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Dwight Yoakam

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Dwight Yoakam - Dwight Yoakam performing live at Restaurang Tradgar'n in Sweden - Gothenburg, Sweden - Monday 28th July 2014

Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam

Dwight Yoakam and Guest - The 55th Annual Grammy Awards - Warner Music Group 2013 Grammy Celebration Presented By Mini Los Angeles California United States Monday 11th February 2013

Dwight Yoakam and Guest
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam and Guest

Dwight Yoakam Tuesday 8th December 2009 arrives for the LA premier of Crazy Heart California, USA

Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam

Helen Mirren and Dwight Yoakam - Helen Mirren & Dwight Yoakam Los Angeles, California - Los Angeles Premiere of 'Couples Retreat' held at Mann's Village Theatre in Westwood - Arrivals Monday 5th October 2009

Helen Mirren and Dwight Yoakam
Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren

Dwight Yoakam Monday 8th December 2008 The Los Angeles Premiere of 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' held at the Mann's Village Theatre. - Arrivals Los Angeles, Califorina

Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam

Dwight Yoakam Sunday 8th June 2008 2008 CMA Music Festival Day 4 - The Night Concerts at LP Field Nashville, Tennessee

Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam

Dwight Yoakam - Saturday 2nd February 2008 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Los Angeles, California

Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam

Dwight Yoakam Monday 28th January 2008 Los Angeles premiere of 'Wild West Comedy Show: 30 Days & 30 Nights - Hollywood to the Heartland' held at the Egyptian Theatre - Arrivals Hollywood, California

Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam
Dwight Yoakam

Dwight Yoakam Monday 28th January 2008 Los Angeles premiere of 'Wild West Comedy Show: 30 Days & 30 Nights - Hollywood to the Heartland' held at the Egyptian Theatre - Arrivals Hollywood, California

Dwight Yoakam

Panic Room Review


Excellent
It's Home Alone for grown-ups. And just like kids ate up Macaulay Culkin and his homebound adventure, Panic Room is a real (yet creepy) crowd-pleaser for adults.

David Fincher directs this long-awaited follow-up to his groundbreaking Fight Club, with Jodie Foster in her first lead role since 1999's Anna and the King. The story is deceptively simple: Imminent divorcee Meg (Foster) is gaining a boatload of a settlement and, with her bratty, diabetic daughter Sarah (newcomer Kristen Stewart), decides to buy a cavernous, four-story brownstone in Manhattan's upper west side. The night they move in, three burglars pay a visit, searching for an alleged $3 million hidden somewhere in the house. Meg and Sarah hightail it to the secret "panic room," an impenetrable safe room off the master bedroom - only to learn that the money is secreted inside the panic room as well. A game of cat and mouse ensues - only the mice are definitively trapped in one tiny room.

Continue reading: Panic Room Review

Crank Review


Very Good
They call it the "Beijing cocktail" and when it's injected into your bloodstream you've got about an hour to live. The science behind the drug is cloudy. But all you need to know is that it slows your heart to a crawl. A deadly crawl. The only solution is adrenalin. Lots and lots of adrenalin. When contract killer Chev Chelios (Jason Statham) is pumped full of "Beijing cocktail" he catches on quick that to survive - see his girl, kill the man who doped him, even some scores - he's got to keep moving. Keep pumped. This means we're treated to roughly 90 minutes of Statham ingesting, swilling, snorting or injecting every drug, energy drink and caffeine powder he can find. Exactly 85 minutes of Statham racing through downtown L.A., bowling over pedestrians, shooting mobsters, brawling with gang bangers and having sex in public. Eighty-five minutes of Statham doing anything and everything possible to keep his heart beating as rapidly as it can. Crank is trashy, vulgar, violent, and every bit as excessive as you'd imagine. I loved every delirious minute of it.

The best parts of the film are those you don't expect. We know that Statham, being a hit man (and British at that), will go after the men who wronged him. We know he'll get into all manner of complications along the way. That's Action Film 101. Where Crank excels is in its inventiveness. Like Pulp Fiction before it (or the recent, underrated Running Scared) the thrill is in the unexpected turns. And the plot of Crank is geared for constant invention. Stratham needs to stay mobile, needs to stay pumped, so the film never passes up an opportunity to shove some action his way. When Statham begins to flag (the sound flutters, the picture dims) and he needs an adrenaline fix, the audience is cued for another round. It's almost William Castle-like in its fun gimmickry.

Continue reading: Crank Review

Red Rock West Review


Excellent
With J.T. Walsh, Dennis Hopper, and Lara Flynn Boyle in your desert thriller, it's hard to go wrong, and in his riveting sophomore feature, John Dahl rarely gets tripped up. Why, even Nicolas Cage is in fine form, filling this small movie with wit and a surprising toughness that is refreshing in a world of pulled punches and pointless violence. Tragically, Dahl's output has slowly meandered into irrelevant Hollywood fluff, but you can remember some of his great, early work with this film. It gets a little self-consciously twisty in the last act, but it's all good. This trip through the Wyoming desert (though none of it was shot there) is one you won't soon forget.

The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review


Extraordinary
Tommy Lee Jones made his big-screen acting debut in the 1970 classic Love Story, yet it took him over 20 years and impressive performances in movies like JFK and The Fugitive to become a household name. Acclaim for Jones as a director should come much faster, if his debut film, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, is a sign of things to come. Burials is a complex and remarkably assured film, taking the audience on a literal and metaphoric journey through the sand-blasted wastelands of south Texas to a point of redemption and agony, of forgiveness and searing regret.

Written by Guillermo Arriaga (Amores Perros, 21 Grams), the story is broken into several parts, each introduced by a chapter heading, jumping forward and backward in time. The action begins with two hunters coming upon the disinterred body of an illegal Mexican immigrant, Melquiades Estrada, who has been shot to death and hastily buried in a makeshift grave, only to have a coyote dig him up. The redneck sheriff (Dwight Yoakam) doesn't care enough about a dead Mexican to investigate his death, even though Melquiades' friend and employer, Pete Perkins (Jones), gives him evidence implicating a border patrolman.

Continue reading: The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review

The Newton Boys Review


Very Good
Soon after we walked into the theater on opening night of The Newton Boys, I feared we had made a mistake. It seemed that the Leonardo's fan club had gotten lost, and instead of marching like lemmings into another screening of Titanic, these pre-ten girls had packed themselves into our cozy theater. The cries of "Oh baby" as soon as Matthew McConaughey appeared on screen, however, made me realize that they were simply looking for another cute young guy (or four) to gawk at.

The four young guys that our lovable preteens came to gawk at are McConaughey, Ethan Hawke, Skeet Ulrich, and Vincent D'Onofrio as Willis, Jess, Joe, and Dock Newton respectively. The Newton boys are you're stereotypical cowboys turned bank robbers who have decided that a home on the range isn't enough for them.

Continue reading: The Newton Boys Review

The Minus Man Review


Bad
I'm still trying to figure out how to look at The Minus Man. Either it's supposed to be a dark, black comedy, or it's supposed to be a thoughtful, pensive drama/thriller a la Sling Blade.

Either way, it's a dismal failure.

Continue reading: The Minus Man Review

Hollywood Homicide Review


Weak
Ron Shelton fans (you know who you are) will be happy to hear that Hollywood Homicide improves on Dark Blue, the director's failed LAPD endeavor from earlier this year. But that's like saying white paint tastes a little better than purple paint. For the sake of your health, neither should be ingested.

As part of its tired buddy-cop routine, Homicide suggests that everyone in La La Land works one career but dreams of another. Cops want to be real estate brokers, musicians want to be actors. So it's only appropriate that the film plays along with this concept, laboring as a police investigation by day and moonlighting as an entertainment industry spoof after hours.

Continue reading: Hollywood Homicide Review

Waking Up In Reno Review


Terrible
There are bad movies, and there are awful movies. And then there is Waking Up in Reno, one of the worst films ever made, so bad it had to be delayed theatrically at least a couple of times before finally grossing about $260,000 in theaters.

Swept Away more than doubled that.

Continue reading: Waking Up In Reno Review

Don't Look Back Review


Good
Yet another Eric Stoltz drug junkie thriller, only this time it's split between L.A. and Galveston, Texas. Body count = ~11. Oddly, this film has no known producer.

Panic Room Review


Excellent
It's Home Alone for grown-ups. And just like kids ate up Macaulay Culkin and his homebound adventure, Panic Room is a real (yet creepy) crowd-pleaser for adults.

David Fincher directs this long-awaited follow-up to his groundbreaking Fight Club, with Jodie Foster in her first lead role since 1999's Anna and the King. The story is deceptively simple: Imminent divorcee Meg (Foster) is gaining a boatload of a settlement and, with her bratty, diabetic daughter Sarah (newcomer Kristen Stewart), decides to buy a cavernous, four-story brownstone in Manhattan's upper west side. The night they move in, three burglars pay a visit, searching for an alleged $3 million hidden somewhere in the house. Meg and Sarah hightail it to the secret "panic room," an impenetrable safe room off the master bedroom - only to learn that the money is secreted inside the panic room as well. A game of cat and mouse ensues - only the mice are definitively trapped in one tiny room.

Continue reading: Panic Room Review

The Minus Man Review


Good

Early on in "The Minus Man" you're not quite sure what you're seeing. There's a drifter named Vann (Owen Wilson) who lands in a small town. He's a polite, upright joe, but there's something not right about him that's hard to pin down.

He moves into with a tormented couple (Mercedes Ruehl and Brian Cox), who rent him the untouched room that once belonged to their missing (or is she dead?) daughter. He gets a job at the Post Office and is quickly promoted from sorter to carrier based on little more than his queer congeniality. He clumsily romances another postal employee (Janeane Garofalo in the cynicism-free role of an insecure romantic doormat), and just as the movie starts to look like a slice of life/ensemble of oddballs flick, townspeople start disappearing.

No one suspects Vann, of course. At first, not even the audience realizes they should. But Vann, you see, is a serial killer.

Continue reading: The Minus Man Review

Hollywood Homicide Review


Good

"Hollywood Homicide" is a sly satire of buddy-cop action-comedies that replicates the genre's trappings so precisely many moviegoers will mistake it for a genuinely bad buddy-cop action-comedy.

The vaguely ridiculous title and overtly assembly-line plot all by themselves had me dreading the press screening. A handsome, aging, grumpy detective (Harrison Ford) in a wise-cracking reluctant partnership with a handsome rookie detective (Josh Hartnett), both of whom are way out of their depths investigating the gunning down of a rap group in a hip-hop club? Talk about knee-deep in Hollywood pig slop.

But writer-director Ron Shelton ("Tin Cup," "Bull Durham") -- who wrote this film just after completing his for-hire helming of the genuinely cliché-riddled L.A. cop drama "Dark Blue" -- embraces this ostensible triteness and reshapes it into comedy of the absurd without being conspicuously ironic or self-aware. "Hollywood Homicide" is often authentically slapdash, shallow and hackneyed because its mockery of Hollywood's pre-fabricated blockbuster mentality is meant to sneak up on you.

Continue reading: Hollywood Homicide Review

Dwight Yoakam

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Dwight Yoakam

Date of birth

23rd October, 1956

Occupation

Musician

Sex

Male

Height

1.83






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Dwight Yoakam Movies

Logan Lucky Movie Review

Logan Lucky Movie Review

Good news: Steven Soderbergh's well-publicised retirement from directing only lasted about four years. He's back...

Logan Lucky Trailer

Logan Lucky Trailer

Jimmy and Clyde Logan are two down-and-out brothers from West Virginia. Jimmy has been fired...

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90 Minutes In Heaven Trailer

90 Minutes In Heaven Trailer

Don Piper is a baptist minister who has everything to live for; a wonderful wife...

Bloodworth Trailer

Bloodworth Trailer

After E.F. Bloodworth abandoned his wife and family to take up a life on the...

Crank 2: High Voltage Trailer

Crank 2: High Voltage Trailer

Watch the trailer for Crank 2: High Voltage.Jason Statham picks up his role as Chev...

Crank Movie Review

Crank Movie Review

They call it the "Beijing cocktail" and when it's injected into your bloodstream you've got...

Bandidas Movie Review

Bandidas Movie Review

In the history of really silly wigs, Dwight Yoakam's long, crimped black hair in Bandidas...

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