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Dustin Hoffman and Michael Nouri - Movies for Grownups Awards - Los Angeles, California, United Kingdom - Tuesday 12th February 2013

Dustin Hoffman and Michael Nouri
Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Hoffman

HBO's 'Luck' Runs Out Again As They're Sued For Horse Death Cover-up


Dustin Hoffman

The curious case of cancelled HBO drama Luck took another turn this week after it was reported by The Hollywood Reporter that Barbara Casey, who worked as the director of production in the American Humane Association’s film and television unit, has filed a lawsuit against her former employer and the HBO network.

Casey is accusing her employer AHA of conspiring with HBO to cover up the fact that several horses were dying on the set of the horse racing drama, which starred Dustin Hoffman. Casey is also accusing AHA of wrongful dismissal after they terminated her contract in January 2012. "AHA bowed to political and financial pressure and refused to report the Production Defendants' conduct to the authorities," she alleged in the suit. "AHA instructed Plaintiff not to report such conduct. AHA engaged in efforts to conceal and cover up the production defendants' criminal activities."

No reply from AHA has been forthcoming, but HBO said in a statement "We took every precaution to ensure that our horses were treated humanely and with the utmost care, exceeding every safeguard of all protocols and guidelines required of the production. Barbara Casey was not an employee of HBO, and any questions regarding her employment should be directed to the AHA."

Dustin Hoffman, David Letterman, Buddy Guy, Natalia Makarova And Led Zeppelin Honoured Kennedy Center


Dustin Hoffman David Letterman Buddy Guy Led Zeppelin

Made a significant contribution to American culture recently? Well unless you're in that headline, you've not done well enough. Dustin Hoffman, David Letterman, Buddy Guy, Natalia Makarova and Led Zeppelin have, and they've been recognized with a Kennedy centre honour because of it. Here are the winners:

Robert De Niro introduced actor and director Dustin Hoffman as a "world class, spectacular, colossal ... pain in the ass," before the 2000-strong audience were privy to a compilation of some of his best and most loved performances. "He just thinks at a different velocity," actor Liev Schreiber told reporters on the red carpet. "He burns at a brighter intensity," he added, according to Time.  

Natalia Makarova, renowned for her work as the lead in Giselle, became a star dancing with the Kirov Ballet in the 1950s and 1960s. She was awarded for her pure dedication and excellence in her field. Buddy Guy has won six Grammys for his work in rock as well as traditional and contemporary blues, and been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so it was about time the Kennedy Center gave him a call. 

Continue reading: Dustin Hoffman, David Letterman, Buddy Guy, Natalia Makarova And Led Zeppelin Honoured Kennedy Center

Dustin Hoffman, Lisa Hoffman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Hoffman Sunday 4th November 2012 AFI Fest - 'Quartet' - Premiere at the Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Dustin Hoffman, Lisa Hoffman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Dustin Hoffman, Lisa Hoffman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Dustin Hoffman, Lisa Hoffman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Dustin Hoffman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Dustin Hoffman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Dustin Hoffman, Lisa Hoffman and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Gottsegen - Dustin Hoffman, Lisa Gottsegen Monday 22nd October 2012 16th Annual Hollywood Film Awards Gala held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel

Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Gottsegen
Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Gottsegen

Dustin Hoffman Monday 22nd October 2012 16th Annual Hollywood Film Awards Gala held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel

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Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman

Dustin Hoffman Thursday 18th October 2012 Celebrities at the ITV studios

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Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Gottsegen
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Dustin Hoffman

Dustin Hoffman Wells Up Recalling Acting Past


Dustin Hoffman

Dustin Hoffman had to wipe away the tears as he spoke at a British Academy of Film & Television event last night (October 16, 2012). Hoffman was at an invite-only event at the HQ of BAFTA, and started recounting some of the harder tales from his 30 years in the business.

Talking about landing the role for 'Kramer Vs. Kramer' in 1980, Hoffman commented "I was getting divorced, I'd been partying with drugs and it depleted me in every way." His voice then began to crack as he explained that he didn't want to meet with the producer Stanley Jaffe and director and writer Bob Benton because he didn't like the script. "Your script has no feeling of what I'm going through," Hoffman said as he remembered the emotional turmoil of his breakup and divorce. He explained further that "for whatever reasons you just end up not being able to inhabit the same space," referencing the break-up from first wife Anne Byrne.

Hoffman also recalled how he was tempted to quit after being given bad reviews for 'The Graduate', though other stories took on a prouder stance, with the actor remembering the time he turned the at-the-time hot property Katie Jackson for relative unknown Meryl Streep in 'Kramer Vs. Kramer'. The talk covered most of the star's career, including recent films like 'Meet The Fockers'.


Dustin Hoffman, Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Dame Maggie Smith and Sheridan Smith - Dustin Hoffman, Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Dame Maggie Smith, Sheridan Smith Monday 15th October 2012 56th BFI London Film Festival: Quartet - American Airlines gala held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals.

Dustin Hoffman, Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Dame Maggie Smith and Sheridan Smith
Dustin Hoffman and Dame Maggie Smith
Dustin Hoffman and Dame Maggie Smith
Dustin Hoffman, Pauline Collins and Sheridan Smith
Dustin Hoffman, Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Dame Maggie Smith and Sheridan Smith
Dustin Hoffman and Dame Maggie Smith

Dustin Hoffman Monday 15th October 2012 56th BFI London Film Festival: Quartet - American Airlines gala held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals.

Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
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Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman

Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Maggie Smith, Tom Courtney, Sheridan Smith and Dustin Hoffman - Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Maggie Smith, Tom Courtney, Sheridan Smith and Dustin Hoffman Monday 15th October 2012 56th BFI London Film Festival - Quartet - Premiere Arrivals

Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Maggie Smith, Tom Courtney, Sheridan Smith and Dustin Hoffman
Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Maggie Smith and Tom Courtney
Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins and Tom Courtney
Billy Connolly and Pauline Collins
Billy Connolly
Sheridan Smith, Maggie Smith, Dustin Hoffman, Pauline Collins, Tom Courtney and Billy Connolly

Dustin Hoffman - Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Hoffman Saturday 15th September 2012 Dustin Hoffman enjoys a sunny day in Manhattan with his wife

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Dustin Hoffman Saturday 18th August 2012 Celebrities attend Dustin Hoffman's 75th birthday party at Taverna Tony restaurant in Beverly Hills

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Dustin Hoffman Wednesday 25th January 2012 HBO's 'Luck' Los Angeles premiere held at Graumans Chinese Theatre

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Dustin Hoffman and Michael Mann
Dustin Hoffman and Michael Mann
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Dustin Hoffman

Dustin Hoffman, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel Sunday 15th January 2012 The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards (Golden Globes 2012) held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals

Dustin Hoffman, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Dustin Hoffman - Monday 8th August 2011 at Scott's Restaurant London, England

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Dustin Hoffman Sunday 22nd May 2011 Los Angeles premiere of 'Kung Fu Panda 2' held at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Los Angeles, California

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Dustin Hoffman

Angelina Jolie, Dustin Hoffman and Jack Black - Angelina Jolie, Jack Black and Dustin Hoffman Cannes, France - 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 2 Thursday 12th May 2011

Angelina Jolie, Dustin Hoffman and Jack Black
Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie and Jack Black
Angelina Jolie
Dustin Hoffman and Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie

Dustin Hoffman Sunday 3rd April 2011 Dustin Hoffman and his wife, Lisa Gottsegen, shop at Barney's Of New York in Beverly Hills Beverly Hills, California

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Dustin Hoffman Monday 28th March 2011 Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Gottsegen out and about in Beverly Hills Beverly Hills, California

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Dustin Hoffman Sunday 20th February 2011 T-Mobile Magenta Carpet At The 2011 NBA All-Star Game held at L.A. Live! Los Angeles, California

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Dustin Hoffman

Barney's Version Review


Very Good
Based on the novel by Mordecai Richler, this film traces some 35 years in the life of its central character. More observational than plot-driven, its real strengths lie in performances that vividly draw out everyday emotions.

Barney Panofsky (Giamatti) has had an event-filled life that not many people quite understand. His first marriage to Clara (Lefevre) in 1970s Rome was short, but his second back home in Montreal (to Driver) was even briefer, as he met wife No 3, Miriam (Pike), at the reception. His later years are haunted by a detective (Addy) who's determined to prove that Barney killed his best friend (Speedman) back in the 80s. And then there's his feisty dad (Dustin Hoffman), smart kids (Jake Hoffman and Hopkins) and a too-friendly neighbour (Greenwood).

Continue reading: Barney's Version Review

Dustin Hoffman Monday 10th January 2011 leaves Katsuya after having lunch Los Angeles, California

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Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman

Dustin Hoffman - Saturday 25th December 2010 at Staples Center Los Angeles, California

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Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman

Little Fockers Review


Weak
While this second sequel to Meet the Parents features the same comedy of embarrassment and vulgarity as its predecessors, it also takes a strange sideways step into machismo that leaves it feeling rather joyless.

As their twins (Daisy Tahan and Colin Baiocchi) are about to turn 5, Greg and Pam Focker (Stiller and Polo) are planning a big birthday party involving both of their sets of parents. While Pam's intense dad Jack (De Niro) is pressuring Greg to be a family leader, her mom (Danner) tries to keep the peace.

Meanwhile, Greg's parents (Streisand and Hoffman) are on separate quests of their own. But it's Pam's ex Kevin (Wilson) who really stirs things up. As does a drug rep (Alba) who gets a bit too close to Greg.

Continue reading: Little Fockers Review

Barney's Version Trailer


Finding love has never really been a problem for Barney. Having been married once before, he thinks his marriage to 'the second Mrs P' is going to be it, he's finally ready to settle down. After all, you couldn't hope for more when you're marring a beautiful princess with 'a wonderful rack'; however when Barney lays eyes on Miriam, a guest at his wedding, he knows his marriage is a total sham and a huge mistake.

Continue: Barney's Version Trailer

Dustin Hoffman - Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Hoffman, Wednesday 15th December 2010 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

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Dustin Hoffman and Ed Sullivan - Monday 13th December 2010 at The Late Show With David Letterman New York City, USA

Dustin Hoffman and Ed Sullivan
Dustin Hoffman and Ed Sullivan
Dustin Hoffman and Ed Sullivan
Dustin Hoffman and Ed Sullivan
Dustin Hoffman and Ed Sullivan
Dustin Hoffman and Ed Sullivan

Dustin Hoffman Saturday 20th November 2010 Dustin Hoffman and Lisa Gottsegen out and about in Santa Monica Santa Monica, California

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Dustin Hoffman and AFI - Dustin Hoffman and wife Lisa Hoffman Hollywood, California - AFI Fest 2010 Centerpiece Gala Screening of Barney's Version held at the Egyptian Theatre Saturday 6th November 2010

Dustin Hoffman and Afi
Dustin Hoffman and Afi
Robert Lantos, Afi and Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman and Afi
Dustin Hoffman and Afi
Dustin Hoffman and Afi

Jesse Kovacs and Dustin Hoffman Thursday 26th August 2010 outside Katsuya restaurant in Hollywood Los Angeles, California

Jesse Kovacs and Dustin Hoffman
Jesse Kovacs and Dustin Hoffman

Last Chance Harvey Review


Weak
A film so mild-mannered it only occasionally registers a pulse, Joel Hopkins' Last Chance Harvey is best viewed as proof that not all filmed entertainment these days is nihilistic and grim. Occasionally there are still movies made about gentle, middle-aged people who have had a (mildly) hard time of things but still manage to find love in the gloaming of their years. The problem here being that mildness of heart does not translate into quality of art, or even entertainment.

The Hallmark-ready story begins with Harvey Shine (Dustin Hoffman), a borderline jerk of a guy who appears to have shut down on life by the time we find him. A jingle writer who once hoped for greater things musically, he's on his way to London where his daughter is marrying into a family that seems to have a greater affinity for his ex-wife's new husband than himself.

Continue reading: Last Chance Harvey Review

The Tale Of Despereaux Review


OK
The Tale of Despereaux began life as a children's book, and the animated film version does its best to reproduce the sounds of a storybook: The characters, especially the brave little titular mouse, are earnest rather than wisecracking, and Sigourney Weaver speaks in soothing, empathetic tones as the narrator, just like mom. The movie might have looked a bit more like a lush picture book, though, if it had been hand-drawn rather than computer-generated.

Computers are now the default tools of the animation world, of course, and animators have produced many stunning and even personal images using them. But the animation in Despereaux is hardly state-of-the-art, and so in exchange for that token modernity we get the same waxy, deformed humans a computer could've struggled with in the late nineties. The mammals fare a bit better, but the movie's limited charm comes from its old-fashioned, homespun quality, not CGI breeze rustling through tiny CGI mouse hairs.

Continue reading: The Tale Of Despereaux Review

Kramer Vs. Kramer Review


Excellent
Back in the late '70s, a wave of divorce swept across America, perhaps the first big mainstream reflection of the women's lib movement that had blossomed a few years earlier. All my friends' parents seemed to break up, and so did Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep in Kramer vs. Kramer, a zeitgeisty melodrama that fits right in with all the Upper East Side Woody Allen flicks of that era, only with lawyers instead of laughs. Showered with awards, including nine Oscar nominations and five wins, including Best Picture, it remains one of the most compelling films of the decade, even if time has tarnished a bit of its sheen.

Hard-driving and oblivious ad exec Ted Kramer (Hoffman, more jittery than usual) is blindsided when his alarmingly fragile wife Joanna suddenly abandons him and their six-year old son Billy (Justin Henry), claiming that she needs to go to California to, you know, "find herself." Clearly a woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she hands over the keys, the credit cards, and the dry-cleaning tickets and disappears, leaving Ted to answer Billy's question: "Where's Mommy?"

Continue reading: Kramer Vs. Kramer Review

Dustin Hoffman, Kung Fu Panda Interview


Dustin Hoffman -  Kung Fu Panda Interview

Hollywood superstar Dustin Hoffman talks about Kung Fu Panda, his character is a Panda who's a Kung Fu expert and he must teach Jack Blacks character Po, who's main interest in life is eating as many tasty treats as possible.

Continue reading: Dustin Hoffman, Kung Fu Panda Interview

Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium Review


Very Good
"Whimsy" is one of those things that's easier to write than to convincingly create. Several people are perfectly capable of scripting a scene where wide-eyed tots enter a room of perpetually bouncing balls, only to be chased out by a dodge ball the size of a Dodge truck. But precious few have the talent to bring said room to life for the good of a fantasy film.

Zach Helm, a gifted writer and director, unearths enough of those visual wizards for his debut picture Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium, a production designer's dream that is wondrously stuffed with the type of creativity usually reserved for children's literature. Helm proved he can write whimsically with his clever Stranger than Fiction script, where tax agent Will Ferrell ignored a narrators running commentary in his head. Now Helm's charming Emporium shows he's able to construct whimsy on screen, as well.

Continue reading: Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium Review

Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Review


Very Good
For all the talk of Stranger Than Fiction's clever Kaufmanisms, the most honest and sincere part of the film is about as clever as fireworks on the 4th of July. Harold Crick (Will Ferrell) sits at a small table in a local bakery and is coaxed into eating a freshly baked cookie with a glass of milk for dipping. There's a simplicity to the scene that speaks directly to the emotional core of the film, and speaks even more of Ferrell's talents as an actor.

Crick makes his money as an IRS auditor, which means his company is enjoyed on the same level as Beelzebub. Recently, Harold has been hearing his life being narrated to him by an omniscient female voice. This voice, amongst other things, has informed him that he will die and there's nothing he can do about it. In hopes of averting this certain fate, Crick befriends a literature professor (Dustin Hoffman, always welcome) and desperately tries to woo Ana Pascal (Maggie Gyllenhaal), the baker he is currently auditing. It ends up that the voice belongs to a writer named Karen Eiffel (a solid, suicidal Emma Thompson), who seems to have created Harold for her new book Death and Taxes.

Continue reading: Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Review

Hook Review


Weak
In Hook, Steven Spielberg's rather odd and flat update of Peter Pan, Robin Williams plays an adult Peter Pan as one Peter Banning, a big-money mergers and acquisitions attorney who drinks too much and misses his son's little league games because there's always that one last call on his cell. It's trying to be a modern and hip fantasy with the idea that Peter is a yuppie and has completely forgotten the magic and wonder of what we know to be his rather unique childhood.

But Captain Hook (Dustin Hoffman) hasn't forgotten. Since it's Peter's fault he has a hook instead of a hand, he wants revenge, so he kidnaps Peter's children. Tinkerbell (Julia Roberts) appears. She knocks Peter on the floor, ties him into a bed sheet, and then, in a lumpen image if there ever was one, flies him over the rooftops of London into Neverland where she drops him like a sack of coal (it is Christmas) so he can rescue his children from the evils of Hook, Smee, and the rest of the gaudily-costumed pirate crew.

Continue reading: Hook Review

Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Review


Very Good
For all the talk of Stranger Than Fiction's clever Kaufmanisms, the most honest and sincere part of the film is about as clever as fireworks on the 4th of July. Harold Crick (Will Ferrell) sits at a small table in a local bakery and is coaxed into eating a freshly baked cookie with a glass of milk for dipping. There's a simplicity to the scene that speaks directly to the emotional core of the film, and speaks even more of Ferrell's talents as an actor.

Crick makes his money as an IRS auditor, which means his company is enjoyed on the same level as Beelzebub. Recently, Harold has been hearing his life being narrated to him by an omniscient female voice. This voice, amongst other things, has informed him that he will die and there's nothing he can do about it. In hopes of averting this certain fate, Crick befriends a literature professor (Dustin Hoffman, always welcome) and desperately tries to woo Ana Pascal (Maggie Gyllenhaal), the baker he is currently auditing. It ends up that the voice belongs to a writer named Karen Eiffel (a solid, suicidal Emma Thompson), who seems to have created Harold for her new book Death and Taxes.

Continue reading: Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Review

Marathon Man Review


Extraordinary
"Is it safe?"

Brrrr... those words still chill me.

Continue reading: Marathon Man Review

Stranger Than Fiction Review


Very Good
For all the talk of Stranger Than Fiction's clever Kaufmanisms, the most honest and sincere part of the film is about as clever as fireworks on the 4th of July. Harold Crick (Will Ferrell) sits at a small table in a local bakery and is coaxed into eating a freshly baked cookie with a glass of milk for dipping. There's a simplicity to the scene that speaks directly to the emotional core of the film, and speaks even more of Ferrell's talents as an actor.Crick makes his money as an IRS auditor, which means his company is enjoyed on the same level as Beelzebub. Recently, Harold has been hearing his life being narrated to him by an omniscient female voice. This voice, amongst other things, has informed him that he will die and there's nothing he can do about it. In hopes of averting this certain fate, Crick befriends a literature professor (Dustin Hoffman, always welcome) and desperately tries to woo Ana Pascal (Maggie Gyllenhaal), the baker he is currently auditing. It ends up that the voice belongs to a writer named Karen Eiffel (a solid, suicidal Emma Thompson), who seems to have created Harold for her new book Death and Taxes.Stranger Than Fiction has a weighty proposal. We are asked to see the creation of a piece of art not from the writer's eyes, but rather from the evolving art's eyes itself. Talk about art imitating life. Is it healthier to be distanced from one's work to the point where killing him off is just work, or should one be so in love with the character that the author considers him real? Should a (seemingly) vacuous life be disposed of if it means something great will come with it? These are hefty themes about authorship and writing that writer Zach Helm actually tries to give a definitive answer to. Of course, these are questions that couldn't be answered by an HBO miniseries, let alone a movie that doesn't touch the 120-minute mark.Marc Forster, one of the more fascinating commercial directors to arrive in some time, works with some fresh tricks to make Helm's wildly ambitious script seem plausible. Surprisingly, Forster's technique with actors and his stylistic propensity for fluid camerawork create a bubbly atmosphere that is impossible to resist. The occasionally-overbearing ideas about death and writing can be distracting, but they are used to accentuate the heart of the film: the relationship between Ana and Harold.Gyllenhaal, coming off the melodramatic heft of World Trade Center, has the uncanny ability to shift the tone of her character from voltaic aggression to sublime delicacy without moving the film's own actual tone. She brings an electric current to nearly every scene she's in. Following Jim Carrey's recent transformation, Ferrell dumps the lovable moron shtick for a truly challenging role. Though the themes of Harold's plotline are familiar (live every day to its fullest), Ferrell brings out the joy in Crick with a subtlety that radiates warmth and fragile humor. The scenes between Gyllenhaal and Ferrell are remarkably sweet and ethereal without being overly sentimental. By using complex themes to enunciate the unlikely romance between Crick and Pascal, Forster has found a way to bring out all the quirks and nuances in this love letter wrapped in a Rubik's cube. It feels as natural as milk and cookies."Free Bird"? You got it.

Racing Stripes Review


Good
God bless Hollywood's family film genre. Where else could Malcolm in the Middle star Frankie Muniz receive top-billing over Oscar winners Dustin Hoffman and Whoopi Goldberg? And where else could squeaky-clean pop singer Mandy Moore share screen credits with gangster rap sensation Snoop Dogg?

These talents, of course, provide voices to an array of talking animals in the live action heartwarmer Racing Stripes, a sort of stripy Seabiscuit about an orphaned zebra with a horse's heart for racing. The misled mare, aptly nicknamed Stripes, wants desperately to compete with rival horses at the Kentucky Open - the Bluegrass State's natural landscapes contributing an exquisite backdrop to the film's conventional action. Along the way, the zebra is coached by a widowed father (Bruce Greenwood), his dedicated daughter (Hayden Panettiere), and a stable of talking animals including a Shetland pony (Hoffman), a goat (Goldberg), a rooster (Jeff Foxworthy), and two manure-craving flies named Buzz (Steve Harvey) and Scuzz (David Spade).

Continue reading: Racing Stripes Review

Outbreak Review


Good
You know this story by now: Dustin Hoffman and Rene Russo are medical researchers, sent to save a town infected with a virus brought in from an African monkey. Donald Sutherland is the bad guy: he wants to use the virus as a weapon. Morgan Freeman mediates, and Wolfgang Petersen directs.

The painfully obvious plotline makes this an overly long medical thriller with no thrill. All that's left is some spewed-out medical terms, a sappy love story, and a few million bucks worth of military surplus jeeps and tanks. Luckily, Dustin and Co. are able to put this stuff to fairly good work, with strong performances by Hoffman and Russo saving the day, and the eerie feeling that all this military goofiness is just a bit too real.

Continue reading: Outbreak Review

Lenny Review


Good
This awkward biopic traces the troubled life of notorious comic Lenny Bruce, as embodied by Dustin Hoffman in a good but still Hoffmanesque performance. Bruce's material is still offensive, out-there, and difficult, but its timeliness (heavy on the evils of racial stereotyping and epithets) is starting to fade. Segregation? The Kennedy assassination? We're talking old school.

Continue reading: Lenny Review

American Buffalo Review


Weak
Hardly Mamet's finest play-cum-film, American Buffalo has that Mamet cadence, but none of the soul. Revolving around the pathetic attempts of two penny-ante crook wannabes and their plans to rob a coin collector, the film is circular, pedantic, and in the end, without a point -- if the picture tells us anything, it's to eschew pawn shops.

I Heart Huckabees Review


Very Good
In David O. Russell's I Heart Huckabees, everyone talks a little bit like they're in a play -- the dialogue is unusually dense and abstract for a film, even an artsy one, even an "existential comedy," as this one purports to be. Huckabees is like a screwball comedy filtered through a student thesis project, but it's nothing if not original.

Five years have passed since Russell's crowning achievement so far, the Gulf War comedy-drama Three Kings, and the ensemble cast for his new film suggests he's spent a lot of that time collecting even more talent to act out his socio-comedic semi-political statements. Jason Schwartzman leads as Albert, a young environmental activist suffering a professional and personal meltdown, as his "coalition" is invaded by smarmy account executive Brad Stand (Jude Law) from the Wal-Mart-like chain store Huckabees (Albert wants to save a local marsh; Stand has his eye on good PR for his company). Albert hires the Jaffees, a pair of "existential detectives" (Lily Tomlin and Dustin Hoffman) to help solve the "case" of his messy life. Half private investigator and half new-age therapist, Tomlin commences the investigation by asking, "Have you ever transcended space and time?"

Continue reading: I Heart Huckabees Review

Runaway Jury Review


Extraordinary
It's a sunny weekday in beautiful New Orleans as a middle-aged, white-collar businessman arrives at his office. He settles into a chair behind his desk and ponders a song in his head. He can't think of the words, so he calls his secretary into the office. He explains to her that he will be celebrating his young daughter's birthday later today, and he promised to sing this song for her. The secretary smiles warmly and helps him remember the lyrics.

Suddenly, horror and chaos erupt as gunfire interrupts their singing. The businessman instructs the secretary to take shelter behind his desk as he locks the office door. After a moment, the gunfire stops, and he cautiously peeks outside the door -- only to be shot point blank in the head by the gunman, who then turns the weapon on himself.

Continue reading: Runaway Jury Review

Sphere Review


Weak
Sphere is one of those movies I hate to review more than I hate to watch. On one hand, you have the numerous good aspects of the film (top notch cast, etc.). On the other hand, you have a plot that can't be passed off in the world of celluloid.

Based on the novel by Michael Crichton, Sphere concerns a team called the ULF team (Unknown Life Form). These people, hand picked by Norman Johnson (Dustin Hoffman) during the cold war, are a team designed to make contact with alien life. On it are a mathmatician (Samuel L. Jackson), an astrophysicist (Liev Schrieber), a biologist (Sharon Stone), and a shrink who didn't take the whole thing seriously and picked people to be at each other's throats (Dustin Hoffman).

Continue reading: Sphere Review

Wag The Dog Review


Excellent
Another year-end flick with another four-star rating? What, am I nuts, or just some corporate tool shilling for would-be Oscar contenders?

Never mind that I am saving up all my real praise for Spice World next week... I'll try to lay it on again for Wag the Dog. It's a great little premise: what would happen if you tried to produce a phony war as a diversion away from a lecherous President's leisure time? A lot of wacky hijinks, from the looks of it! With everything from a "We Are the World" parody to a memorial for a P.O.W., Wag the Dog is really just a send-up of America's fascination with war from WWII through the Gulf War, where combat truly became a ridiculous exercise in soundbites and TV footage.

Continue reading: Wag The Dog Review

Meet The Fockers Review


OK
Will Teri Polo be remembered for any other movie aside from Meet the Parents and its sequel?

The answer is irrelevant and really doesn't matter at all. It's just something that struck me during one of the many lulls in the surprisingly uneven and marginally entertaining Meet the Fockers. Trust me: You'll have plenty of time to ponder this and other cinematic riddles when you're watching Fockers.

Continue reading: Meet The Fockers Review

The Messenger: The Story Of Joan Of Arc Review


OK
Milla J., stick to the singing career.

Luc Besson, imaginative mind behind such notable works of art such as The Professional, La Femme Nikita, and The Big Blue, has created such a memorable mess of things with his newest release, The Messenger. A car crash of a movie headed straight for the Days of Heaven territory.

Continue reading: The Messenger: The Story Of Joan Of Arc Review

Finding Neverland Review


Essential
The magic of Peter Pan is that it's never the same adventure twice. Of course, the story will always have a Tinkerbelle, a Captain Hook, and a few flying children. But what has made this beloved fairy tale endure for years cannot be found on the written page -- rather, it's firmly rooted in the creative imaginations of the innocent children who make the story come to life.

Finding Neverland is just as magical as the story that inspired it. Not only does it perfectly encapsulate James Barrie's crowning literary achievement, it reverberates in full vivid detail the extraordinary mind of this gifted playwright. This enchanting film, with its affecting sweetness delivered by a flawless cast, is destined to become a classic.

Continue reading: Finding Neverland Review

All The President's Men Review


Extraordinary
Classic collaboration of Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, and Richard Nixon, in the most scandalous political tale of our time -- Nixon's destruction after Watergate. (Sorry, Michael Moore!) The leads put human faces on the cold visages of Woodward and Bernstein, and more than any other movie about journalism, All the President's Men tells it like it is. (Well, was anyway -- check out Shattered Glass for a more up-to-date scenario.)

Moonlight Mile Review


OK
Warning: This review is tainted by the author's prejudices against Moonlight Mile director Brad Silberling. In 1998, Mr. Silberling took it upon himself to remake Wim Wenders' metaphysical masterpiece Wings of Desire as the anemic Meg Ryan vehicle City of Angels. The quality of Mr. Silberling's film did not compensate for the audacity of the idea, and this critic forever placed a mark of dishonor on the director. This is worth mentioning in light of the discussion of Moonlight Mile that is to follow.

With that said, Moonlight Mile is only half bad. Sure, it's weepy and sentimental and fails to take full advantage of an emotionally fertile premise. But as a story of loss, self-discovery and rebirth it succeeds as much as it fails. If this were baseball, Moonlight Mile would be batting .500, which is good. But this is the movies, so half bad means two and a half stars.

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Tootsie Review


Excellent
Dustin Hoffman has been nominated for seven Oscars and has won two for roles in Rain Man and Kramer vs. Kramer. With an inescapable nose and smallish stature, he's one of the few talents able to prove that the business of entertaining isn't always dependent on looks. He'll play boring or annoying roles every now and then, such as Captain Hook, but whatever he takes on, he does it with style.

Before Tootsie, Hoffman had been known more for his dramatic appearances in such films as All the President's Men and The Graduate. He hadn't been involved with all-out comedy yet, whether for lack of industry faith or blind luck. So Tootsie was his first venture into this more mainstream audience area, and he more than filled the part. Which brings us to one of the greatest role-reversal movies of the 1980's, for which Hoffman was nominated by the Academy again (though he didn't win).

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Hook Review


Weak
In Hook, Steven Spielberg's rather odd and flat update of Peter Pan, Robin Williams plays an adult Peter Pan as one Peter Banning, a big-money mergers and acquisitions attorney who drinks too much and misses his son's little league games because there's always that one last call on his cell. It's trying to be a modern and hip fantasy with the idea that Peter is a yuppie and has completely forgotten the magic and wonder of what we know to be his rather unique childhood.

But Captain Hook (Dustin Hoffman) hasn't forgotten. Since it's Peter's fault he has a hook instead of a hand, he wants revenge, so he kidnaps Peter's children. Tinkerbell (Julia Roberts) appears. She knocks Peter on the floor, ties him into a bed sheet, and then, in a lumpen image if there ever was one, flies him over the rooftops of London into Neverland where she drops him like a sack of coal (it is Christmas) so he can rescue his children from the evils of Hook, Smee, and the rest of the gaudily-costumed pirate crew.

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A Walk On The Moon Review


Weak
Six producers for this? Let me just say that there's nothing more stomach-turning than the idea of Viggo Mortensen getting naked for the camera, but boy does his ass play a huge role in this movie. Diane Lane, as a repressed suburbanite summering in the Catskills on the eve of the 1969 moon landing, gets naked plenty, too. But the moon landing is a horrible poor metaphor for infidelity and the hackneyed "sexual awakenings" themes laid out here. For die-hard fans only.

The Graduate Review


Essential
A rare, introspective masterpiece about a recent college grad (Dustin Hoffman) and his jaded outlook on life... which leads him into an ill-advised fling with the older, married Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft). A true classic and the spawn of the immortal one-word line of advice: "Plastics."

Hoffman is unforgettable, as is Bancroft (supposedly old enough to be Hoffman's mother but actually only 6 years his senior in real life). Of course, Buck Henry and Calder Willingham's adaptation of Charles Webb's novel is what makes this picture so perfectly solid ("Mrs. Robinson... you're trying to seduce me. Aren't you?"), and who can forget the masterful direction of Mike Nichols, here in his prime, setting up that immortal shot of Hoffman as seen beneath the bent knee of Bancroft? And Simon & Garfunkel's soundtrack is also perfectly apt, unforgettable to this day.

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Midnight Cowboy Review


Extraordinary
Joe Buck (Jon Voight), in what may be the boldest and most naive move in movie history, heads from west Texas to New York City via bus, to strike it rich as a male prostitute. He encounters a diminutive con man named Ratso (Dustin Hoffman), who takes him under his wing as his "manager." Sadly, it soon becomes apparent that neither of these characters can take care of themselves, much less one another. Depressing and nearly hopeless, this classic and infamous film (originally X-rated in 1969, it still won Best Picture), Midnight Cowboy has analogues in countless films from later years, all the way through American Beauty. Highly recommended.

Marathon Man Review


Extraordinary
"Is it safe?"

Brrrr... those words still chill me.

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Moonlight Mile Review


Good

Finding warmth, humor and uneasy comfort in the face of senseless tragedy, "Moonlight Mile" is a poignant movie about pain and loss that doesn't succumb to melodrama and cry-you-a-river, give-me-an-Oscar performances.

Described as "emotionally autobiographical" by writer-director Brad Silberling ("City of Angels") -- whose actress girlfriend was killed by a stalker in 1989 -- the film is about the apprehensive bond that forms between a young man and the parents of his fiancée, who is murdered in a diner just a few weeks before their wedding.

The story, which takes place in 1970s New England (gratuitous soundtrack warning), opens the morning of the funeral as fresh-from-college Joe Nast (Jake Gyllenhaal) wakes up in the childhood bedroom of his late bride-to-be and begins packing his suitcase. He's planned to leave that night, although he's not sure where he's going. But after the service, he spends the evening with her downhearted, acquiescent and ironic parents (Dustin Hoffman and Susan Sarandon), who have resolved simply to go on with life as planned -- just as soon as Sarandon, fed up with a day of public grieving, tosses into the fireplace all the silly self-help books ("These Things Happen," "Grieving for Grown-Ups") given to them by concerned friends trying awkwardly to help.

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Finding Neverland Review


Good

A colorful but melancholy whimsy burns at the heart of "Finding Neverland," and it is perfectly personified by Johnny Depp in another irreproachable, unconventional performance as playwright J.M. Barrie, creator of "Peter Pan."

In every scene, Depp gives the subtle but unmistakable impression of a man who, given his druthers, would chose to live in his imagination rather than in the real world. It's not that he's leading a miserable life -- although his theatrical career and his marriage have both hit a rough patch. It's just that the Barrie of this fantasy-tinged biopic has misplaced his sense of wonder until, battling writer's block during a day in the park, he meets the Sylvia Llewelyn Davies family, a pretty widow (Kate Winslet) and her four young sons who inspire his platonic adoration, his inner child and his legendary departure from stiff theatrical convention.

Although the story, adapted from a play by Allan Knee, feels indulgent and oversimplified at times -- especially when it comes to the many fanciful (and wonderfully staged) illustrations of Barrie's "Peter Pan" plot ideas that spring from playing with the Davies boys -- "Neverland" makes up for any shortcomings with intricate, intimate performances from its exceptional cast.

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Runaway Jury Review


OK

There are enough holes in the legal minutia of "Runaway Jury" to keep anyone with a law degree laughing from beginning to end. But for the rest of us, this fast-paced thriller's twist-crescendo-ing plot and sharp performances should at least delay the feeling of being duped until after the credits roll.

Another popcorny courtroom concoction from a John Grisham novel, the movie is a sensationalized peek into jury tampering during a big-money wrongful-death suit filed against an assault-weapon manufacturer after a workplace shooting.

The film wears its politics on its sleeve: the rich, cigar-smoking, unrepentant gun industry honchos have hired an unscrupulous jury consultant (deliciously iniquitous Gene Hackman) with the high-tech means to dig up dirt and create graphic-intensive computer-screen portfolios on everybody who received a jury summons for the case.

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The Messenger: The Story Of Joan Of Arc Review


OK

Joan of Arc, arguably history's most famous peasant girl, get a monster-budget makeover in "The Messenger," an appropriately over-produced, but not necessarily overwrought, grandiose epic biography from the indulgent mind of director Luc Besson.

From Besson's trademark lack of subtlety (which helped make "The Fifth Element" such a opulent and enjoyable exercise in sci-fi excess) to the babe-casting of "Element" hottie Milla Jovovich in the lead, "The Messenger" is a feast of lavish filmmaking that turns France's 15th Century virgin warrior into a pious, ardent action figure who would fit just as readily into a video game as she would into a confessional.

The movie hinges on Jovovich's performance as the evangelical 17-year-old girl who, without military experience and depending entirely on her conviction that she was an instrument of God, lead a vast army into bloody, ferocious battles that drove the occupying English out of large parts of France in order to seat her Dauphin (John Malkovich) on the throne as King Charles VII.

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Meet The Fockers Review


Unbearable

If the thought of seeing Robert DeNiro strapping on a homemade rubber breast to feed a coddled baby sounds side-splittingly hilarious to you, then "Meet the Fockers" may be worth running out to see in theaters.

But if you're more pained by the idea of watching a formerly great actor embarrass himself in an infantile, desperately uncreative sequel that will do anything for a cheap laugh, just imagine 2000's "Meet the Parents" remade with the comedy sensibilities of a 12-year-old. That way you won't have to sit through Ben Stiller's sixth nearly identical performance this year.

Seemingly tired of his own worn-out schtick, Stiller half-heartedly mugs for the camera in anxious, eyebrow-stitching baby faces as he nervously introduces his retired-hippie parents, Bernie and Roz Focker (Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand), to DeNiro's Jack Byrnes, the intimidating ex-CIA spook who is soon to be his father-in-law. But other than making Stiller's folks embarrassing polar opposites of stiff, serious straight-man DeNiro (Hoffman is full of hugs, Streisand teaches tantric sex to septuagenarians), "Fockers" just recycles plot points from its predecessor (DeNiro interrogates and spies on Stiller throughout) and culls obvious jokes from the uncomfortable circumstances.

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Dustin Hoffman

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Dustin Hoffman

Date of birth

8th September, 1937

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.67


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Dustin Hoffman Movies

The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) Movie Review

The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) Movie Review

Noah Baumbach (Frances Ha) is on his way to becoming the new Woody Allen, which...

The Meyerowitz Stories New And Selected Trailer

The Meyerowitz Stories New And Selected Trailer

Harold Meyerowitz (Dustin Hoffman) is a celebrated New York artist, whose quick-temper and filter-less conversation...

Kung Fu Panda 3 Movie Review

Kung Fu Panda 3 Movie Review

This animated trilogy concludes on a very high note with this smart, involving and often...

Kung Fu Panda 3 Trailer

Kung Fu Panda 3 Trailer

Po and The Furious Five return in Kung Fu Panda 3! Po might now be...

The Program Movie Review

The Program Movie Review

A whooshing pace and snappy dialogue help bring this true story to life, tracing the...

The Program Trailer

The Program Trailer

Lance Armstrong was an athlete the entire world loved to support. Having beaten testicular cancer...

The Choir Trailer

The Choir Trailer

Stet is just 11-years-old and struggling to come to terms with his mother's death. He...

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Kung-Fu Panda 3 - Teaser Trailer

Kung-Fu Panda 3 - Teaser Trailer

Po the giant panda may be ever increasing his prowess at kung-fu, but he still...

The Program - First Look Trailer

The Program - First Look Trailer

Lance Armstrong is a cycling legend, with seven Tour De France wins under his belt...

The Cobbler Trailer

The Cobbler Trailer

Some people are far more important than you might think. For one lowly cobbler, things...

Chef Movie Review

Chef Movie Review

Like comfort food, this movie has very little nutritional value, but it sure goes down...

Chef Trailer

Chef Trailer

Carl Casper is a chef working at one of the top restaurants of Miami. Food...

Chef Trailer

Chef Trailer

Carl Casper is a well-known chef from Miami who works in a trendy LA restaurant...

Kung Fu Panda 2 Movie Review

Kung Fu Panda 2 Movie Review

Jack Black's cuddly alter-ego is back for another epic adventure in this lively, colourful sequel....

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