughter.) Keanu Reeves stars as a rising star of a lawyer, and Al Pacino stars as the Devil himself (sample line: "Call me dad!"). The movie plays perfectly into Pacino's penchant to overact the crap out of his part -- only this part has no limit to the attitude you can throw at it. The rest of the film is simply very well-made. Special effects, acting (particularly Charlize Theron as Keanu's sanity-vacating wife), music, set design -- it's all there. No, it ain't Oscar bait, it's just one, ahem, hell of a good time.

The Recruit Review


Good
Rarely do I have any trouble coming up with a way to lead into a movie review. But The Recruit has really thrown me a puzzle. Do I say something about its slick Hollywood production values and typically over-the-top performance by Al Pacino? Do I comment on its wealth of technical implausibilities? Or should I say something about how you should never trust a redhead, newbie spy James's (Colin Farrell) first obvious mistake in the film?

None of these leads really grabbed me, but then again, neither did The Recruit. It's a glossy and well-massaged thriller, designed to give you two hours of eye candy and gently massage your brain -- but not too much! After all, a fickle mass audience might be weighing their investment against the simplicity of Kangaroo Jack.

Continue reading: The Recruit Review

Scarecrow Review


Good
Hackman and Pacino? You better believe it. And while this odd mix of Of Mice and Men, Midnight Cowboy, and Waiting for Godot has several charming moments, it never really finds its groove. The loose story concerns the pair of drifters who hatch a plan to start their own car wash -- though that idea never really materializes. Instead, the ride the rails and the roads, waiting for life to happen to them. Both leads are fantastic, but the script is weak.

Scent Of A Woman Review


Excellent
Al Pacino got his ribbing for "hoo-ahhh!"ing his way through Scent of a Woman, but underneath the scenery chewing, there's a sweet and watchable film to be seen. Pacino is a blind ex-army man with skeletons galore, Chris O'Donnell is a prep school kid who's landed in some unexpected trouble and takes on a job watching Pacino over Thanksgiving. They learn from each other, just as each finds a way to save the life -- figuratively or truly -- of the other. Fun to watch.

Two For The Money Review


Weak
Two for the Money is so frustrating to watch because you can see it falling apart with every additional subplot, every misused actor, and every tectonic shift in the story. The script covers so much ground that by the halfway point you feel none of the loose ends will ever be satisfactorily completed. And sure enough, that's what happens.

Matthew McConaughey plays Brandon Lang, an ex-college quarterback whose ability to pick winning football teams grabs the attention of Walter Abrams (Al Pacino), a big-time New York City gambling advisor, whose apparent wealth and power is enough to convince Lang to skip Las Vegas for the Big Apple.

Continue reading: Two For The Money Review

Scarface Review


OK
To say that Al Pacino chews the scenery as Tony Montana, Cuban drug lord par excellence, doesn't really do justice to the performance. Pacino tears into his lines with a lust approaching frenzy, ripping through scenes with an animalistic fervor, creating a role that has already gone down in the books as one of the great, if not the greatest, portrayals of a gangster ever to hit the screen. It's also, watching some 20 years down the line, laughably campy in a manner that the rest of this bloated, self-important film doesn't seem to appreciate.

Pacino and producer Martin Bregman had a good idea in wanting to make an updated version of the original 1932 Scarface, which chronicled the rise and fall of a Prohibition-era Capone-like criminal overlord (screenwriter Ben Hecht was a Chicago journalist with a lot of intimate knowledge of Capone). Handing it over to director Brian De Palma (who had specialized mostly in psychosexual thrillers like Dressed to Kill and The Fury), and screenwriter Oliver Stone (whose credits included an Oscar for 1978's Midnight Express but also Conan the Barbarian), was a daring move. Stone did a lot of research for the screenplay, hanging out and doing coke with drug lords all over Latin America, and De Palma promised to bring a certain visual flair to the proceedings.

Continue reading: Scarface Review

Any Given Sunday Review


Good

There's only about 22 minutes of plot in "Any Given Sunday," Oliver Stone's innovative, bone-crunching ballet of sound and fury football, so lets get that out of the way right now:

Al Pacino stars as the embattled, old-school coach of a fictitious pro football team. Cameron Diaz, is the willful, profit-zealous daughter of the franchise's recently deceased owner. Jamie Foxx is a hotshot young quarterback whose know-it-all attitude and colossal ego threaten team unity. He's just replaced the injured, aging, Elway-esque veteran QB Dennis Quaid, whose compound back injury has spelled curtains for his career -- if only his ruthlessly ambitious, harpy of a wife (Lauren Holly) would accept that fact.

During the last two minutes of the fourth quarter of the Big Playoff Game that serves as the film's climax, each of these characters (especially the selfish ones) will have an epiphany about what's really important in their lives.

Continue reading: Any Given Sunday Review

S1m0ne Review


Weak

Beneath the uncanny, inevitable and seemingly shrewd facade of the movie-biz farce "Simone" -- about a computer-generated actress taking Hollywood by storm because nobody knows she's not real -- lies a plot cobbled together from largely flat and uncreative moments.

The brainchild of inventive and otherworldly writer-director Andrew Niccol ("Gattaca," "The Truman Show" screenplay), who plucked the picture's concept out of the film industry's paranoid collective subconscious, "Simone" stars Al Pacino as Viktor Taransky, a washed-up and somewhat neurotic director whose last chance at making a big studio film has just walked off the set along with his petulant leading lady (Winona Ryder in a cameo).

But just as he envisions his career going off a cliff, a dying wacko computer genius and Taransky fan (Elias Koteas) brings the director a computer hard drive containing the culmination of his life's work: a program that creates a near-perfect, completely malleable, realistic simulation of beautiful girl. Called Simone (a contraction of Simulation One), in the confines of a computer she can walk, talk, flirt and cry with a single keystroke. She has a database of famous actresses' best performances to draw from for mannerisms and moods. She's utterly at Taransky's control and, of course, her fabricated "performances" can be digitally inserted into any scene of his movie, any way he chooses.

Continue reading: S1m0ne Review

Al Pacino

Al Pacino Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Comments Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Al Pacino

Date of birth

25th April, 1940

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.70


Advertisement
Advertisement

Al Pacino Movies

Misconduct Trailer

Misconduct Trailer

Ben Cahill is an ambitious lawyer with an overwhelming urge to see justice for those...

Manglehorn Trailer

Manglehorn Trailer

To most that see him, Manglehorn isn't exactly an enigma, he's a quiet man who...

Danny Collins Trailer

Danny Collins Trailer

1970s rocker Danny Collins (Al Pacino) has earned a reputation for himself as a sell-out....

The Humbling Trailer

The Humbling Trailer

"All the world's a stage, and the men and women merely players". Or so thinks...

Stand Up Guys Movie Review

Stand Up Guys Movie Review

Frankly, if you put Al Pacino, Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin in your movie, you...

Despicable Me 2 Trailer

Despicable Me 2 Trailer

Having hatched an evil plot to steal the moon in the first movie, Gru appears...

Stand Up Guys - Trailer Trailer

Stand Up Guys - Trailer Trailer

Doc is lifelong criminal who goes to meet his best friend Val when he leaves...

Advertisement
Despicable Me 2 Trailer

Despicable Me 2 Trailer

Following the evil schemes of Gru in 'Despicable Me' involving the hijacking of the moon...

Jack And Jill Trailer

Jack And Jill Trailer

Jack Sadelstein loves his family. He loves his wife, Erin and he loves his two...

The Son Of No One Trailer

The Son Of No One Trailer

Jonathan is a young cop with a loving wife and small daughter. He enjoys his...

88 Minutes Trailer

88 Minutes Trailer

Watch the trailer for 88 Minutes.Any person who is tasked with giving crucial evidence in...

Righteous Kill Movie Review

Righteous Kill Movie Review

Robert De Niro and Al Pacino -- has there ever been a better acting team?...

Righteous Kill Trailer

Righteous Kill Trailer

Watch the trailer for Righteous Kill.Al Pacino and Robert De Niro truly are one of...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.