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Carla Gugino, Adrian Grenier, Kevin Tsujihara and Kevin Dillon - Warner Bros. Pictures' L.A. Premiere of 'Entourage' held at The Regency Village Theatre - Arrivals at The Regency Village Theater, Regency Village Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 1st June 2015

Carla Gugino, Adrian Grenier, Kevin Tsujihara and Kevin Dillon
Carla Gugino, Adrian Grenier, Kevin Tsujihara and Kevin Dillon
Carla Gugino, Adrian Grenier, Kevin Tsujihara and Kevin Dillon
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - The Warner Bros. Pictures world premiere of 'San Andreas' held at the TCL Chinese Theatre - Arrivals at TCL Chinese Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 26th May 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Alexandra Daddario and Carla Gugino - Los Angeles premiere of 'San Andreas' held at TCL Chinese Theatre - Arrivals at TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 27th May 2015

Alexandra Daddario and Carla Gugino
Alexandra Daddario, Brad Peyton and Carla Gugino
Beau Flynn, Alexandra Daddario, Brad Peyton and Carla Gugino
Beau Flynn, Alexandra Daddario, Brad Peyton and Carla Gugino
Beau Flynn, Alexandra Daddario, Brad Peyton and Carla Gugino
Beau Flynn, Alexandra Daddario, Brad Peyton and Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino, Dwayne Johnson and Alexandra Daddario - A host of stars were photographed as they arrived for the World Premiere of 'San Andreas' which was held at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, United Kingdom - Thursday 21st May 2015

Carla Gugino, Dwayne Johnson and Alexandra Daddario
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - the World Premiere of 'San Andreas' held at Odeon cinema - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 21st May 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino, Dwayne Johnson, Alexandra Daddario and Kylie Minogue
Carla Gugino, Dwayne Johnson, Alexandra Daddario and Kylie Minogue
Carla Gugino

Kylie Minogue, Carla Gugino, Alexandra Daddario and Dwayne Johnson - San Andreas world premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals. at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 21st May 2015

Kylie Minogue, Carla Gugino, Alexandra Daddario and Dwayne Johnson
Dwayne Johnson, Carla Gugino, Alexandra Daddario and Kylie Minogue
Kylie Minogue
Kylie Minogue
Kylie Minogue
Kylie Minogue

Carla Gugino - The World Premiere of 'San Andreas' held at Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals at Leicester Square, Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 21st May 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Dwayne Johnson, Kylie Minogue, Alexandra Daddario and Carla Gugino
Dwayne Johnson, Kylie Minogue, Alexandra Daddario and Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - Spy Kids actress Carla Gugino goes shopping in Beverly Hills in matching tan coat and shoes - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 23rd April 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - Shots of a host of stars as they arrived for the 2015 CinemaCon which was held at Caesars Palace Hotel & Casino in Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 22nd April 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - A host of celebrities were snapped as they attended Warner Brothers' The Big Picture which was held at CinemaCon 2015 in Caesars Palace Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Tuesday 21st April 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - Opening day for Wolf Hall Part 1 and 2 at the Winter Garden Theatre - Arrivals. at Winter Garden Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 9th April 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - Shots of a host of stars as they arrived for the opening night of Broadway musical Gigi which was held at the Neil Simon Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 9th April 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - A variety of stars were photographed as they arrived at the 2015 Roundabout Theatre Company Spring Gala which was held at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 2nd March 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - Photographs of a variety of stars as they attended the 2015 FOX Winter Television Critics Association All-Star Party which was held at the Langham Huntington Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 18th January 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - 2014 National Board of Review Gala at Cipriani 42nd Street - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Tuesday 6th January 2015

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Patrick Stewart and Carla Gugino - A host of Hollywood's biggest stars were photographed as they arrived at the Palm Springs Film Festival Gala 2015 which was held at the Palm Springs Convention Center in California, United States - Sunday 4th January 2015

Patrick Stewart and Carla Gugino
Patrick Stewart
Patrick Stewart
Patrick Stewart
Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard
Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard

Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard - A host of Hollywood's biggest stars were photographed as they arrived at the Palm Springs Film Festival Gala 2015 which was held at the Palm Springs Convention Center in California, United States - Saturday 3rd January 2015

Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard
Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard
Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard
Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard
Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard
Patrick Stewart, Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard

Carla Gugino - Photos from the 2014 United Nations Equator Prize in which 25 local sustainable development solutions for people, nature and resilient communities are recognized, held in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 22nd September 2014

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - The New York premiere of August: Osage County held at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 12th December 2013

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Connie Britton and Carla Gugino

Carla Gugino - Premiere of 'August: Osage County' held at The Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 12th December 2013

Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino
Carla Gugino

Watchmen Review


Very Good

The year is 1985. The Cold War rages on. While serving his fifth consecutive term in the Oval Office, President Richard Nixon contemplates nuclear assault against an aggressive Soviet Union. Elsewhere, an egomaniacal villain unleashes a mysterious threat that promises to decimate several of the world's major cities. Help, meanwhile, is not on the way. The masked superheroes who used to protect our crumbling society are in exile, banned by Congress from practicing what's now believed to be vigilante justice. And our nation's top weapon -- a sky-blue, radioactive superbeing nicknamed Dr. Manhattan (Billy Crudup) -- has fled to Mars following a fight with his longtime girlfriend. He peacefully sits and contemplates whether humanity is worth saving.

Originally published by DC Comics in 1986, Watchmen is an anti-superhero diatribe set in a hellacious alternate universe imagined by writer Alan Moore (V for Vendetta) and artist Dave Gibbons. Twelve individual issues were bound into a graphic novel in 1987, and have been worshipped ever since by serious comic enthusiasts who consider Watchmen a watershed moment in the ongoing fight to legitimatize the art form. Depending on which timeline you follow, Hollywood has spent the better part of the last 20 years trying to adapt Moore and Gibbons' magnum opus from page to screen.

It was worth the wait.

It's somewhat appropriate for director Zack Snyder to accept the challenge of translating Watchmen to film. Like the proud but overmatched Spartans in Snyder's breakthrough smash, 300, he's waging a battle that can't be won. Whatever version he delivers, it will be compared to Moore's vision -- which means it's likely to disappoint the graphic novel's uncompromising fan base. Even Moore refuses to endorse any cinematic renditions of his work, believing film, as a medium, can't do his comic-book story justice.

He might be right. But I do think Snyder comes about as close to Moore's intent as we're likely to see in adapting the sprawling Watchmen into manageable, feature-length form. I liked what Snyder kept, and agree with what he left behind.

Using the green-screen tricks that brought 300 to life, Snyder deftly recreates Gibbons' grimy visuals, while screenwriters David Hayter and Alex Tse retain the bulk of Moore's plot. As Russia and the United States position themselves for potential nuclear holocaust, sociopathic superhero Rorschach (Jackie Earle Haley) investigates what he believes is a plot against members of his former crime-fighting team, The Watchmen. Following the brutal murder of The Comedian (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) -- Snyder takes Moore's carnage to extreme levels in this film -- and the alienation of Dr. Manhattan, Rorschach coaxes Nite Owl (Patrick Wilson) and Silk Spectre (Malin Akerman) out of retirement for one last case.

It goes without saying that your Watchmen experience should start with the actual comics. Moore stockpiled his dense and jaded adventure with prescient political commentary, pessimistic social observations, deep characterization, a sadistic pirate tale, and a squid that demolishes half of New York City. Even with a 162-minute run time, Snyder's film has to omit chunks of the source material. So long, pirates, and adios, squid. Plus, it's Moore's gift for narrative flow that impresses in the comics. The author gracefully interlocks multiple storylines that ping-pong from past to present, tying together an army of players who share a rich, twisted history of crime fighting.

Some of Snyder's contributions do miss the mark. Rorschach's gravely voice will be compared (unfavorably) to Christian Bale's Dark Knight bark. Speaking of, the comical fight choreography during a pivotal jailbreak scene is one "Wham!" away from being part of the vintage 1960s Batman television series. It's always convenient when rampaging bad guys can be subdued with one punch.

Call-to-arms classic-rock staples by Bob Dylan or Simon and Garfunkel also seem too obvious when paired with Moore's revolutionary material. And song selection actually degrades two important sequences: Dr. Manhattan's intervention in the Vietnam War, and Nite Owl's post-battle relations with a willing Silk Spectre.

But Snyder's largely faithful adaptation, while hardly perfect, boasts one key enhancement -- it has flesh-and-blood actors who bring tangible hopelessness and palpable hesitation to the story's very real pathos. Wilson and Haley triumph as mousy Nite Owl and his polar opposite, the delusionally confident Rorschach. They help offset Crudup's monotonous Manhattan and Matthew Goode's stiff turn as Adrian Veidt, reportedly the world's smartest man.

Moore and Gibbons posed a philosophical question in their graphic novel. Who watches the Watchmen? It's meant to address society's checks and balances, to debate who steps in when those we ask to lead have failed. But it can also be applied to this adaptation. Who will watch? And will they like what they see?

From my perspective, Snyder's Watchmen achieves two goals. It delivers a visually stimulating companion piece for dedicated fans. And it provides a portal for newcomers taking their first tour through Moore and Gibbons' thought-provoking but pessimistic universe. Their next step should be toward the bookstore, where the definitive version of Watchmen still waits.







I smooch blue people.

The Unborn Review


Terrible
In a world bereft of rationality, such as that of popular Hollywood, Odette Yustman could play the slightly-younger sister (or, heck, even twin) of somebody like Jessica Alba, and it's fitting that their careers seem to be synching up. Almost a year to the day after Alba started seeing ghosts from a pair of haunted peepers in The Eye, Yustman begins seeing ghosts because -- well, gosh, I don't know why -- in David S. Goyer's sophomore effort as writer/director, The Unborn.

Yustman plays Casey Beldon, a college student who suddenly begins seeing scorpions in her eggs, dogs with masks, and all sorts of other crazy things. Her doctor gives her the boring reason: genetic mosaicism, a retinal irregularity usually seen in twins. It takes her Holocaust-survivor grandmother (Jane Alexander) to root out the real, much more evil reason, and, as per usual, the Nazis are involved. The reason that creepy blue-eyed zombie child keeps following her around has something to do with experiments done on Casey's great uncle in Auschwitz that naturally turned him into a mythical Jewish demon named Dybbuk. And it's up to Gary Oldman, as a Rabbi, to exorcize the malicious bugger.

Continue reading: The Unborn Review

Even Money Review


Weak
Gambling can mess people up. I've ridden in enough cabs in Vegas to have heard plenty of those stories.

This is a movie about a few more of 'em: A father (Forest Whitaker), saddled with debt, begs his college basketball star brother to lose games to pay off his bookies. And perhaps more overdone: A blocked writer (Kim Basinger) hooks up with a failed magician (Danny DeVito) to learn how to play cards and lose her and her husband's (Ray Liotta) savings. Kelsey Grammar's crippled vice detective and Tim Roth's gangster add to the mix, reminding you just how much acting talent director Mark Rydell managed to accumulate for the movie, only to squander it on a messy script that ties these story fragments together haphazardly.

Continue reading: Even Money Review

The Lookout Review


Very Good
Joseph Gordon-Levitt has a soft baby face and a lanky frame, so it's easy to see why, Eight years after Third Rock from the Sun and 10 Things I Hate About You, he can still play teenagers. The surprise is that he can play them so differently. In The Lookout he's Chris Pratt, who starts off the movie as a cocky high school hockey player. After a car accident, though, Chris sustains brain damage that leaves him hollowed and frail, struggling, even more than most, through a mundane life.

Chris's condition isn't as neatly symbolic as Guy Pearce's inability to make new memories in Memento. Moments of clarity brush up against considerable fuzziness; Chris can remember people and places while forgetting how to heat up pasta sauce. Gordon-Levitt specializes in plain-sight, makeup-free transformations, and here he nails the wounded body language and muted frustration of a fallen jock idol, creating someone far removed from the equally vivid young people he played in Brick and Mysterious Skin.

Continue reading: The Lookout Review

The Lookout Trailer


The Lookout marks Academy Award-nominated screenwriter Scott Frank's (Out of Sight), directorial debut. 

Continue: The Lookout Trailer

Night At The Museum Review


Weak
Right around the time a monkey urinates on Ben Stiller's head, I came to terms with the fact that Shawn Levy's high-concept comedy Night at the Museum would choose the lowest road possible as it searched for scatological humor.

That Levy -- the pandering director responsible for this year's atrociously unnecessary Pink Panther installment -- would stoop to such levels doesn't surprise me. No, I'm more upset that it took me so long to begrudgingly accept that what could have been inspired fluff for the whole family is, in fact, is a silly parade of slapstick antics aimed at audience members age eight and under.

Continue reading: Night At The Museum Review

The One (2001) Review


OK
Jet Li has joined the dubious ranks of those martial arts stars playing opposite themselves in a film -- including Jackie Chan and Jean Claude Van Damme. But instead of playing a long-lost twin brother to himself as in the other films, Li's actually himself squared -- another version of Jet from a different parallel "universe." That's right: Only Jet Li can kick Jet Li's ass.

James Wong and Glen Morgan, the guys who brought us the cheesy but mildly entertaining Final Destination (as well as the wonderfully gruesome X-Files episode "Home"), flex their sci-fi/kung fu action muscles with The One. With Jet Li on board, the action side is in great shape. Unfortunately, they come up pretty emaciated on the sci-fi front.

Continue reading: The One (2001) Review

The One Review


OK
Jet Li has joined the dubious ranks of those martial arts stars playing opposite themselves in a film -- including Jackie Chan and Jean Claude Van Damme. But instead of playing a long-lost twin brother to himself as in the other films, Li's actually himself squared -- another version of Jet from a different parallel "universe." That's right: Only Jet Li can kick Jet Li's ass.

James Wong and Glen Morgan, the guys who brought us the cheesy but mildly entertaining Final Destination (as well as the wonderfully gruesome X-Files episode "Home"), flex their sci-fi/kung fu action muscles with The One. With Jet Li on board, the action side is in great shape. Unfortunately, they come up pretty emaciated on the sci-fi front.

Continue reading: The One Review

Miami Rhapsody Review


Excellent
Director David Frankel loves Woody Allen. Miami Rhapsody is "Woody" through and through, from the big band intro music to the Jewish characters to Mia Farrow's presence. This time around, Farrow plays the adulterous mother of Sarah Jessica Parker, whose monologue wanders through every conceivable aspect of love, marriage, and infidelity.

The supporting cast is fabulous: Paul Mazursky (father and adulterer), Antonio Banderas (receiving end of adultery), Kevin Pollak (adulterer with pregnant wife). You get the picture. The only failures here are supermodel Naomi Campbell as Pollacks's love interest, who couldn't act her way out of an insurance seminar, and Parker herself, whose comedic timing is never quite right. Some people are heralding Miami Rhapsody as Parker's breakthrough into mainstream acting. Don't count on it.

Continue reading: Miami Rhapsody Review

The Singing Detective Review


OK
"I'm a prisoner inside my own skin." So says Dan Dark (Robert Downey Jr), hack novelist and lifelong sufferer of psoriatic arthropathy, a horrific disease that has left him with barely functioning limbs and an appalling welter of blisters and rashes over every inch of his body. Dark spews rage at everyone who comes near him, from his fed-up wife (Robin Wright Penn) to the gaggle of aloof doctors who occasionally drop by to put him on a different drug.

To get away from the misery of his day-to-day existence, Dark retreats into a 1950s film noir fantasy world straight from one of his books, where he's a handsome band singer who moonlights as a gumshoe. In the fantasy, he gets tangled up in a plot revolving around a dead blonde dame, the sinister Mark Binney (Jeremy Northam) who hires Dark to investigate her murder, and a couple of palookas in sharp suits (Adrien Brody and Jon Polito) who keep trying to bump Dark off. Unfortunately, the fantasy starts getting mixed up into Dark's real life - Chandler-esque gangsters showing up at his bedside, and hospital staff bursting into renditions of doo-wop hits that Dark's alter ego would have sung in an L.A. nightclub - and he has trouble keeping them separate.

Continue reading: The Singing Detective Review

Snake Eyes Review


OK
It's not as bad as you've heard, but this De Palma/Cage thriller set entirely at a thrown boxing match in an Atlantic City casino blows multiple opportunities to have a lot of fun within its high-tech environs. Mediocre, but watchable.

Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over Review


Very Good
Companies have created a number of brain-numbing devices to milk the susceptible wallets of adolescents in recent years. From Playstation to GameCube to Xbox, it seems as if the companies are always releasing new video game systems, only pausing to develop new and improved systems. It's a wonder they haven't come up with a device that allows the gamers to enter the video game itself.

Now they have -- except the gamers will have to drop their controllers for a few hours to catch Spy Kids 3-D in order to experience it. This is the movie video gamers have been waiting for, designed specifically for short-attention spans -- it's loaded with stimulating effects, nonstop action sequences, and, best yet, a journey inside a very cool video game in 3-D! It goes without saying that Spy Kids 3-D might be the only movie this summer with enough charisma to get your kids to leave their consoles -- so take advantage of it.

Continue reading: Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over Review

Michael Review


OK
I have a theory about Michael. Take Groundhog Day, substitute William Hurt for Bill Murray. Substitute Travolta as an angel for the groundhog. Take out all the time travel stuff. Oh, and take out the funny stuff. Same movie.

Spy Kids 2: The Island Of Lost Dreams Review


OK
Robert Rodriguez is slowly losing his luster as a unique filmmaker. Since his ultra-low-budget El Mariachi became one of indie film's biggest successes, Rodriguez has created some masterful works such as Desperado and From Dusk to Dawn while delivering such monstrosities such as The Faculty (three words: Harry Knowles cameo) and one segment of the ungodly Four Rooms. Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams stands as Rodriguez's biggest disappointment in his sporadic career, a homogenous and formulaic attempt in continuing the exploits of master spy kids Carmen (Alexa Vega) and Juni (Daryl Sabara) Cortez in their pursuit of truth and justice before bedtime.

This time around, Carmen and Juni are in competition with a rival Spy Kids duo of Gary Giggles (Matthew O'Leary) and his sister Gerti (Emily Osment, sister of Haley Joel) for top assignments and duties. When Juni is falsely accused of failing to save an antimatter device from the hands of the evil Dr. Romero (Steve Buscemi) and his brood of magnetic men, he is fired from the Spy Kids network. Alas, his ingenious sister Carmen hacks his Spy Kid status and re-assigns them to the mysterious island home of Dr. Romero in pursuit of the antimatter device.

Continue reading: Spy Kids 2: The Island Of Lost Dreams Review

The Center Of The World Review


Excellent
At a time when filmed eroticism between intelligent, complex adults is at something of a nadir, Wayne Wang comes along with the sexiest film in quite some time. The Center of the World deals with themes of loneliness and sexuality, and how the two are (or are not) intertwined.

Peter Sarsgaard plays Richard, a typical (almost stereotypical) techo-geek who made a million dollars the year prior and is about to make a lot more through an IPO. We are introduced to him and Florence (Molly Parker) as they check into a hotel suite in Las Vegas. Through a series of flashbacks, we learn that Richard recently met Florence, a freckled stunner, at the strip club where she works. Within five minutes, Wang sets the film's tone by having Parker perform an act that eliminates any chance for an R rating -- a shocking act for a lead actress in a mainstream film, and one that suggests that freedom of sexuality is a major issue here (and that Parker is an actress with few boundaries).

Continue reading: The Center Of The World Review

She Creature Review


OK
Where did this very strange movie come from? Certainly it was never in theaters... which might be explained by its plot oddity, about a couple (Rufus Sewell and Carla Gugino) who encounters a captive mermaid and figures she might be their ticket out of the land of low-rent carnies. Oh, and it's a period piece and a psychological thriller of sorts. Utterly baffling, it's still oddly watchable if for no other reason than to try to figure out what accent that is that Gugino is trying to emulate during her many monologues.

Continue reading: She Creature Review

Judas Kiss Review


Good
Intrigue and sexiness mix together in Judas Kiss, just not very well. Carla Gugino, Gil Bellows, Simon Baker, and Til Schweiger make an unlikely band of scam artists-cum-kidnappers, but it's cop partners Alan Rickman and Emma Thompson (both with outrageously bad New Orleans accents) that really make you wonder who the hell cast this thing. Tons of stars, including Hal Holbrook in an exceptionally over-the-top role, make this movie fun but unspectacular.

Sin City Review


Good
Innovative and dazzling in its absolute loyalty to thevisual style of its inspiration, "Sin City" brings comic bookpages alive to a degree that is unprecedented in movie history.

A triptych of dark, violent tales set in a fallen cityof corruption and grime, the film is a collaboration between film directorRobert Rodriguez (of "Desperado" and "SpyKids" fame) and graphic novelist FrankMiller (responsible for the gritty reinventions of Batman and Daredevil),whose unique touch in the unusual role of co-director is unmistakable.

Pages from the "Sin City" books were clearlyused as storyboards for the stunning, stark black-and-white cinematography,which features exclamation points of illustrative color: the golden tressesof a beautiful femme fatale, white-on-black silhouettes, red splashes ofblood from brutal murders that occur just out of frame.

His influence can also be felt (along with that of Rodriguezpal Quentin Tarantino, who is curiously credited as a "special guestdirector") in the "Pulp Fiction"-like plot structure thatlends itself well to the interconnected short stories, each of which makeup in atmosphere what they sometimes lack in profundity.

Continue reading: Sin City Review

Spy Kids Review


OK

One of the bad guys in the cool juvie adventure flick "Spy Kids," is a PeeWee Herman meets Willie Wonka meets the Wizard of Oz wacko who -- when he's not trying to take over the world -- hosts his own super-surreal Saturday morning kiddie show from an ominous funhouse fortress built atop a craggy oceanic rock outcropping.

His name is Fagan Floop and he's played by sublime scene-stealer Alan Cumming ("GoldenEye," "Titus"), who seems to put his arm around every audience member and give them each a giddy, wicked little wink as he kidnaps the world's top secret agents and diddles with their DNA, turning them into the uncanny, toy-like Technicolor mutants that populate his TV show.

Two of his hostages are Gregario and Ingrid Cortez (Antonio Banderas and Carla Gugino), ex-super-spy adversaries who fell in love while on assignment to kill each other. They traded in their gadget belts for a normal life as suburban parents, but when agents start disappearing they're called back into service.

Continue reading: Spy Kids Review

The One Review


Good

If popcorn-picture auteur John Carpenter made martial arts flicks, they'd be just like "The One" -- an unabashedly cheesy, B-grade sci-fi amusement park ride with half-price special effects, action movie in-jokes, and Jet Li, a star with more charisma and cheap one-liners than acting ability.

As intentionally serio-comical as Carpenter's "They Live" (Rowdy Roddy Piper vs. aliens that walk among us) or his "Escape from..." pictures (leather-clad bad-ass Kurt Russell chewing scenery in post-apocalyptic New York and L.A.), "The One" is a parallel universe yarn in which an evil Jet Li goes dimension-hopping to kill his doppelgangers counterparts.

He's already killed "himself" in 122 out of 123 known realities, absorbing their life force to become super-human along the way. If he kills the last one, he'll become all-powerful -- or possibly make all reality implode, who's to say?

Continue reading: The One Review

The Singing Detective Review


Good

Ironically, "The Singing Detective" probably would have been better without the awkwardly integrated songs that signal frequent shifts into fantasy for the picture's acrimonious anti-hero -- a second-rate pulp novelist hospitalized with literally crippling, full-body psoriasis that serves as a metaphor for his rampaging inner demons.

As an acerbically droll psychological drama about the writer's noir-fiction imagination slowly seeping into his tormented reality, this new adaptation of the highly acclaimed 1986 BBC miniseries (both were written by the late Dennis Potter) has many layers of mesmerizing Freudian substance, brought vividly to life by Robert Downey, Jr's fearlessly hostile but slowly warming performance.

Playing Dan Dark -- a bitter soul trapped in a grotesquely scabby, arthritic body -- Downey seethes with such animosity toward the whole world that when his doctors break into a low-budget production number lip-sync of "At the Hop" or his ointment-applying nurse (Katie Holmes) coos "Mr. Sandman" in a sexual daydream sequence, the film overshoots its intended farce because such silliness is so out of character for a man this bitter and full of bile.

Continue reading: The Singing Detective Review

Spy Kids 2: The Island Of Lost Dreams Review


OK

Getting by on little more than its contagious charm, "Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams" has about three-quarters the fun of its spry 2001 predecessor -- but it's a rushed, slapdash, sequel-for-the-sake-of-a-sequel with less than half the plot and ingenuity.

Taking place some time after the cartoonish espionage adventures of the first film has lead to the creation of a Spy Kids division within the OSS (what that stands for goes unexplained, even in the press kit), Part Two picks up in the middle of a rivalry between hero spy kids Carmen and Juni Cortez (Alexa Vega and Daryl Sabara reprise the roles) and impudent, bratty upstarts Gary and Gerti Giggles (Matt O'Leary and Emily Osment).

The Giggles horn in on the Cortezes' rescue of the U.S. president's equally bratty daughter (Taylor Momsen) from an wild amusement park ride run amuck in the movie's opening scene, then get assigned to a coveted mission by their father Donnagon Giggles (Mike Judge, creator of "Beavis and Butthead"), a crooked agent who is appointed OSS director over Carmen and Juni's father (Antonio Banderas).

Continue reading: Spy Kids 2: The Island Of Lost Dreams Review

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Carla Gugino Movies

The Space Between Us Movie Review

The Space Between Us Movie Review

While the premise of this movie makes it look like a sci-fi adventure, the truth...

The Space Between Us Trailer

The Space Between Us Trailer

Set in the near future, 'The Space Between Us' is an exploration of the very...

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The Space Between Us Trailer

The Space Between Us Trailer

Gardner Elliot isn't like average 16 year old boys, he's lived on a small colony...

San Andreas Movie Review

San Andreas Movie Review

Set up as an old-style disaster movie with only a fraction of the plot, this...

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San Andreas Trailer

San Andreas Trailer

California is well-known for playing host to regular earthquakes, being located right on top of...

New Year's Eve Movie Review

New Year's Eve Movie Review

The team that made the thin-but-enjoyable Valentine's Day in 2010 reunites for another massively overextended...

I Melt With You Trailer

I Melt With You Trailer

Jonathan; Ron; Richard and Tim met at college 25 years ago and have been friends...

New Year's Eve Trailer

New Year's Eve Trailer

On New Year's Eve, there is no better place to be than New York. All...

Mr. Popper's Penguins Movie Review

Mr. Popper's Penguins Movie Review

Yes, this movie is just as silly as it looks, with Jim Carrey pratfalling all...

Mr. Popper's Penguins Trailer

Mr. Popper's Penguins Trailer

Tom Popper is a sales man, it's all he knows and is great at his...

Sucker Punch Movie Review

Sucker Punch Movie Review

There are so many layers of fantasy in this eye-catching filmbut we never see any...

Faster Movie Review

Faster Movie Review

With a comically masculine vibe, this grisly rampage of revenge is inventive enough to hold...

Sucker Punch Trailer

Sucker Punch Trailer

Zack Snyder has described his latest film Sucker Punch as Alice in Wonderland with machine...

Faster Trailer

Faster Trailer

The last bank robbery Driver committed left him with a heavy prison sentence and the...

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