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Captain America: Civil War Trailer


The Avengers are suffering from an image crisis. As much good that they do and as many lives that they save, the superheroes also cause unlimited amounts of damage to cities and civilisation. The government wish to find an answer to this problem and they decide that all superheroes should be registered and held accountable for their actions. 

Tony Stark is brought in to begin talks on behalf of The Avengers, knowing how much damage he's personally done under his superhero disguise, Stark see the government's point and decides that a register wouldn't be entirely unwelcome. Captain America on the other hand has no such wishes; The Cap sees any government intervention as something beyond reasonable requirement. In the middle of all this is Cap's old friend Bucky who could be prosecuted under the new laws. As The Avengers are forced to split into two halves, it looks like there's going to be no way for the old team to form any kind of agreement. 

 As their opinions deepen and rivalries are deepens, certain members of Hydra begin to tighten their control and their plans for future domination of the world are getting stronger. The Avengers must find a way to put their differences aside in order to beat the real enemy.

Alfre Woodard - 2015 Robert F. Kennedy Ripple Of Hope Awards - Arrivals at Hilton Midtown - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 8th December 2015

Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard

Alfre Woodard - 43rd AFI Life Achievement Award Honoring Steve Martin at the Dolby Theatre at Dolby Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 5th June 2015

Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard and Roderick Spencer
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard

Sheila Vand, David Harbour, Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman, Alfre Woodard, Cliff Chamberlain and Jennifer Salke - 'The Big Bash,' a fundraising party for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Los Angeles (BBBSLA) - Arrivals at Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Friday 24th October 2014

Sheila Vand, David Harbour, Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman, Alfre Woodard, Cliff Chamberlain and Jennifer Salke
Sheila Vand, David Harbour, Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman, Alfre Woodard, Cliff Chamberlain and Jennifer Salke
Sheila Vand, David Harbour, Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman, Alfre Woodard, Cliff Chamberlain and Jennifer Salke

Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman and Alfre Woodard - NBC & Vanity Fair's 2014-2015 TV Season Event at Hyde Sunset - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 17th September 2014

Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman and Alfre Woodard
Katherine Heigl and Josh Kelley
Katherine Heigl
Katherine Heigl
Katherine Heigl
Katherine Heigl

Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman and Alfre Woodard - Celebrities attend NBC & Vanity Fair 2014-2015 TV Season at Hyde Sunset Kitchen - Red Carpet Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th September 2014

Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman and Alfre Woodard
Katherine Heigl
Katherine Heigl and Josh Kelley
Katherine Heigl and Josh Kelley
Katherine Heigl and Josh Kelley
Katherine Heigl

Alfre Woodard - 2014 NBCUniversal Press Tour held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 13th July 2014

Alfre Woodard
Katherine Heigl and Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Katherine Heigl and Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard

Alfre Woodard and Blair Underwood - 2014 South African Tourism's Ubuntu Awards held at Gotham Hall - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 1st April 2014

Alfre Woodard and Blair Underwood
Alfre Woodard and Roderick Spencer
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard and Roderick Spencer
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard and Blair Underwood

Video - Michael Fassbender Attends '12 Years A Slave' NYFF Premiere - Part 2


Michael Fassbender was among the cast of historical biopic '12 Years A Slave' who attended the New York Film Festival premiere of the flick. He was joined by director Steve McQueen and main star Chiwetel Ejiofor.

Continue: Video - Michael Fassbender Attends '12 Years A Slave' NYFF Premiere - Part 2

Dule Hill and Alfre Woodard - World premiere of 'Michael Jackson One' at Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino - Arrivals - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 29th June 2013

Dule Hill and Alfre Woodard
Dule Hill
Dule Hill and Allison Janney
Dule Hill and Alfre Woodard
Dule Hill and Allison Janney
Dule Hill

Alfre Woodard Cinema For Peace Foundation's 2013 Gala For Humanity at the Beverly Hills Hotel - Arrivals Featuring: Alfre Woodard Where: Beverly Hills, California, United States When: 11 Jan 2013

Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard

Video - Taylor Swift, Jerry Springer And Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Arrive At The Kennedy's Ripple Of Hope Awards Dinner


Taylor Swift, Jerry Springer, Alec Baldwin and his wife Hilaria Thomas and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. were among the mass of arrivals for the 2012 Ripple of Hope Awards Dinner at The Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights in New York City.

Continue: Video - Taylor Swift, Jerry Springer And Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Arrive At The Kennedy's Ripple Of Hope Awards Dinner

Cast Of The New 'Steel Magnolias' Felt The Love On Screen


Queen Latifah Alfre Woodard Jill Scott Phylicia Rashad

With the remake of Steel Magnolias premiering this weekend (October 7th), it's been a tough task for the new actresses Queen Latifah, Alfre Woodard, Jill Scott and Phylicia Rashad to fill the boots of Sally Field, Shirley MacLaine, Dolly Parton and Olympia Dukakis. What made the original such a success, was the clear off-screen bond between the four actresses that translated in front of the camera for the 1989 film, but the current crop insist they're feeling just as close to one another.

"It's been a love fest," said Scott to The Press Association, adding that they'd have taken any role offered so as to get a chance to appear in a film that's original held a special place in her heart. "We connected immediately, so we didn't really have to fake being girls in the beauty shop," Latifah said. "We just bonded right away." Woodard meanwhile argued that the film was a true representation of what humanity is - that we all need community. "We are communal beings at the core," she said.

"As we've moved away from an agrarian culture to a metropolitan one, the only place you gather for community in that way is either at church or at a spot like a hair salon or barber shop. But at the church, you can't get real because you're trying to get right. You can actually be more of your loving self in the salon. You actually get more healing in the salon than in the church."


Roderick Spencer and Alfre Woodard - Roderick Spencer and Alfre Woodard Wednesday 3rd October 2012 attends the world premiere of the Lifetime Original Movie Event, Steel Magnolias held at the Paris Theater

Roderick Spencer and Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard, Adepero Oduye, Phylicia Rashad, Dana Owens, Queen Latifah, Jill Scott and Condola Rashad

Dinosaur Review


Weak
Leave it to Disney to finally come up with a family-friendly way to explore natural selection. Much like The Lion King's "Circle of Life," Dinosaur regales itself in survival of the fittest, only few people are going to be humming "Hakuna Matata" after this one.

For starters, Dinosaur is that rarest of Disney animation flicks which is not a musical. There's a thumping James Newton Howard score, but the only singing here comes from trumpeting iguanodons and brachiosaurs. The story, on the other hand, is typical Disney kiddie fare: Iguanodon Aladar (D.B. Sweeney) is orphaned as a wee dino-egg on a remote island, where he is raised, Tarzan-style, by a family of lemurs (er... okay). When a freak meteor strike blows the island away, along with much of the rest of the world, Aladar swims to the mainland with his lemur family on his back, where he meets up with the surviving herbivorous dinosaurs who have banded together to trek to "the nesting grounds," a Waterworld-style vale which hasn't been reduced to desert and ruins like, apparently, the rest of the earth. (And never mind the fallout; there is none...)

Continue reading: Dinosaur Review

Something New Review


Weak
More than 30 years ago, close-minded sitcom character George Jefferson dogged neighbors Helen and Tom Willis for partaking in an interracial relationship. The pint-sized loudmouth dubbed the duo a "zebra," and audiences howled with laughter because the notion of a mixed-race couple was relatively unfamiliar. By the time the television show went off the air in 1985, the joke had run its course.

So why is scripter Kriss Turner, a veteran of generic sitcom writing, attempting to blow the dust off the concept for newfound laughs? Turner's treatment for Sanaa Hamri's Something New pits races against each other to tell the often-turbulent courtship of Kenya (Sanaa Lathan), a black accountant, and Brian (Simon Baker), her white landscape architect. Color colors everything for this duo as they try to make a relationship work, and New overplays the racial chip on its shoulder to the detriment of the romantic date movie that's buried at its core.

Continue reading: Something New Review

Mumford Review


Very Good
Mumford reminded me how nice it is to forget yourself in the midst of a good story - Lawrence Kasdan's (The Big Chill, Grand Canyon) latest charm will keep you grinning. Speaking of smiles (and tangents), this is a great film for anyone who likes to look at mouths; I haven't seen so many close-ups of teeth and gums since the last time I went to the dentist!

Loren Dean (Enemy of the State, Apollo 13) does a decent job as Dr. Mumford, the most popular psychologist in the small town to which he just moved. Listening attentively to the tormented visitors of the treatment couch, his apparent peace of mind and even temper become infectious. Ubiquitously available and sounding less like a shrink than a wise uncle who gives just enough advice at just the right time, it's no wonder Dr. Mumford is everyone's favorite confidant. But will those he's helped to see through their own faults be just as understanding if they find out the truth of his past?

Continue reading: Mumford Review

Dinosaur Review


Weak
Leave it to Disney to finally come up with a family-friendly way to explore natural selection. Much like The Lion King's "Circle of Life," Dinosaur regales itself in survival of the fittest, only few people are going to be humming "Hakuna Matata" after this one.

For starters, Dinosaur is that rarest of Disney animation flicks which is not a musical. There's a thumping James Newton Howard score, but the only singing here comes from trumpeting iguanodons and brachiosaurs. The story, on the other hand, is typical Disney kiddie fare: Iguanodon Aladar (D.B. Sweeney) is orphaned as a wee dino-egg on a remote island, where he is raised, Tarzan-style, by a family of lemurs (er... okay). When a freak meteor strike blows the island away, along with much of the rest of the world, Aladar swims to the mainland with his lemur family on his back, where he meets up with the surviving herbivorous dinosaurs who have banded together to trek to "the nesting grounds," a Waterworld-style vale which hasn't been reduced to desert and ruins like, apparently, the rest of the earth. (And never mind the fallout; there is none...)

Continue reading: Dinosaur Review

What's Cooking? Review


OK
Indian filmmaker Gurinder Chadha's feminine feast drama What's Cooking? serves up the ingredients for a potential tasty meal, but the remaining aftertaste leaves much to be desired. In the film, Chadha (Bhaji on the Beach) concocts a multi-ethnic, estrogen-driven drama that overextends itself to hysteria. The notion of profiling a broad range of distinctive, Los Angeles-based families preparing for the Thanksgiving holiday makes for an entertaining sociological premise, but Chandra's concentration on these culturally diverse women and their loved ones feels strained and contrived. She tries gallantly to fortify this film with her brand of cinematic seasoning, but the characters come off as a bunch of overdramatic caricatures going through the prototypical TV-movie-of-the-week antics. Consequently, What's Cooking? is a flavorless fable that is as hard to swallow as a piece of tough turkey.

The film's families consist of African-American, Asian, Jewish, and Hispanic protagonists, all exaggerated characters who weave in and out of hackneyed plots. From the Jewish perspective, there's the tongue-tied matriarch Seelig (Lainie Kazan) who has an annoyingly cute way of enunciating certain words. Ma Seelig is somewhat speechless when she eventually gets to meet her daughter Rachel's (Kyra Sedgwick) lesbian lover Carla (Julianna Margulies, late of television's ER). Then there's the Spanish viewpoint where an estranged couple, the Avilas (Mercedes Ruehl and Victor Rivers), are forced to reunite upon the insistence of their adult children. There's also obvious tension when Vietnamese Jimmy Nguyen (Will Yun Lee) dares to play footsies with Hispanic Gina Avilas (Isidra Vega). And the black family the Williamses (headed up by Alfre Woodard and Dennis Haysbert) has issues as well.

Continue reading: What's Cooking? Review

Radio Review


Weak
HBO's cultish sketch-fest Mr. Show, in one of its more brilliant skewers of the entertainment business, did a hysterical mock movie awards show where all categories were for playing mentally challenged adults. The heart of the joke was the way the actors engaged in sickening self-congratulation for their "courageous" role choices.

Cuba Gooding Jr. deserves similar congratulations for his courage, not just for "playing retarded" in the titular role in Radio, but for most of what he's done since he won his own Oscar as jawboning jock Rod Tidwell in 1996's Jerry Maguire, a role in which his only devastating handicap was playing for the Arizona Cardinals. If not true fearlessness, it's hard to imagine what else can explain some of Gooding's recent script-picking decisions - Chill Factor, Instinct, Rat Race, Snow Dogs, and the execrable Boat Trip come to mind. Maybe he can't read.

Continue reading: Radio Review

Love And Basketball Review


Weak
Of all of the projects for Spike Lee to attach his name onto, Love and Basketball may go down as one of the most idiotic. Lee produced this Hoop Dreams meets Romeo and Juliet love story and his largest mistake by far was to hand the position of director over to Gina Prince-Bythewood. Prince may have made four films, but she still hasn't gotten it quite right. And, from the looks of it, she won't be getting it right anytime soon.

Love and Basketball concerns Monica Wright (Sanaa Lathan), a basketball loving girl who wants nothing more than to be the first woman in the NBA. Her next door neighbor, Quincy McCall (Omar Epps) is the son of a NBA player and wants nothing more than to follow in his father's footsteps and get some booty along the way. When he realizes (at about age 18) that the booty he has been wanting all along has been living next door, he quickly hooks up with her. Both find themselves going to USC and both find themselves on the USC basketball teams.

Continue reading: Love And Basketball Review

The Forgotten Review


Good
Wrap your brain around this one. It has been 14 months since grieving mother Telly Paretta (Julianne Moore) lost her son, Sam, in a plane crash that took the lives of 10 other children. She's been seeing a psychiatrist (Gary Sinise) on a regular basis, and the shrink has helped her cope with her sadness as the two discuss how difficult it is to let memories of loved ones fade.

Until one day, when all the physical mementos of Sam actually do disappear from Telly's life. Photo albums once filled with snapshots are now blank. Actual fade or Photoshop trick? Drawers that held baseball gloves and caps are now empty. Something wicked this way comes.

Continue reading: The Forgotten Review

The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review


Excellent
Considering that I have not watched a Nickelodeon show since Double Dare, I didn't know what to expect from The Wild Thornberrys Movie, based on a popular cartoon from the network. Surprisingly, the film is a hilarious adventure and I shamelessly enjoyed it. The primary audience for this one is kids 12 and under, but directors Cathy Malkasian and Jeff McGrath really took big kids like me into consideration when they put this animated extravaganza together. It features a fantastic score composed by Paul Simon, appropriate to its sub-Saharan setting and is accompanied by a splendid new song from The Dave Matthews Band. Its progressive themes of ecological preservation and racial tolerance also add to the warm tingly nostalgic feeling of the film, but it never gets too cheesy. Let's just say that the Disneyfication of this one is kept to a minimum. It even has a PG rating.

The story follows the Thornberrys, a hodge-podge British family of three generations all living in one souped-up trailer home, as they travel throughout the world documenting nature's wonders. Our protagonist is young Eliza (Lacey Chabert), who has been given a magical gift to talk to animals. Eliza is the quintessential loner, as she is more content with her animal friends than her family's rules and constantly seeks adventure. Along with her chimpanzee companion Darwin (Tom Kane), she manages to get into trouble when she recklessly takes the baby cheetah Akela past the safe boundaries of the desert. Sure enough, malicious poachers snatch up Akela from a helicopter, and despite Eliza's heroic efforts, she's unable to save the cub. Heartbroken and facing rebuke from her bewildered parents, Eliza is shipped off to boarding in school in England. Trapped in the confines of "civilization," Eliza vows to find the lost cheetah cub and to return to her family where she rightfully belongs.

Continue reading: The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review

The Singing Detective Review


OK
"I'm a prisoner inside my own skin." So says Dan Dark (Robert Downey Jr), hack novelist and lifelong sufferer of psoriatic arthropathy, a horrific disease that has left him with barely functioning limbs and an appalling welter of blisters and rashes over every inch of his body. Dark spews rage at everyone who comes near him, from his fed-up wife (Robin Wright Penn) to the gaggle of aloof doctors who occasionally drop by to put him on a different drug.

To get away from the misery of his day-to-day existence, Dark retreats into a 1950s film noir fantasy world straight from one of his books, where he's a handsome band singer who moonlights as a gumshoe. In the fantasy, he gets tangled up in a plot revolving around a dead blonde dame, the sinister Mark Binney (Jeremy Northam) who hires Dark to investigate her murder, and a couple of palookas in sharp suits (Adrien Brody and Jon Polito) who keep trying to bump Dark off. Unfortunately, the fantasy starts getting mixed up into Dark's real life - Chandler-esque gangsters showing up at his bedside, and hospital staff bursting into renditions of doo-wop hits that Dark's alter ego would have sung in an L.A. nightclub - and he has trouble keeping them separate.

Continue reading: The Singing Detective Review

Beauty Shop Review


Weak
Television shows spin-off characters all the time - Matt LeBlanc leaves Friends for Joey and Cheers gives way to Frasier. Not so in movies, where producers frequently tease similar spin-offs but rarely make the big-budget steps to actually get these projects off the ground. For every Elektra, for example, there are promised X-Men franchises waiting to be built around Wolverine and Magneto.

Bucking the odds, MGM's Beauty Shop spins off from the successful Barbershop comedies, taking Queen Latifah's sassy stylist Gina Norris from the second installment and setting her up in a potential franchise all her own.

Continue reading: Beauty Shop Review

Grand Canyon Review


Very Good
Lawrence Kasdan's Grand Canyon is as enigmatic as movies get. On the one hand, it's got a great cast, an ominous soundtrack, and Steve Martin burning through some of the best monologues on film ("All of life's riddles are answered in the movies!"). On the other hand, Kasdan's film is so hopeless and despairing that it's hard to ever properly embrace: In the space of two hours, Kasdan's characters get shot at, murdered, nearly carjacked, nearly seduced into adulterous affairs, shot for real, discover abandoned babies, and generally bemoan the horrors of modern life. Kasdan is intent on getting one point across and one only: America has gone to the dogs, as exemplified by the horrors of Los Angeles.

Continue reading: Grand Canyon Review

K-PAX Review


Good
It would be an exaggeration to say that there are no original ideas anymore, that every movie fits some formula we've seen before. But, ya know, the claim isn't that far off the mark, and if the shoe fits...

So the genre we're talking about in the case of K-PAX: A crazy man thinks he's an alien (a psychic, a king, etc.). The obvious question: Which is he: crazy, or an alien, or both? (A crazy alien, now that would be a fun twist on the whole genre wouldn't it?)

Continue reading: K-PAX Review

Love & Basketball Review


OK

An inspired labor of love about sports and romance in which the female lead is an athlete, too, "Love and Basketball" is one for the "why didn't anybody think of this before?" file.

For decades, the women in sports movies have to settle for being glorified cheerleaders while the men took all the glory as athletic heroes of various varieties. But writer-director Gina Prince-Bythewood sets this picture in the world of college basketball where the couple in question (played by Omar Epps and Sanaa Lathan) are both gifted ball players.

It's an idea whose time has definitely come, and what's more it makes for swell dramatic conflict since Quincy (Epps) has it easy as a heavily-recruited wunderkind and Monica (Lathan) is frustrated in her second-string role on the school's much-neglected women's team.

Continue reading: Love & Basketball Review

What's Cooking? Review


OK

A talented ensemble cast brings an extremely authentic family dynamic to "What's Cooking?," a satisfying four-course cross-section of ethnic American clans gathering for their Thanksgiving dinners.

Conceived by director Gurinder Chadha as a celebration of diversity, the film opens with an ironic shot of an advertisement on the side of a Los Angeles bus featuring an airbrushed white-bread family carving a turkey. Chadha then moves inside the bus to show the rainbow of races living together in the area, then on into a grocery store, where she picks up her first story in which a young Mexican-American man (Douglas Spain) bumps into his exiled father (Victor Rivers) and invites him home for Thanksgiving dinner.

This doesn't sit too well with his mother (Mercedes Ruehl), who had kicked Rivers out after discovering he'd had an affair. But she's prepared to make the best of it as her huge family gathers for their traditional daylong holiday preparations, mixing turkey with a cornucopia of Latino delicacies.

Continue reading: What's Cooking? Review

The Core Review


Unbearable

It would be a terrible shame if talented actors like Stanley Tucci, Delroy Lindo and Alfre Woodard have reached a point where money trumps professional pride. But I can't imagine any other reason they'd sign on to a half-witted, obscenely formulaic, huge-budget save-the-Earth sci-fi embarrassment like "The Core."

Almost exactly the same movie as "Armageddon" -- and almost as insufferable -- it features a handful of good-looking scientists and NASA astronauts who, instead of going into space to set off a nuke and save the world from a asteroid, travel to the center of the Earth to set off a nuke, thus restarting the dying molten core and saving the world from electromagnetic disaster.

The exact same shopworn characters die in the exact same order, some accidentally, some heroically to save the mission. The simplest laws of physics and even plain-as-day physical facts are utterly ignored (the nuke-the-core plan is based on two-dimensional thinking even though the Earth is -- duh! -- a sphere).

Continue reading: The Core Review

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Alfre Woodard Movies

Captain America: Civil War Trailer

Captain America: Civil War Trailer

The Avengers are suffering from an image crisis. As much good that they do and...

Mississippi Grind Movie Review

Mississippi Grind Movie Review

As the story snakes south through the United States along the Mississippi River, this movie...

Mississippi Grind Trailer

Mississippi Grind Trailer

Gerry's gambling addiction has gotten way out of hand. He's already lost everything in his...

Annabelle Trailer

Annabelle Trailer

Ed and Lorraine Warren are top paranormal investigators who popularly solved the case of the...

12 Years a Slave Movie Review

12 Years a Slave Movie Review

Much more than a film about 19th century slavery in America, this sharply well-told true...

12 Years A Slave Trailer

12 Years A Slave Trailer

Director Steve McQueen joins the stars of '12 Years A Slave' to praise the immense...

12 Years A Slave Trailer

12 Years A Slave Trailer

Solomon Northup was a well-educated man from a successful family living in upstate New York...

The Family That Preys Movie Review

The Family That Preys Movie Review

Tyler Perry is trying. Instead of sticking exclusively to the urban morality plays that made...

Dinosaur Movie Review

Dinosaur Movie Review

Leave it to Disney to finally come up with a family-friendly way to explore natural...

Something New Movie Review

Something New Movie Review

More than 30 years ago, close-minded sitcom character George Jefferson dogged neighbors Helen and Tom...

Mumford Movie Review

Mumford Movie Review

Mumford reminded me how nice it is to forget yourself in the midst of a...

Dinosaur Movie Review

Dinosaur Movie Review

Leave it to Disney to finally come up with a family-friendly way to explore natural...

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