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Al Pacino - Al Pacino and Jennifer Garner arriving on the set of 'Imagine' in Van Nuys - Van Nuys, CA, United States - Wednesday 31st July 2013

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Al Pacino and Tony Montana - Can you guess which celebrity made each particular eyepiece famous? - Wednesday 19th June 2013

Al Pacino and Tony Montana

Al Pacino Could Have Been A Star Wars Star – If He’d Understood The Plot


Al Pacino

Al Pacino turned down the major talk shows and newspapers, who were dying for an interview with the legendary actor. Instead, he hosted a Q&A show in New York, Sydney and now London.

The show would never be recreated; would never be screened. It was well and truly a one-off. Some of the things he said, though, have escaped the walls of the London Palladium. It turns out, Pacino, best known for his roles in The Godfather, Scarface and Dog Day Afternoon, could have been known for his roles in Star Wars and Die Hard. "Star Wars was mine for the taking but I didn’t understand the script," he admitted, according to The Evening Standard. "I’m not a very good judge of what’s good," he also said. We can’t really see it, Al, not in Star Wars, anyway. A role as the bad guy in Die Hard may have worked, but Harrison Ford and Bruce Willis nailed Han and John for us. He denied being offered the leading roles in Goodfellas, Midnight Cowboy and Misery, made famous by Robert De Niro, Dustin Hoffman and James Caan, though.

The insider gossip didn’t stop there. Apprently, "Michelle was a good kisser, Michelle Pfeiffer," he said, referring to their time on 1991's Frankie and Johnny. All in all, fans of film will have been enthralled by his talk, which included some off the cuff acting and his classic, dry sense of humour.

Continue reading: Al Pacino Could Have Been A Star Wars Star – If He’d Understood The Plot

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola - Al Pacino and Lucila Sola seen leaving their hotel in Central London - London, United Kingdom - Monday 3rd June 2013

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
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Al Pacino and Lucila Sola - Al Pacino and Lucila Sola at Heathrow Airport - London, United Kingdom - Monday 3rd June 2013

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola

Al Pacino - Celebrities leave The Ritz hotel - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 1st June 2013

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Al Pacino - Al Pacino leaving the Dorchester Hotel - London, United Kingdom - Friday 31st May 2013

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Al Pacino - Al Pacino is swamped by fans wanting an autograph as he leaves his hotel - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 30th May 2013

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Al Pacino - Al Pacino appears during his 'One Night Only' performance at the Seminole Hard Rock Live - Hollywood, FL, United States - Saturday 27th April 2013

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Al Pacino - Celebrities leaving the 8th Annual Los Angeles Italia Film, Fashion and Art Festival honoring Al Pacino - Los Angeles, United States - Sunday 17th February 2013

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Al Pacino

Al Pacino - The 8th Annual Los Angeles, Italia Film, Fashion and Art Festival honoring Al Pacino - Los Angeles, California - Sunday 17th February 2013

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Hot Tickets! US Movie Releases: Nicholas Hoult Stars In Zom Com 'Warm Bodies,' Stellar Cast Can't Save 'Stand Up Guys,' Another Stallone Doozy In 'Bullet To The Head'


Nicholas Hoult Teresa Palmer John Malkovich Christopher Walken Al Pacino Alan Arkin Sylvester Stallone

We’re going to ease in to our round-up of this week’s movie releases, by starting with the ‘above average’ and moving gently down the quality scale, to the truly awful. We already know, by the fact that Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters is riding high at the top of the box office, that there is literally no accounting for taste, so we will no longer try to influence your movie-going habits. We will simply present you with the facts and leave you to queue for your popcorn.

First up, Nicholas Hoult and Teresa Palmer star in Warm Bodies, a zombie comedy that gets the laughs from Hoult’s slightly unusual zombie character who decides to save a living human, rather than chomp down on her arteries for a nice snack. Of course, that living human happens to be an attractive young female, in the form of Teresa Palmer (who, for the record, looks a lot like Kristen Stewart in this movie). John Malkovich also stars in this zom-com, which is a little bit ‘Shaun of the Dead,’ (pretending to be a zombie? Been there, done that) but looks like an entertaining way to pass a couple of hours.

Richard Roper of Chicago Sun-Times came up trumps with the most enthusiastic review so far, writing “I kinda love this movie. "Warm Bodies" is a well-paced, nicely directed, post-apocalyptic love story with a terrific sense of humor and the, um, guts to be unabashedly romantic and unapologetically optimistic.” 

Continue reading: Hot Tickets! US Movie Releases: Nicholas Hoult Stars In Zom Com 'Warm Bodies,' Stellar Cast Can't Save 'Stand Up Guys,' Another Stallone Doozy In 'Bullet To The Head'

Al Pacino - Al Pacino At The Tribeca Grill New York City USA Thursday 17th January 2013

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Hot Tickets - US Movie Releases - The Hobbit Bound For Box Office Success, Save The Date Is A Rom-Com Let Down, Pacino And Walken Save Stand-Up Guys


Martin Freeman Peter Jackson Al Pacino Christopher Walken Alan Arkin

This week’s movie releases are an even-handed mix of big budget blockbuster, gentle rom-com and moving documentary.

Obviously, the big chatter is all about Peter Jackson’s latest movie, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, which has arrived to a great fanfare but received a mixed response, thus far. Thanks to the legions of fans hooked on the very thought of a Tolkein adaptation, The Hobbit will undoubtedly attract enough over-excited cinemagoers to bump it up the box office ratings and we will most likely see Skyfall slipping down the ratings chart.

Despite reports of movie fans vomiting in the aisles of their local movie theatres, with their stomachs unsettled by Jackson’s decision to film The Hobbit at 48 frames per second as opposed to the standard 24 frames per second, the film has just about escaped the wrath of the critics. Although the response to The Hobbit has hardly been a case of anyone shouting from the rooftops, bursting with praise, Martin Freeman has been widely praised for his performance as Bilbo Baggins, balancing the fine line that his character must tread between comedic and heroic.

Continue reading: Hot Tickets - US Movie Releases - The Hobbit Bound For Box Office Success, Save The Date Is A Rom-Com Let Down, Pacino And Walken Save Stand-Up Guys

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola - Al Pacino and Lucila Sola Thursday 11th October 2012 48th Chicago International Film Festival, opening night red carpet arrivals for the film "Stand Up Guys"

Al Pacino and Lucila Sola

Stand Up Guys - Trailer Trailer


Doc is lifelong criminal who goes to meet his best friend Val when he leaves prison following a long sentence, but little does Val know that his crime companion has been forced to kill him by his crook boss Hirsch. It doesn't take him long to realise, however, with Doc's sheepish presence constantly giving him away. The pair decide to enjoy themselves in the only ways they know how; theft, drugs and alcohol, before the time comes when Doc has to do the deed to save his own life. As the time draws nearer, he pleads with Hirsch for mercy, unwilling to shoot dead his best and only friend while Val repents for his sins in confession for the first time in 60 years in a bid to make his peace with God before he dies.

This crime comedy highlights friendship, unbreakable promises and sin as the main themes played out by a star-studded main cast. It has been directed by the Oscar winning actor Fisher Stevens in his second feature film after his 'Just a Kiss', and written by Noah Haidle in his first full length feature film and Dave Weasel his first ever feature film. It is set for release in the US on January 11th 2013.

Starring: Al Pacino, Christopher Walken, Alan Arkin, Julianna Margulies, Mark Margolis, Katheryn Winnick, Vanessa Ferlito, Addison Timlin, Bill Burr, Rick Gomez, Weronika Rosati, Eric Etebari, Courtney Galiano, Yorgo Constantine & Brandon Scott.

Continue: Stand Up Guys - Trailer Trailer

Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City Wednesday 12th September 2012 Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos and John C. McGinley Meet and greet with the cast of the Broadway play ‘Glengarry Glen Ross’, held at Ballet Hispanico. New York City, USA

Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Daniel Sullivan, Al Pacino, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, Al Pacino Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, Al Pacino Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, Al Pacino Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City
Bobby Cannavale, Al Pacino Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City

Al Pacino Monday 18th June 2012 50th Anniversary Gala to Honour Al Pacino held at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park, Manhattan - Outside arrivals

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Al Pacino Monday 18th June 2012 50th Anniversary Gala to Honour Al Pacino held at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park, Manhattan - Arrivals

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Al Pacino - Al Pacino, Lucila Sola Monday 20th February 2012 The Afterparty for the Irish Premiere of 'Wilde Salome' - Departures

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Al Pacino and Michael Madsen
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Al Pacino and Dublin International Film Festival - Al Pacino, Lucila Sola Monday 20th February 2012 Dublin International Film Festival - 'Wilde Salome' Premiere - Arrivals

Al Pacino and Dublin International Film Festival
Al Pacino and Dublin International Film Festival
Al Pacino and Dublin International Film Festival
Al Pacino and Dublin International Film Festival
Al Pacino and Dublin International Film Festival
Al Pacino and Dublin International Film Festival

Al Pacino and Palm Springs Convention Center Saturday 7th January 2012 The 23rd annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala at The Palm Springs Convention Center - Press Room Los Angeles, California

Al Pacino and Palm Springs Convention Center
Al Pacino, Jessica Chastain and Palm Springs Convention Center
Al Pacino, Jessica Chastain and Palm Springs Convention Center
Al Pacino, Jessica Chastain and Palm Springs Convention Center
Al Pacino and Palm Springs Convention Center

Al Pacino and Palm Springs Convention Center Saturday 7th January 2012 The 23rd annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala at The Palm Springs Convention Center - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Al Pacino and Palm Springs Convention Center
Al Pacino and Palm Springs Convention Center

Al Pacino Tuesday 3rd January 2012 A dishevelled Al Pacino wearing an ill-fitting blue satin trimmed tuxedo dinner jacket holds a brown paper bag while out and about in Beverly Hills. Los Angeles, California

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88 Minutes Trailer


Watch the trailer for 88 Minutes.

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...and Justice For All. Review


Very Good
Sorry to break it to you, but the line "The whole system's out of order!" does not appear in ...And Justice for All., Norman Jewison's send-up of the American legal system and one of the films with the most complicated punctuation ever to be released

The actual line that Al Pacino bellows out in the film's final scene, in case you're wondering, is this: "You're out of order! You're out of order! The whole trial is out of order! They're out of order!" Nah, doesn't quite roll off the tongue the same way, does it?

Continue reading: ...and Justice For All. Review

Cruising Review


Very Good
Were it not set in the gay underworld of its era, 1980's Cruising would be a largely unremarkable film. But provocateur William Friedkin did set it in this underworld -- a seedy, sex-filled shocker than must have had audiences in tears -- and thus it has become a cult classic, almost notorious, really.

The story is, by and large, traditional serial killer fare: Someone is stabbing gay men to death, often in lewd situations. The NYPD captain (Paul Sorvino) sends in Steve Burns (Al Pacino) undercover to ferret out the killer. The straight-edge Steve learns all about gay culture, in which pocket to put bandanas to indicate your proclivities, and so on. But by and large he's just supposed to "go out there and find the killer." But the undercover activity takes its toll on his psyche, most notably in his (non-gay) relationship with Nancy (Karen Allen, virtually the only woman in the film at all).

Continue reading: Cruising Review

Ocean's Thirteen Review


Very Good
The jazzy music, saturated-to-bleeding colors, and even the credits font make it clear from the outset: Ocean's Thirteen is more variety show than heist thriller. The gang of thieves from Ocean's Eleven and Ocean's Twelve is re-assembled, and while their new scam is more of a group effort than the scattered riffing of Twelve, its building-block cons are as cool and varied as ever.

Returning to the stage, the Ocean crew: Rusty (Brad Pitt) puts on scraggly facial hair to play a seismologist. Linus (Matt Damon) prepares to seduce a casino employee (Ellen Barkin), a task that, he insists, requires a prosthetic nose. Basher (Don Cheadle) mostly minds a giant piece of construction equipment, but impersonates a motorcycle daredevil on the fly as an elaborate distraction. The brothers Malloy (Casey Affleck and Scott Caan) are off to Mexico. George Clooney's Billy Ocean, as usual, acts as ringleader, which means a lot of standing around looking fabulous in suits, as well as one spectacularly well-timed eyeroll.

Continue reading: Ocean's Thirteen Review

Oceans Thirteen Trailer


Oceans Thirteen
Trailer Stream

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Dog Day Afternoon Review


Extraordinary
Attica! Attica!

I'd say they don't make 'em like Dog Day Afternoon anymore, but, you know, they sure do try to. Bank robbers under fire, hostage negotiations, panic in the streets. Why, moviedom is littered with films like Heat, Mad City, The Negotiator... some good, some bad.

Continue reading: Dog Day Afternoon Review

Insomnia (2002) Review


OK
Director Christopher Nolan, the auteur behind the masterful Memento, has made an odd choice for a follow-up, choosing to remake the Norwegian film Insomnia, which starred Stellan Skarsgård as a troubled cop investigating a murder north of the Arctic Circle, where the sun never sets. Nolan has kept the story intact, moving it 'round the Circle from Norway to Alaska, putting monster stars Al Pacino and Robin Williams in the lead roles... and telling the whole story backwards!

Okay, I'm joking about the backwards part, but to tell you the truth, this retread could have used it. It certainly needs a lot more than Pacino's overacting and cinematographer Wally Pfister's mood lighting to be watchable.

Continue reading: Insomnia (2002) Review

Carlito's Way Review


Extraordinary
Spitting in the face of the idea that criminals are simply nurtured by their environments, legendary gangster Carlito Brigante (Al Pacino, doing a vague approximation of a Puerto Rican accent) stands before a judge in the 1993 Brian De Palma film Carlito's Way and refuses to blame his criminal ways on his upbringing or the fact that his mother died when he was young: "The fact is, your honor, I was a mean little bastard when she was alive."

It's a rebuke to the environment-nurtures-criminals mentality that infused the previous De Palma/Pacino collaboration from 10 years earlier, Scarface, which stands as the bloody and exciting but frankly pretty immature younger brother to the more stately and ultimately more affecting Carlito's Way. The differences are obvious right from the film's opening gunshot: Carlito's been popped and is being wheeled away to the hospital, musing as he dies, "Don't take me to no hospital... Some bitch always pops you at midnight when all they got is a Chinese intern with a wooden spoon." The rest of the film is in flashback, starting with Carlito being let out of jail after serving only five years of a 30-year-sentence and leading back up to that gunshot.

Continue reading: Carlito's Way Review

Serpico Review


Excellent
Damn dirty cops! It's gonna take Frank Serpico to clean up this town!!!

Based on a true story of rampant corruption and internal affairs in New York City (where else?), Serpico stands as the consummate cop movie, right up there with The French Connection. But while The French Connection is a standard cops-and-robbers movie, Serpico is pretty much cops-and-cops, as Al Pacino's title character hunts out corruption inside the department even though it means all but signing his death warrant.

Continue reading: Serpico Review

Heat Review


Excellent
I hate to condone the making of 3-hour long movies, but Heat is one in which you're not going to fall asleep. Comparisons to Casino are going to be inevitable, with both hitting the 180-minute mark and starring Robert De Niro as a crook, but unlike that film, Heat manages to keep the interest level high throughout the whole picture.

Heat is the instantly gripping tale of a large-scale heist leader and die-hard loner named Neil McCauley (De Niro). As the film opens, he and his team of brutal, precision thieves (including Val Kilmer and Tom Sizemore) knock over (literally) an armored car for a stash of bearer bonds. On the case is Detective Vincent Hanna (Al Pacino), a troubled, angst-ridden veteran of the LAPD. Over the course of the film, McCauley and Hanna develop a strange sort of kinship, even as McCauley's crimes increasingly raise the stakes and Hanna's efforts to stop him become more and more desperate.

Continue reading: Heat Review

Any Given Sunday Review


Very Good
Football is as engrained in our society's mores as deeply as war, family values, and politics -- at least that's what Oliver Stone would like you to believe. To back up this statement, Any Given Sunday analyzes the effects of a culture that elevates professional athletes and coaches to a plateau where they are immortalized as heroes of the common man. Stone's football fairytale is a culmination of every anecdote, highlight, or soundbite you've ever seen associated with the pigskin, wrapped up in an aesthetically pleasing Christmas package, and sealed with a kiss from team owner Cameron Diaz. Stone aims to please, and he doesn't miss a single cliché of the revered and scrutinized American athlete.

At its core, Any Given Sunday is the story of Miami Sharks coach Tony D'Amato (Al Pacino - The Godfather, Dog Day Afternoon) and his two quarterbacks, Willie Beamen (Jamie Foxx - The Great White Hype, Booty Call) and Cap Rooney (Dennis Quaid - The Big Easy, Innerspace). The quarterback is the most vital position in the game. He is the team spokesperson and field chief, and he serves as a crucial link between coaches, administration, and players. When legendary two-time Pantheon Cup (aka: Super Bowl) champion Cap Bowman ruptures a disk after a bone crushing hit, coach Tony is left with Willie Beamen (Foxx), an athletic, yet untested QB. His team has lost four straight and appears to be plummeting in a downward spiral with the playoffs right around the corner. He's got delusional team owner Christina Pagniacci (Cameron Diaz) and sports analyst Jack Rose (John McGinley, doing his best Jim Rome impersonation) breathing down his neck because of his outdated coaching style, and a team of players he's losing control of.

Continue reading: Any Given Sunday Review

City Hall Review


Good
There's two things I dislike: politics and long, boring speeches. City Hall has plenty of both, and while Al Pacino is almost cool enough to make me think politics can be okay, it's got so many long speeches that I started looking for the remote control after the third or fourth one.

City Hall is a drama/thriller with most of the thrill sucked out of it. After a ridiculously convoluted opening, filled with the weak voice-over of the Deputy Mayor of New York City, Kevin Calhoun (John Cusack), we find ourselves embroiled in the world of Mayor John Pappas (Pacino). As the film opens, we find a cop and mobster killed in a shoot-out, taking with them the life of a six-year old boy.

Continue reading: City Hall Review

Gigli Review


Bad
That deafening sound you hear is negative buzz. Gigli just opened, and already it has plenty. Early test screenings started it. The media fueled it. And the release of the film may finally conclude our on-going fascination with A-list celebrity couple Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez.

For those who never tune into E! (shame on you), here's the backstory. Ben and Jen fell in love on the Gigli set. Fireworks off-screen, though, didn't translate to chemistry on-screen, and the movie was shredded by test audiences. Columbia originally planned to open Gigli in November 2002, but hesitated and shelved the film until now, which usually signifies disaster.

Continue reading: Gigli Review

People I Know Review


Weak
People I Know is a character study cum murder mystery that won't be known to many theatre patrons and won't be missed. It's a labored 24-hour journey with a worn-out New York publicist (also known as a press agent) struggling to maintain the residue of vitality he enjoyed in an earlier life. More characters in the story show him the admiration he once commanded than moviegoers are likely to. There's not much to admire.

The film starts with entrenched Big Apple dweller Al Pacino affecting a Georgia accent -- interesting, but no more required by the plotline than if he had come from Florida or North Dakota. About all the southern background does for his character, Eli Wurman, is provide an exaggeration to his promotional pushiness at one time, and slow, slurry speech to befit his character's drug-induced degradation at other times.

Continue reading: People I Know Review

Donnie Brasco Review


Very Good
Well, someone had to wrest the monopoly on gangster movies from the hands of Scorsese and Coppola. So why not Mike Newell, of Four Weddings and a Funeral fame, to direct it? And why not put Johnny Depp in a starring role? And Anne Heche -- you know, Ellen's girlfriend -- as his wife!? It sounds bizarre, but put this group together with Monster of Acting Pacino and Quiz Show scribe Paul Attanasio and you've got a pleasant surprise on your hands, not to mention one of the longest-running films at the box office this year. Long stuck in development because of GoodFellas, Donnie Brasco is in many ways a similar film, and in most of them better. The true story of FBI agent Joe Pistone, who in the late 70s infiltrated his way into the New York mafia to become a "made man" under the name of Donnie Brasco, Depp is surprisingly believable as an earnest father caught up in the mob mentality. Pacino shines as always, though it's not his usual character; here he's a tragic King Lear who just can't catch a break. But as for the iffy pan-and-scan job on the videotape, take a cue from the wiseguys: Fuggedaboudit.

The Merchant Of Venice Review


Very Good
When I heard that Al Pacino was playing Shylock in The Merchant of Venice, part of me was extremely skeptical. I was fearful he would bellow every other word ("If YOU prick US!"), which has been his acting technique for over a decade. Or, perhaps he would lapse into the Foghorn Leghorn accent that made The Recruit such a hoot.

It's been a crap shoot with the great actor for some time. Watching Pacino is like watching a beloved, over the hill athlete sticking around. He hobbles, the crispness of his movements isn't there, and the mixture of luck and confidence he once had is just a pleasant memory. More often than not, you just hope he just doesn't stumble. You just want a glimmer of what once was.

Continue reading: The Merchant Of Venice Review

The Godfather: Part III Review


Good
Why make another Godfather? While he gives it the old college try, Francis Ford Coppola fails to answer the question in The Godfather Part III, which picks up the saga of the Corleones decades later -- which finds Michael (Al Pacino) still unable to go legit. By 1990, he's near death (having heart attacks and whatnot), and he figures the Catholic Church is his best route to legitimacy. And wouldn't you know it, they're corrupt too. Well, you know, just when he thought he was out, they pull him back in...

While the film is well-acted (with the surprising exception of Diane Keaton reprising a role that wasn't all that interesting to begin with), masterfully lighted, and gorgeously photographed -- most notably the various shootout scenes -- it ultimately treads over old ground: material from the first two movies as well as repeating itself. This is most telling in the aforementioned shootouts -- the Atlantic City shoot-'em-up (courtesy of a helicopter outside) is horrifyingly grotesque (in a good way), but it seems more fitting for the histrionics of Scarface than the subtle and jaw-dropping one-two punch of Michael Corleone's assassination work at Louis' Italian-American Restaurant in The Godfather. Ultimately, the movie is simply one assassination after another -- and in Coppola's commentary track, he acknowledges this, placing much of the blame at the foot of the studio. It's also a testament to the amount of power that Coppola lost in the intervening decades -- again, something he acknowledges in the commentary.

Continue reading: The Godfather: Part III Review

The Godfather Review


Essential
I remember the first time I viewed The Godfather. It was 25 years to the day after its initial theatre release, and it was being re-realased, as many films were at the time, for their anniversary. So, trotting to the Mercer Mall General Cinemas on Route one (I literally trotted, I was without car and always looking over my shoulder for fear of getting run over by one of those infamous New Jersey drivers (of which I am a member)), I bought my ticket and proceeded to get the seat, front and center, as normal, in one of the smaller screens in the theatre. As I recall, the last movie I had watched in there was Night Falls on Manhattan with Richard Dreyfuss, Ian Holm, and Andy Garcia. I had seen the famous first moments before, knew the parodies of it back and front, but had never seen the film itself.

In Italian: Molto bene.

Continue reading: The Godfather Review

The Insider Review


Excellent
Listen up! A movie adapted from a magazine article about the making of a four-year old segment of a television program: Does this pitch have you hooked yet? No? Well, despite a potentially dry-as-dust premise, The Insider manages to rise above its inherent limitations and provides a compelling look inside the politics of 60 Minutes and the tobacco industry.

They say you should never see two things being made: Sausage and legislation. Add journalism to that list. I've been in this racket long enough to know that objectivity is painfully lacking in the places you expect to find it the most. Backroom deals make strange bedfellows of interest-conflicted parties (e.g. Time-Warner owns Entertainment Weekly magazine, which reviews Warner Bros. films, etc.) So when 60 Minutes producer Lowell Bergman (Pacino) decided to do a story about the hazards of cigarettes in 1996, he found himself embroiled in controversy.

Continue reading: The Insider Review

Glengarry Glen Ross Review


Essential
Pacino should have won an Oscar for his performance as a land salesman/con-man in this ensemble piece about what happens on the other side of the phone line during those late night sales pitches you get. In this case it's real estate (worthless, of course, though that's never stated) the sharks are selling. And they aren't really that good at it, either. Pacino's the rainmaker of the group, but supporting characters played by Jack Lemmon, Alan Arkin, and Ed Harris are struggling. When some breaks in to the manager's (Kevin Spacey) office and steals the good "Glengarry" leads, all hell breaks loose.

Who knew director James Foley had this movie in him. With credits from Who's That Girl? to Fear to The Corruptor, Foley hasn't made a passable movie before or since this 1992 production. Having a script by David Mamet (based on his stage play) doesn't hurt, nor does having at least two screen legends in the cast. Hell, even the minor characters are stellar. Jonathan Pryce's beaten-down mark is one of the most memorably pathetic losers on celluloid. Alec Baldwin's five minutes of screen time here is his greatest work ever.

Continue reading: Glengarry Glen Ross Review

The Devil's Advocate Review


Very Good
It takes a story this ridiculous to be this good. Imagine The Firm, but with the Devil. (Cue demonic laughter.) Keanu Reeves stars as a rising star of a lawyer, and Al Pacino stars as the Devil himself (sample line: "Call me dad!"). The movie plays perfectly into Pacino's penchant to overact the crap out of his part -- only this part has no limit to the attitude you can throw at it. The rest of the film is simply very well-made. Special effects, acting (particularly Charlize Theron as Keanu's sanity-vacating wife), music, set design -- it's all there. No, it ain't Oscar bait, it's just one, ahem, hell of a good time.

The Recruit Review


Good
Rarely do I have any trouble coming up with a way to lead into a movie review. But The Recruit has really thrown me a puzzle. Do I say something about its slick Hollywood production values and typically over-the-top performance by Al Pacino? Do I comment on its wealth of technical implausibilities? Or should I say something about how you should never trust a redhead, newbie spy James's (Colin Farrell) first obvious mistake in the film?

None of these leads really grabbed me, but then again, neither did The Recruit. It's a glossy and well-massaged thriller, designed to give you two hours of eye candy and gently massage your brain -- but not too much! After all, a fickle mass audience might be weighing their investment against the simplicity of Kangaroo Jack.

Continue reading: The Recruit Review

Scarecrow Review


Good
Hackman and Pacino? You better believe it. And while this odd mix of Of Mice and Men, Midnight Cowboy, and Waiting for Godot has several charming moments, it never really finds its groove. The loose story concerns the pair of drifters who hatch a plan to start their own car wash -- though that idea never really materializes. Instead, the ride the rails and the roads, waiting for life to happen to them. Both leads are fantastic, but the script is weak.

Scent Of A Woman Review


Excellent
Al Pacino got his ribbing for "hoo-ahhh!"ing his way through Scent of a Woman, but underneath the scenery chewing, there's a sweet and watchable film to be seen. Pacino is a blind ex-army man with skeletons galore, Chris O'Donnell is a prep school kid who's landed in some unexpected trouble and takes on a job watching Pacino over Thanksgiving. They learn from each other, just as each finds a way to save the life -- figuratively or truly -- of the other. Fun to watch.

Two For The Money Review


Weak
Two for the Money is so frustrating to watch because you can see it falling apart with every additional subplot, every misused actor, and every tectonic shift in the story. The script covers so much ground that by the halfway point you feel none of the loose ends will ever be satisfactorily completed. And sure enough, that's what happens.

Matthew McConaughey plays Brandon Lang, an ex-college quarterback whose ability to pick winning football teams grabs the attention of Walter Abrams (Al Pacino), a big-time New York City gambling advisor, whose apparent wealth and power is enough to convince Lang to skip Las Vegas for the Big Apple.

Continue reading: Two For The Money Review

Scarface Review


OK
To say that Al Pacino chews the scenery as Tony Montana, Cuban drug lord par excellence, doesn't really do justice to the performance. Pacino tears into his lines with a lust approaching frenzy, ripping through scenes with an animalistic fervor, creating a role that has already gone down in the books as one of the great, if not the greatest, portrayals of a gangster ever to hit the screen. It's also, watching some 20 years down the line, laughably campy in a manner that the rest of this bloated, self-important film doesn't seem to appreciate.

Pacino and producer Martin Bregman had a good idea in wanting to make an updated version of the original 1932 Scarface, which chronicled the rise and fall of a Prohibition-era Capone-like criminal overlord (screenwriter Ben Hecht was a Chicago journalist with a lot of intimate knowledge of Capone). Handing it over to director Brian De Palma (who had specialized mostly in psychosexual thrillers like Dressed to Kill and The Fury), and screenwriter Oliver Stone (whose credits included an Oscar for 1978's Midnight Express but also Conan the Barbarian), was a daring move. Stone did a lot of research for the screenplay, hanging out and doing coke with drug lords all over Latin America, and De Palma promised to bring a certain visual flair to the proceedings.

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The Panic In Needle Park Review


Good
Al Pacino isn't particularly searing in this urban heroin drama, a precursor to much better films like Trainspotting, which really pushed the genre. But credit must be given, I suppose, to pioneers like Needle Park, which has Pacino and Susan Dey-lookalike Kitty Winn dazed and frequently comatose through nearly two hours of drugging, culminating in an inevitable bust. More a character study than any kind of narrative story, it's moderately worthwhile but far from a classic.

The Merchant Of Venice Review


OK

In his bold, brusque re-imagining of William Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice," screenwriter and director Michael Radford ("1984," "Il Postino") has successfully solved one of the play's two inherent impediments -- its insensitive, arguably anti-Semitic caricature of the greedy, vengeful Jewish creditor Shylock, who demands a literal pound of flesh as payment for a defaulted loan.

Applying audacious creative license, Radford has reinvented the character as a tragic and more central figure -- played by no less than Al Pacino -- whose villainy is motivated by a sense of indignation for his treatment at the hands of bigoted gentiles. This "Merchant" is no longer a farce, but a drama thick with implications about the dangers of religious power in society.

Unfortunately, Radford's creativity with the Bard's narrative doesn't extend to renovating the film's weightless, transparently contrived primary plot about Bassanio (Joseph Fiennes), a young man who wishes to woo beautiful heiress Portia (uncommonly lovely Lynn Collins), but fears he hasn't the wealth to make the proper impression. These romantic aspirations lead his merchant-shipper best friend Antonio (Jeremy Irons) to securing the sinister, high-risk loan from Shylock on Bassanio's behalf.

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Gigli Review


Terrible

In what may go down as the most embarrassing, imprudent attempt at cleverly sexy dialogue in the history of cinema, the gangland romantic comedy catastrophe entitled "Gigli" features Jennifer Lopez coming on to Ben Affleck by asking to be orally pleasured with the line, "Turkey time! Gobble, gobble."

But it's not the line all by itself that makes this moment the cherry atop this dung-heap sundae of a movie that is nothing but bad moments. It's also the fact that Lopez is playing a lesbian -- one of those gorgeous, male-fantasy movie lesbians who just needed the right man to straighten her out.

And it's also the idea that this "right man" for a straight-curious, street-smart sappho could be an angry, dimwitted, pompadoured mook and inept mob-enforcer, played by Affleck with a bad Brooklyn accent (even though the character grew up in southern California) and the stink of churlish masculinity that comes from over-active testosterone glands and beer-deadened brain cells.

Continue reading: Gigli Review

Insomnia Review


Good

After a hit as inventive and novel as last year's narrative-bending "Memento," following up with a remake of something as commonplace as a cop vs. killer cat-and-mouser might seem a step down for director Christopher Nolan. But "Insomnia" was an unusual story before he even got his hands on it.

The 1997 original from Norway starred Stellan Skarsgaard ("The Glass House," "Good Will Hunting") as a detective whose ongoing sleep disorder became a psychological burden while investigating the cryptic murder of a teenage girl above the Arctic Circle, during summer when the sun is up 24 hours a day.

In Nolan's remake, Al Pacino plays the cop as a graying, threadbare detective with still-sharp instincts who has been given an extra bag of metaphorical bricks to carry around: He's in Alaska helping with this murder case until the heat of an ugly Internal Affairs inquiry dies down in his native Los Angeles.

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The Recruit Review


Weak

Spy movies generally fall into two categories: Intellectual thrillers or gadgets-and-stunts actioners. There's no point in expecting much more than amusement-park entertainment from the latter. But in a picture as ostensibly cunning as "The Recruit" -- about a rookie CIA spook hunting down a mole within the Agency -- the very least the filmmakers could do is not give away their supposed surprises with billboard-sized clues in every other scene.

From almost his first line of dialogue, secret agent headhunter Al Pacino drums home two points -- "nothing is what it seems" and "everything is a test" -- with such deliberateness that long before any real intrigue begins, the film's litany of elementary plot twists is stretched out on the screen like a road map.

Since Pacino's purportedly promising young apprentice, a pretty-boy MIT programming genius played by Colin Farrell ("Minority Report"), can't seem to read these signs, he spends most of the movie three steps behind any astute moviegoer. So it's more than a little hard to believe it when he's plucked from spy school to go undercover at CIA headquarters, working to weed out a double agent while pretending to be a washout trainee who settled for a data-entry job.

Continue reading: The Recruit Review

The Insider Review


Very Good

Leave it to "Heat" director Michael Mann to make a seat-gripping near-thriller about something as inherently dull as corporate whistle-blowing.

"The Insider" is a freely fictionalized retelling of the events that really got the ball rolling in the current attack on the tobacco industry: When a medical researcher for cigarette maker Brown and Williamson spills his guts to "60 Minutes," it puts CBS into in an ethical tailspin as lawyers come knocking with a broken confidentiality agreement in one hand and a lawsuit in the other.

I know what you're thinking: Yawn!

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Al Pacino

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Al Pacino

Date of birth

25th April, 1940

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.70


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Al Pacino Movies

Misconduct Trailer

Misconduct Trailer

Ben Cahill is an ambitious lawyer with an overwhelming urge to see justice for those...

Manglehorn Trailer

Manglehorn Trailer

To most that see him, Manglehorn isn't exactly an enigma, he's a quiet man who...

Danny Collins Trailer

Danny Collins Trailer

1970s rocker Danny Collins (Al Pacino) has earned a reputation for himself as a sell-out....

The Humbling Trailer

The Humbling Trailer

"All the world's a stage, and the men and women merely players". Or so thinks...

Stand Up Guys Movie Review

Stand Up Guys Movie Review

Frankly, if you put Al Pacino, Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin in your movie, you...

Despicable Me 2 Trailer

Despicable Me 2 Trailer

Having hatched an evil plot to steal the moon in the first movie, Gru appears...

Stand Up Guys - Trailer Trailer

Stand Up Guys - Trailer Trailer

Doc is lifelong criminal who goes to meet his best friend Val when he leaves...

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Despicable Me 2 Trailer

Despicable Me 2 Trailer

Following the evil schemes of Gru in 'Despicable Me' involving the hijacking of the moon...

Jack And Jill Trailer

Jack And Jill Trailer

Jack Sadelstein loves his family. He loves his wife, Erin and he loves his two...

The Son Of No One Trailer

The Son Of No One Trailer

Jonathan is a young cop with a loving wife and small daughter. He enjoys his...

88 Minutes Trailer

88 Minutes Trailer

Watch the trailer for 88 Minutes.Any person who is tasked with giving crucial evidence in...

Righteous Kill Movie Review

Righteous Kill Movie Review

Robert De Niro and Al Pacino -- has there ever been a better acting team?...

Righteous Kill Trailer

Righteous Kill Trailer

Watch the trailer for Righteous Kill.Al Pacino and Robert De Niro truly are one of...

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