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Wonder Woman Trailer


Diana Prince is a goddess and princess of the Amazons. She lives her life surrounded by strong women who know how to fight, so she is more than fascinated when a US Army Pilot called Steve Trevor washes up on the shore of her island paradise after a plane crash. She nurses him back to health and learns that he is fighting a huge war in the rest of the world, and it's then that she learns her true destiny. She wants to save the world at any cost, and it will cost her dearly. She returns home with Trevor and learns the ways of the women in his life, particularly those of his kooky secretary Etta Candy, but she uses her magical weapons and out-of-this-world fighting skills to protect her new friends and end the war for good.

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Wonder Woman Trailer


Diana is a princess and one of the best fighters on the island she was raised on. Her homeland was very different to what we know, it's a beautiful paradise inhabited only by women and Diana herself was brought to like by the mighty god Zeus. When a body washes up on the shore of the island, Diana cannot believe what she sees, a man has somehow found his way to their land and is in need of help.

Nursing the his back to help, the two bond and Diana learns that the man, an American pilot by the name of Steve Trevor was flying a plane when he crashed and found himself at her mercy. Steve regales many tail about the outside world and tells Diana of a catastrophic world war that's currently happening.

Moved by the pilot's stories, much to the dismay of the queen, Diana decides to leave her homeland and help fight with the Allies. The new outer world is a completely different place for Diana and she soon sees that life is very different for women outside of her normal environment. Demonstrating her fierce fighting method and lasso and sword skills, the superhero learns that her abilities are needed to protect the humans and must only be used for the greater good.

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Chris Pine Spills On 'Wonder Woman' Role And Reveals Film's WWI Setting


Chris Pine Gal Gadot Patty Jenkins Connie Nielsen

Chris Pine is gearing up for his role in the much anticipated Wonder Woman movie, which stars Gal Gadot as the super-heroine. Pine will play Steve Trevor, a military man and Wonder Woman’s love interest in the film, which the actor confirmed will be set during World War I.

Chris PineChris Pine will play Steve Trevor in the upcoming Wonder Woman movie.

"It’s a period we don’t see often; it’s usually World War II," Pine told the Toronto Sun. "Our costume design is incredible. We have scenes with, like, 500 extras all in period dress. I’d never been on a film with extras casting as beautifully done as it is here.”

Continue reading: Chris Pine Spills On 'Wonder Woman' Role And Reveals Film's WWI Setting

Perfect Sense Review


OK
This high-concept apocalyptic thriller starts well, with a lush visual style and strong performances. But Danish screenwriter Aakeson immediately writes himself into a corner: the story and characters have nowhere to go beyond bleak acceptance of the inevitable. So it's difficult to care what happens.

A mysterious illness sweeps the world causing people to experience horrible grief before losing their sense of smell. This creates a challenge for Glasgow chef Michael (McGregor), but that's easy compared to the next epidemic: terror followed by the loss of taste. So with his assistant (Bremner), he experiments with temperature and texture to keep customers happy. Meanwhile, Michael falls for Susan (Green), an epidemiologist trying to figure out what's happening.

People are adjusting to the changes, but the next wave involves rage and hearing loss. How long can human resilience endure?

Continue reading: Perfect Sense Review

Battle In Seattle Review


OK
In Woody Allen's Bananas, a group of American soldiers are being airlifted to the mythical Latin American country of San Marcos in order to quell a revolution. One soldier asks another which side they are fighting for and he responds, "This time the CIA is not taking any chances; some of us are for and some are against." This political bedlam is reflected in actor Stuart Townsend's hot-wire Battle in Seattle, when one cop muses to another, "Let me get this straight. Yesterday we were not supposed to arrest anybody. Now, we're supposed to arrest everybody."

Battle in Seattle is a high-octane depiction of the World Trade Organization riots in Seattle, Washington in late November 1999, where motives and duties are contradictory, confused, and unsettled. The non-violent protest groups end up embroiled in the very violence they abhor. Seattle Mayor Tobin (Ray Liotta) wants to appeal to the law-and-order police and to the protestors. (The night before the demonstrations he shows up both at a rally for the WTO and a rally against the WTO.) The law enforcement officials attempt to maintain the peaceful protest while at the same time chafing at the bit and waiting to crack heads. When violence erupts at the WTO protests, all the groups scatter and run blindly in all directions, and the National Guard appears to mop it all up.

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Brothers (2004) Review


Excellent
In an intelligent psychological drama, director/co-writer Susanne Bier shows us some sure-footedness in developing a complex story and engaging us with characters that make the traumatic stress disorder resulting from war revealing. Though her film doesn't entirely avoid some clichés and borders on melodrama, it doesn't spoil the timely interest of its core subject and the level of tension that it generates.

Add to that a fine ensemble cast to bring us into it. The two brothers of the title are Michael (Ulrich Thomsen), a career military man who seems to excel at everything, and his no-good brother Jannik (Nikolai Lie Kaas, Reconstruction), for whom Michael is both a role model and an impossible standard to live up to. Jannik's love and respect for Michael, on the other hand, is intertwined with the rebelliousness that comes of this inadequacy. To make the point and to make the relationships clear, the film starts with Michael picking Jannik up when he's released from prison and suggesting, on the ride home, that he should apologize to the victim of his crime. Such propriety. Jannik's prison time wasn't adequate punishment for Michael's high standards.

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The Ice Harvest Review


Good
Harold Ramis hasn't been kind to his own reputation in the last few years. One of the few uncontested great comedy filmmakers, he's diluted his resume with serviceable but still watery products like Bedazzled and the unfortunate duology of Analyze This and Analyze That. So while his newest, the Christmas noir comedy The Ice Harvest isn't Ramis's best work, it's also the sharpest thing he's done since Groundhog Day and hopefully the sign of more interesting things to come.

With a heart as black as exhaust-stained slush, The Ice Harvest is based on a novel by that jolliest of writers, Scott Phillips (A Simple Plan). Taking place over one long, frozen and grimy Christmas Eve in Wichita, it all starts with Charlie Arglist (John Cusack), a lawyer for the local crime syndicate, handing off a bag to his cohort, Vic Cavanaugh (Billy Bob Thornton), the bag containing over $2 million they stole from the Kansas City boss, Bill Guerrard (Randy Quaid). Vic hides the money and he and Arglist split up for the night, aiming to get the hell out of town in the morning. Being a noir patsy, Arglist proceeds to drink, draw far too much attention to himself, flirt with the local fatale (Connie Nielsen, dead wrong for the job at hand), and get more and more suspicious about Vic's motives. Paranoia ensues when one of Guerrard's gunsels starts poking around the seedy joints that Arglist has been hanging out in.

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Demonlover Review


Weak
In the cutthroat world of pornographic Japanese animé, she who remains most ruthless wins. At least, that's about as much of an overriding theme as I could glean from Olivier Assayas' visually vivid but narratively scatterbrained Demonlover, a film that begins as a pseudo-thriller concerning espionage at a French conglomerate and ends as an indecipherable mish-mash of technological paranoia and fetishized sex and violence in the Videodrome (and, unfortunately, FearDotCom) mold.

Alternating between French and English, the film hinges on the duplicitous dealings of Diane de Monx (Connie Nielsen), a merciless businesswoman who kicks things off by drugging a fellow employee in an effort to move up the corporate ladder. Now firmly ensconced as second in command at the Volf Group, Diane begins negotiations with animation giant TokyoAnimé, the world's largest and most successful producer of high quality sex cartoons. Diane is, in fact, a double agent working for rival firm Mangatronics, who - recognizing that a deal between Volf and TokyoAnimé would put them out of business - have hired her to sabotage the ongoing talks between the two companies. Unfortunately, despite a veneer of poker-faced iciness, someone is on to Diane's plans, and she suspects that either her antagonistic coworker Elise (Chloë Sevigny) or hunky negotiating partner Hervé (Charles Berling) is the villain attempting to blackmail her.

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Gladiator Review


Good
"Joey, do you like movies about gladiators?" Hey, who doesn't!?

The awe-inspiring trailers for Gladiator may have you dreaming of Spartacus and Ben-Hur, but you may be surprised to find this film in reality a less palatable mélange of Braveheart and Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome. This isn't altogether a bad thing, but those expecting a new Roman epic that will stand the test of time (like Spartacus and Ben-Hur) are in for some surprises.

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Soldier Review


Weak
Just how many times has Paul Anderson seen Dune? I mean, when you find yourself on a planet with massive wastelands, lots of sandstorms, and one person who leads the social group that he's not originally from to safety or some such crap, doesn't that remind you of a certain David Lynch film circa 1984?

Maybe if he was in Lynch's territory it would have turned out better. Anderson, director of Mortal Kombat and Event Horizon, set his sights on making his "sci-fi masterpiece" with a human element this time by setting himself down to work on a good premise movie, and ended up screwing that up, which you'd figure would be easy. If he'd made it out of studio, tried the independent road, the film might just have turned out quasi-semi-decent, instead of ye load of crap which we see before us now. But he decided to stay with the high paycheck security of a movie that relies on being blind and not noticing the plot holes that are large enough to walk through.

Continue reading: Soldier Review

One Hour Photo Review


Weak
Trust nobody, even those who provide such simple services as developing that roll of film from your beloved child's birthday party. You never fully know the lives of those who provide the basic needs of life, and what you overlook could be highly dangerous. The supposed innocuousness of those only tangentially connected to you in daily activities is an interesting premise to start with, but One Hour Photo falls short of revealing anything intriguing about human nature. After a fascinating starting point, it follows the straight and narrow of easily recognizable human flaws, practically boring itself in the process with one punctuated brooding scene after another.

See, Sy (Robin Williams) is the friendly neighborhood photo developer. He leads a lonely life, but finds solace in the happy portraits he's produced for his customers over the past 11 years. Becoming specifically attached to the Yorkins (Connie Nielsen and Michael Vartan) because Nina has actually smiled and yapped with him, his obsessive tendencies are pushed into high gear when he finds their home isn't as picture perfect as it seems.

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The Devil's Advocate Review


Very Good
It takes a story this ridiculous to be this good. Imagine The Firm, but with the Devil. (Cue demonic laughter.) Keanu Reeves stars as a rising star of a lawyer, and Al Pacino stars as the Devil himself (sample line: "Call me dad!"). The movie plays perfectly into Pacino's penchant to overact the crap out of his part -- only this part has no limit to the attitude you can throw at it. The rest of the film is simply very well-made. Special effects, acting (particularly Charlize Theron as Keanu's sanity-vacating wife), music, set design -- it's all there. No, it ain't Oscar bait, it's just one, ahem, hell of a good time.

The Hunted Review


Weak
Director William Friedkin has a great track record for examining his characters' inner turmoil as they battle the forces of good and evil. Friedkin is best known for pitting a mother, a detective, and a priest against the devil inside the little body of Linda Blair in The Exorcist. But some of Friedkin's best work can be seen in the action thriller The French Connection, where he transcends the raw power of the action film genre into something highly sophisticated and thought provoking. Thematically, The Hunted is comparable to Connection. However, those expecting Friedkin to deliver another quality action picture like Connection will be sorely disappointed.

The film opens during the war in Kosovo as highly trained hand-to-hand combat assassin (or "tracker") Aaron Hallam (Benicio Del Toro) carries out his military assignment to murder a high-ranking official. He receives a silver star for his valor, but he is scarred and haunted by the widespread images of genocide. Like Rambo, his adjustment to civilian life is difficult as he finds himself unable to turn off his instinctual killing machine. He ends up hunting the forest outside Portland, Oregon looking for and killing in cold blood anyone betraying the credo of PETA.

Continue reading: The Hunted Review

Mission To Mars Review


Terrible
Mission to Mars starts out with so much promise, it's hard to believe it could be anything but successful. The film has already taken a lot of flack for appearing to be a ripoff of 2001: A Space Odyssey, but maybe, I thought, it would transcend Kubrick's early sci-fi drama and put a new spin on things. Maybe blend it with a little Armageddon - you know, do the space movie right for once.

In 2020, the first manned mission to Mars is about to launch. Under the command of Luke Graham (Don Cheadle), the craft lands without a hitch, and within days they've made a startling discovery. A little radar probing turns up a strange metal just under the surface of Mars, and a mysterious disaster quickly wipes out the crew.

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Basic Review


Bad
Is that dramatic "woosh" the sound of the intense hurricane that complicates a doomed Army training mission in Basic? No, it's a byproduct of the ever-accelerating, freefalling careers of Johns Travolta and McTiernan.

Travolta's been in dire creative straits since The General's Daughter, and that's being generous. Ponder these big-budget turkeys: Battlefield Earth, Domestic Disturbance, Swordfish. And McTiernan is in no better position, returning with his first film since his Rollerball crap derby -- another waste of good celluloid in a long line that includes The Last Action Hero and The 13th Warrior.

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Basic Review


Weak

A Hollywood-slick military mystery-thriller packed with over-scripted, less than cogent twists, "Basic" is so full of cheap red herrings that watching it feels like gorging on a Long John Silver's all-you-can-eat buffet.

John Travolta stars as Tom Hardy, a cocky ex-Army Ranger turned possibly crooked DEA agent who is tapped by his former commander (Tim Daly) to interrogate survivors of a live-fire Special Forces training mission which went so badly awry that none of the survivors will talk about it with on-post investigators.

Of the nine soldiers that went into the Panama jungle during a hurricane under the command of hated, mercilessly hard-driving, order-barking Sgt. Nathan West (a perfectly cast Samuel L. Jackson), it seems only two came back alive. Everyone else, including the sergeant, was killed in either a friendly-fire accident or a heated showdown over command structure, West's psychological abuse and a possible drug-use cover-up.

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One Hour Photo Review


Good

In the flash-forward opening scene of "One Hour Photo," detectives come into an interrogation room and confront subtly unsettling Sy Parrish (Robin Williams) -- an obsessive mega-mart photo lab employee who gradually came to stalk a customer's family. They have questions about what he had against the family's father and a package of snapshots Sy took just before his arrest for crimes as yet unnamed. But he has only one thing to say about the pictures: "Do you guys have your own lab, or do you have to send it out?"

Following "Death to Smoochy" and "Insomnia," Williams puts the cherry on top of an image-tampering trifecta of psychotic antagonist roles with this unrecognizable performance. Balding and blonde, sporting Sans-a-Belt slacks, Velcro-fastened shoes, a blue smock and a freshly-straightened name tag, Sy blends into the perfectly ordered shelves of his bland, cavernous super-store. He seems harmless enough -- like a desperately lonely 45-year-old who has been socially inept and apprehensive his whole life -- until you see his apartment where he's literally lined the walls with hundreds of prints he's copied over several years from the photos of a pretty customer's seemingly ideal family. Then he seems as quietly menacing as Norman Bates.

In his imagination (some of which comes to life in a uncanny cut-and-paste sequence as the camera pushes in through the glossy finish of Sy's 4x6 prints), the photo clerk sees himself as "Uncle Sy" to this family that barely knows his name. In the course of the film, Sy's obsession, which begins with just making sure their pictures come out perfect, grows into something dangerous.

Continue reading: One Hour Photo Review

The Hunted Review


Bad

If I had only one sentence to explain how badly director William Friedkin has bungled "The Hunted," it would be this: 15-year-old Frankie Muniz, starring in this week's "Agent Cody Banks," is a more convincing covert operative as a kiddie spy than Benicio Del Toro is as the Special Forces assassin gone rogue in this movie.

In the unrelentingly violent Kosovo-war prologue -- which is supposed to establish why Del Toro went bonkers and can now be spotted filleting unsuspecting hunters like some vigilante vegan in the woods outside Portland, Oregon -- the star acts nothing like the stealthy, highly-trained, surgical-strike assassin he's supposed to be. In fact, he looks more like a clumsy little kid playing hide and seek (which is hardly suprising since he admits not training for the role).

It's almost laughable that he makes it all the way across an erupting urban battlefield and into a heavily guarded and fortified mosque to graphically slice-and-dice a cruel Serbian commander.

Continue reading: The Hunted Review

Demonlover Review


Bad

"Demonlover" features a score by art-punk band Sonic Youth that really captures the essence of the film: It's deliberately abrasive, rapidly pulsing electronic black noise that is designed to put the viewer on edge but ultimately signifies nothing.

A discombobulated, pretentious, psycho-sexual excursion into the cold-blooded, under-the-table fringe of 21st century corporate intrigue, it's a self-important drama in which poisoning, kidnapping, breaking and entering, ransacking, blackmail and brainwashing are all in a day's work -- and all add up to an unimaginative, exploitive shock ending.

The concoction of French filmmaker Olivier Assayas ("Irma Vep"), "Demonlover" stars Connie Nielsen ("Gladiator," "One Hour Photo") as Diane, a second-tier envoy for a Paris-based conglomerate that is negotiating a production and distribution deal with a Japanese maker of animated porn.

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Gladiator Review


OK

On the inevitable comparison scale of Roman epics, where "Spartacus" and "Ben-Hur" (both 1926 and 1959) are 10s and that debacle of a "Cleopatra" miniseries from last year is a zero, "Gladiator" is about a five. But it's a spectacularly handsome, relatively complex, and confidently directed five.

A stylish $100 million crowd-pleaser, it recreates the civilization of 180 A.D. in engrossing detail, from the huge, well-appointed sets to the CGI-rendered aerial shots of ancient Rome and the Colosseum -- which plays a pivotal role in the story.

But in addition to an assiduous production designer with carte blanche, every Roman epic needs an imposing, broad-shouldered hero. Therefore, enter Russell Crowe as a betrayed imperial general, sold into slavery as a gladiator, who fights his way back to Rome to avenge himself upon the devious new emperor that double-crossed him and murdered his family.

Continue reading: Gladiator Review

Connie Nielsen

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Connie Nielsen Movies

Justice League Trailer

Justice League Trailer

The planet is in turmoil. Superman is apparently dead and crime rates have surged around...

Wonder Woman Movie Review

Wonder Woman Movie Review

Boldly optimistic, this action-packed adventure breathes fresh life into the DC universe with a welcome...

Wonder Woman Trailer

Wonder Woman Trailer

Diana Prince is one of the Amazon warriors of Themyscira, a tribe of women with...

Justice League Teaser Trailer

Justice League Teaser Trailer

In the wake of his friend Clark Kent's monumental sacrifice, Bruce Wayne and Diana Prince...

Wonder Woman Trailer

Wonder Woman Trailer

Diana Prince is a goddess and princess of the Amazons. She lives her life surrounded...

Wonder Woman Trailer

Wonder Woman Trailer

Diana is a princess and one of the best fighters on the island she was...

The Runner Trailer

The Runner Trailer

Colin Pryce is a Louisiana congressman who becomes a hero in the eyes of all...

3 Days to Kill Movie Review

3 Days to Kill Movie Review

French filmmaker Luc Besson continues to combine family themes with intense violence (see Taken), but...

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

Joe is a fiercely determined 50-year-old woman whose sexual drive has taken over her entire...

Nymphomaniac: Volume 1 Trailer

Nymphomaniac: Volume 1 Trailer

Joe has always known she's been completely obsessed with sex ever since she was a...

3 Days To Kill Trailer

3 Days To Kill Trailer

Ethan Runner is a formidable Secret Service Agent ready to retire from his dangerous employment...

Perfect Sense Movie Review

Perfect Sense Movie Review

This high-concept apocalyptic thriller starts well, with a lush visual style and strong performances. But...

Battle In Seattle Movie Review

Battle In Seattle Movie Review

In Woody Allen's Bananas, a group of American soldiers are being airlifted to the mythical...

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