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Colin Hanks - 2016 Tribeca Film Festival - 'Elvis & Nixon' - Premiere at Tribeca Film Festival - New York, United States - Monday 18th April 2016

Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks

Elvis & Nixon Trailer


Who would've thought that Elvis and Richard Nixon would become allies? When Elvis sporadically showed up at The White House, it was completely unexpected. He was the biggest pop star in the world and there he was, at the gates of The White House unannounced.

Under the advice of one of his top aides, Nixon is a talked into meeting with The King Of Pop. Nixon needed a boost in popularity and for him to be seen as becoming friends with America's most loved star would be a perfect photo op for The President.

Elvis is accepted and taken into the building; him and his security sidekicks are searched and relieved of their firearms. Whilst speaking with Egil Krogh, Elvis is run through a few of the certain White House protocols that one must follow on meeting the president, protocols Elvis is quick to cast aside. The reason behind this meeting was kept entirely secret, but now we'll learn about Elvis' aspirations to take on a new mission unlike anything he's ever done before.

Continue: Elvis & Nixon Trailer

Colin Hanks - People's Choice Awards 2016 - Arrivals held at the Microsoft Theatre L.A. Live at Microsoft Theatre L.A. Live, People's Choice Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 6th January 2016

Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks

Colin Hanks - An evening with 'Life In Pieces' at The Paley Center for Media - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 15th December 2015

Colin Hanks

Colin Hanks , Busy Phillips - Premiere of Mister Lister Film's 'Consumed' at the Laemmle Music Hall - Arrivals at Laemmle Music Hall - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 11th November 2015

Colin Hanks and Busy Phillips
Colin Hanks and Busy Phillips
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks

Colin Hanks , wife Samantha Bryant - All Things Must Pass Premiere held at Harmony Gold Theatre at Harmony Gold Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 16th October 2015

Colin Hanks and Wife Samantha Bryant
Colin Hanks and Wife Samantha Bryant
Colin Hanks and Wife Samantha Bryant
Colin Hanks and Wife Samantha Bryant

Colin Hanks - 'All Things Must Pass' premiere at the Harmony Gold Preview House at Harmony Gold Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 15th October 2015

Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks and Rita Wilson
Colin Hanks and Rita Wilson
Colin Hanks and Rita Wilson
Colin Hanks and Rita Wilson
Colin Hanks and Rita Wilson

Colin Hanks - CBS, CW And Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - West Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks

Colin Hanks - The CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 10th August 2015

Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks

James Brolin, Colin Hanks , Zoe Lister Jones - Celebrities attend the CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center. at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

James Brolin, Colin Hanks and Zoe Lister Jones
Dianne Wiest and James Brolin
Dianne Wiest and James Brolin
Dianne Wiest and James Brolin
Dianne Wiest and James Brolin
James Brolin

Colin Hanks - 2015 NHL Awards held at MGM Grand Garden Arena inside MGM Grand Hotel & Casino - Arrivals - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Wednesday 24th June 2015

Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks and Samantha Hanks
Colin Hanks and Samantha Hanks
Colin Hanks
Colin Hanks

Parkland - Clips


On November 22nd 1963 in Dallas, Texas, the hugely adored President John F. Kennedy was shot to death as he arrived in the city with First Lady Jackie Kennedy. A women's clothing manufacturer named Abraham Zapruder had no idea of the events that would unfold as he set up his camera preparing for Kennedy's arrival; no idea that his footage would be seen by millions repeatedly as the only visual evidence for what took place that day. Few people know anything about this man, or indeed the other people who ended up becoming involved in this historic tragedy, such as the doctors and nurses who were forced to perform immediate life-saving attempts even with their initial shock and devastation, and the family of alleged killer US Marine Lee Harvey Oswald.

This historical drama tells the stories of the lesser known figures who became involved with one of the most famous assassinations in the history of the world ahead its 50th anniversary. It has been directed and written by Peter Landesman who is best known for his sex slavery article 'The Girls Next Door' which was published in the New York Times. 'Parkland' will be released in UK theatres on November 8th 2013.

Click here to read: Parkland Movie Review

Colin Hanks Welcomes His Second Daughter, Charlotte


Colin Hanks Tom Hanks

Colin Hanks is a dad once again, with his wife Samantha Bryant giving birth to their baby girl earlier this week. The 35-year-old actor told People magazine the good news on Tuesday (July 2), releasing a statement that read, “Ms. Charlotte Bryant Hanks has decided to join us. She’s as happy and healthy as we are overjoyed and tired.”

Colin Hanks Wife
Congratulations to Colin and Samantha

The husband and wife have been together for some years and got married in 2010, having their first child a year later. The former Dexter star already has a daughter, 2-year-old Olivia Jane, and had kept their second pregnancy under wraps for some time, with Bryant only announcing the pregnancy in April. She was spotted sneaking out of a showing of Tom Hanks' - Colin's father - Broadway play Lucky Guy and was asked about her expanding waistline by a paparazzo.

Continue reading: Colin Hanks Welcomes His Second Daughter, Charlotte

High School Trailer


Straight-A student and valedictorian Henry Burke is set to gain a scholarship into university, things really couldn't be better for him. However when he finds himself in detention it brings on a chance meeting with one time friend and prominent stoner Travis Breaux that leads to another chance meeting, this time with Mary Jane. His first time with the drug looks to be a positive one, however this is soon marred the next day as his school principle institutes a zero policy drug policy and administers a mandatory drug test for all students.

Henry is caught between two opinions: fail the drugs test, get expelled and lose his scholarship to MIT or team up with Travis to beat the system. Not wanting to jeopardise his future without a fight, the duo team up to steal a high powered blend of ganja from law student turned drug dealer Psycho Ed and spike the school bake sale's brownie supply, getting the whole school - faculty included - to a whole new level of stoned. With every brownie consumed the boys have to contend with the intoxicated student body as well as an enraged Psycho Ed who really starts to live up to his name as he tails the pair for stealing his stash. The stakes are high as they must find a way to keep their half-baked plan from going up in smoke.

Starring: Adrien Brody, Michael Chiklis, Colin Hanks, Cody Longo, Adhir Kalyan, Matt Bush, Mykelti Williamson, Sean Marquette,  Yeardley Smith,  Michael Vartan,Curtis Armstrong, Luis Chavez, Alicia Sixtos, Mary Birdsong, Julia Ling, Camille Mana, Brett Kelly, Andrew Wilson, Erica Vittina Phillips, Joseph Julian Soria & Nadine Crocker 


Director: John Stalberg

The Great Buck Howard Review


OK
How can a film that features a lofty tribute to The Amazing Kreskin before the end credits go wrong? Well, in Sean McGinly's sweet and mushy comedy The Great Buck Howard, the film doesn't really go wrong... but then it doesn't really go right either.

The film celebrates the D-list world of third-rate celebrities, celebrities whose popularity has waned, whose 15 minutes of fame were over a long time ago, with one-night stands not in Vegas or L.A., but Bakersfield and Akron.

Continue reading: The Great Buck Howard Review

The House Bunny Review


Very Good
In The House Bunny, Anna Faris looks significantly more glammed up than when she came into movies as the star of Scary Movie. In that film, she was stuck in a poor man's Neve Campbell role by design -- a spoof of a minor star, a winking knockoff. Faris stayed through the franchise throughout four installments, and coming out the other side, she still plays bimbos and cast-offs like Shelley Darlington, a second-string Playboy bunny who has turned 27 without hitting centerfold, and is summarily ejected from the Playboy mansion.

But years of scene-stealing in both indie movies and lowbrow comedies have refined Faris's approachable goofiness, and she finds an original, star-quality approach to playing a cheesy sex bomb. As Shelley, Faris widens her eyes (or as Shelley refers to them, "the nipples of the face") as if she's struggling to see through her own blissful daze, and speaks with a breathy, earnest tone. She's superficial and bubbleheaded, but doesn't have a malicious bone in her toned body; Faris finds comedy in her innocent belief in the healing togetherness of the Playboy fantasy. Shelley's attempts at sexiness are so goofy that they go back around and become sexy again.

Continue reading: The House Bunny Review

My Mom's New Boyfriend Review


Weak
Grown-up son living at home becomes angry and frustrated when his mom brings a new guy into the picture. Wait, didn't I just see this movie? Literally, a week ago?

Turns out My Mom's New Boyfriend has some differences with Mama's Boy, though it sticks closely to the overall shoddy quality level. This time out it's not a straight-up case of a son feeling betrayed. Writer/director George Gallo (DysFunktional Family) throws in a crime caper too. Henry (Colin Hanks) hasn't seen Mom (Meg Ryan) in three years due to his undercover duties as an FBI agent. When he returns home with a fiancee (Selma Blair), he finds that Mom hasn't just lost hundreds of pounds, she's also turned into a raving sexual lunatic, too. No sooner has Henry made his old bed than Mom gets mixed up with Tommy (Antonio Banderas), a known art thief... who Henry's been assigned to spy on!

Continue reading: My Mom's New Boyfriend Review

Untraceable Review


Bad
It would be wonderful if this review of the newest cyber-torture-stalker-thriller could begin with the words "Untraceable is unwatchable," but sadly that would be a lie. Our tastes have very simply become too degraded over the years for us not to have become used to it as studios have continued to shove out purposeless dreck like this. Call it a formula inoculation, as the films keep coming, with only the slightest noticeable tweaks to their dependable structure (as necessitated by the latest spasms in popular culture that allow a soupcon of relevancy to creep in), we very simply get used to it, no matter how awful.

And awful it is. In a desperate bid to glom on to the Internet's evergreen supposed hipness, the script (a lifeless accumulation of the expected by a trio of writers who really should know better) puts us inside an FBI cyber-crime unit where flint-eyed but tender-hearted agent Jennifer Marsh (Diane Lane) tracks down the worst of the online worst. Stirring from her bank of computer monitors only to get coffee or crack wise with fellow agent Griffin Dowd (Colin Hanks), Marsh is your prototypical wounded female cop with a young daughter and fretful mother at home, and a dead husband in her memory. (If her character had been male they'd have given her a bad temper and a drinking problem, but at least the sarcastic partner bit is gender neutral.) She gets put on the kind of case that (literally) only exists in the movies. Some psycho sets up a website called "Kill With Me" whose hook is that the more people view it, the quicker the subject on camera dies by some fiendish means. The first time out, it's a kitten; after that a person, and then another, and then another...

Continue reading: Untraceable Review

Alone With Her Review


Good
The voyeurism of the film camera has been a handy device in queasy-stomach thrillers from Peeping Tom to Halloween, bringing the audience into the position of the attacker as he steadily advanced on a victim (female and nubile, of course) and practically making them a part of the assault that followed. While some directors (like Powell in Peeping Tom) may have used this device as a Hitchcockian method of indicting the viewers for their sweaty-palmed need to watch, in the hands of John Carpenter and his followers it was something much more basic: the vicarious thrill. It's the resolute abandonment of any such thrill-seeking that makes Eric Nicholas' indie stalker experiment Alone with Her so brave. This is the rare film of its kind that dares to not give the pervs in the audience what they really want: a helpless, dehumanized female victim offered up for the slaughter.

This is doubly impressive, given how stacked the deck is against the woman being stalked in Alone with Her, as Nicholas has constructed his film so that every single shot is from the lens of a camera either carried or worn by the stalker, or planted in the woman's apartment. Amy (Ana Claudia Talancón) is never seen from anybody's perspective but that of Doug (Colin Hanks), who first spots her in a park while he's out gathering footage of women. Once his lens locks onto her, it never leaves, circling in closer and closer. It isn't long before Doug has broken into Amy's apartment and hidden small cameras everywhere, all of them feeding continuously back to his computer. And so we watch as he creeps incrementally into her life, striking up a conversation at the coffee shop she frequents about a film he just saw (knowing that she had just rented it the night before). To Amy's eye, Doug's just a harmlessly cute and geeky guy who she happens to have surprisingly a lot in common with, and Nicholas builds the story so painstakingly that there are times when the audience is almost able to believe the same.

Continue reading: Alone With Her Review

11:14 Review


Good
Car crashes seem to be ripe material for screenwriters looking for a hook to hang their movies on. From Intersection to Crash to Crash (the other one), this seems to be a well-travelled genre. 11:14 adds another notch in that post, a Rashomon-like story of a half-dozen characters who all intersect on one quiet road at 11:14 PM, which results in the loss of at least one life, one male member, a lot of cash, and endless property damage. The immediate before and after of the event contain even more chaos, including a gunshot wound for Hilary Swank.. The film tells each story in sequence, each time adding a little more context to this bizarre series of events, and each time causing us to care a little bit less about what exactly happened. It's not terrible filmmaking, but the plot's "cleverness" will hardly knock your boots off.

Whatever It Takes Review


Very Good
I sat down to write this review with a gleeful sparkle in my eye, anticipating the bitter contempt I would quickly unleash on the entire cast and crew of Whatever It Takes, citing an array of blunders ranging from laughable dramatic moments to a disappointingly predictable adaptation of the already over-used plot movements of Cyrano de Bergerac. Then I remembered Porky's and had a change of heart.

Whatever It Takes is actually a solid pinning of the high school romantic comedy. There's nothing especially original about its plot or characters, but most of its target audience won't notice. Basically, what we have here is the standard boy-wants-girl-but-she's-out-of-his-league-so-his-friend-coaches-him-and-she's-gullible-enough-to-fall-for-it picture. The twist is that this is a two-way exchange. Ryan Woodman (Shane West) is a supposedly geeky high school senior lusting after popular girl Ashley Grant (Jodi Lyn O'Keefe -- She's All That). Chris Campbell (James Franco of Freaks and Geeks) is a dumb but popular jock looking to bed Maggie Carter (Marla Sokoloff), the smart-but-undervalued hottie who lives next door to Ryan. So the two begin a completely unsurprising story arc in which the two most prominent teenage girl stereotypes fall for every line in the book without ever suspecting a thing.

Continue reading: Whatever It Takes Review

Orange County Review


Very Good
Forget She's All That and its brethren. Back in the 1980s, the maestro of teen films -- John Hughes (The Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles) -- taught us to produce films in the finicky teen-comedy genre. His simple rule -- a single motivation is required for all main characters: lots and lots of angst. Just create a simple story of teenagers yearning to escape the downtrodden existence of childhood and the microcosm of high school, and success is surely guaranteed.

Life has been good for Shaun Brumder (Colin Hanks) in simple Orange County, California. He's a good kid with a love of catching waves, a sweet girlfriend, and despite his eccentric family, life is always like riding six-foot waves that curl for days. After a freak surfing accident drowns one of his best buds one summer, Shaun begins to reassess his life and inspiration strikes one day in the form of a novel by Marcus Skinner. He decides to become a writer, trades in his surfboard, improves his grades, and waits for his acceptance letter from Stanford College to study under his new idol Skinner. But when Stanford rejects him due to a guidance counselor's mistake, Shaun only has 24 hours to fix the problem and get the hell out of O.C. to follow his dreams and work out the angst.

Continue reading: Orange County Review

Get Over It Review


OK
Get Over It at least has one thing that a lot of other high school movies don't: earnest, affable leads. It also has all of the key flaws that make going to teen movies so risky: an almost unbearable goofy streak, a plot with the strength of a newborn fawn, and bland supporting characters.

The movie makes the same mistakes over and over and eventually drains one's patience, but yet I stuck around because the leads played kids I would have liked to know.

Continue reading: Get Over It Review

Orange County Review


Good

Somewhere inside the surprisingly fresh, sharply jocular, angst-of-youth comedy "Orange County" there's a trite, typical teen movie struggling to get out. But director Jake Kasden just keeps out-witting the monster, pulling the carpet out from under its inherent clichés and giving his characters the chance to breathe and break free of their stock moldings.

A screwball affair about a bookwormy high school beach bum from the SoCal 'burbs who thinks his life is over when he doesn't get into Stanford, this flick rises above the spiritless, increasingly insipid, cookie-cutter teen genre simply because Kasden ("Zero Effect") and screenwriter Mike White ("Chuck and Buck") cared enough to try a little harder.

Played with pitch-perfect Everykid exasperation by sublimely expressive string bean Colin Hanks (son of Tom), Shaun Brumder had his heart set on pursuing his literary aspirations under the tutelage of his favorite writer, a professor at the venerated campus. So when he finds out his rejection was the fault of an inept guidance counselor (Lily Tomlin -- in the first of several inspired cameo performances) who sent the wrong transcript, Shaun goes on a dogged mission to get the decision reconsidered.

Continue reading: Orange County Review

Whatever It Takes Review


Unbearable

Another lowest-common-denominator high school romance made from the cannibalized parts of equally unambitious teen fare, "Whatever It Takes" stakes its bottom-feeder comedy ground almost immediately with a student assembly scene in which the school nurse (Julia Sweeney in a career low) demonstrates condom application on a five-foot phallus.

And it's all downhill from there.

Ryan (Shane West from TV's "Once and Again") and Maggie (Marla Sokoloff, the secretary on "The Practice") are next door neighbors, best friends and lonely hearts. She's sweet and dead sexy but can't find a beau, apparently because her IQ is larger than her bra size. He's one of those handsome movie "geeks" (illustrated mostly by the fact that he plays the accordion), hopelessly stuck on arrogant, air-headed Ashley (Jodi Lyn O'Keefe), the Prettiest Vixen in School.

Continue reading: Whatever It Takes Review

Get Over It Review


Weak

After Miramax jettisoned all remnants of integrity and started trafficking in assembly-line teen fare, a pattern began to emerge. Once or twice a year the studio would release another insipid high school or college romance starring the phenomenally talentless Freddie Prinze, Jr. -- a bland, blue-eyed magnet for 14-year-old girls. The happy endings always involved girls lowering their standards and/or taking back their pig boyfriends, and it seemed Miramax went out of its way to give each movie the blandest possible title like "She's All That," "Down To You" and "Boys and Girls."

This year's model is called "Get Over It" (the original title, "Getting Over Allison," was apparently deemed far too creative), and while it's still utterly forgettable and mostly unoriginal, at least somebody was making an effort this time.

That somebody would be Tommy O'Haver, the cleverly twinkly hand behind the zestful gay romantic comedy "Billy's Hollywood Screen Kiss." He cast genuinely capable actors like Ben Foster ("Liberty Heights"), playing the picture's generic lovelorn high school boy, and Kirsten Dunst, playing his best friend's sister -- the girl he inadvertently falls in love with while trying to win back his childhood sweetheart (adorable newcomer Melissa Sagemiller).

Continue reading: Get Over It Review

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Colin Hanks Movies

Elvis & Nixon Movie Review

Elvis & Nixon Movie Review

This movie is based on a real meeting between Elvis Presley and Richard Nixon in...

Elvis & Nixon Trailer

Elvis & Nixon Trailer

Who would've thought that Elvis and Richard Nixon would become allies? When Elvis sporadically showed...

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Parkland Movie Review

Parkland Movie Review

This starry drama has documentary realism going for it, although without a single well-developed character...

Parkland Trailer

Parkland Trailer

On November 22nd 1963 in Dallas, Texas, the hugely adored President John F. Kennedy was...

Parkland Trailer

Parkland Trailer

When Abraham Zapruder, a women's clothing manufacturer from Texas, excitedly set up his camera to...

Super Buddies Trailer

Super Buddies Trailer

What would the world be like if dogs turned into super heroes? On a regular...

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