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Michael Buble Was Told His Music Wouldn't Sell


Michael Buble David Foster Whitney Houston Celine Dion Frank Sinatra

Michael Buble was told his music wouldn't sell.

The 'Haven't Met You Yet' hitmaker has revealed that David Foster, who has worked with the likes of Whitney Houston and Celine Dion, told him he would be happy to produce a record for him if he was to pay $100,000 a track.

He said: ''[David told me,] 'You will never be signed to my label, I will never produce you. You are talented but I see no record sales for this genre of music. To dismiss me, [Foster] said, 'For $100,000 a track, I will produce on spec a record for you, and because I'm an executive of Warner Bros they'll get first right of refusal. And then he pushed me out the door thinking he would never see me again.

Continue reading: Michael Buble Was Told His Music Wouldn't Sell

Chris Martin Compares Rihanna's Voice To A Tube Of Toothpaste (In A Good Way)


Coldplay Rihanna Chris Martin Frank Sinatra

Coldplay frontman Chris Martin has found a unique why to describe Rihanna’s voice, by comparing it to a ‘beautifully squeezed tube of toothpaste.’ Speaking to The Guardian, Martin praised the Barbadian singer’s rich vocals, saying she can turn ‘anything into gold’.

Chris MartinChris Martin thinks Rihanna’s voice is like a beautifully squeezed tube of toothpaste.

“She is the Frank Sinatra of our generation. She can turn anything into gold with that voice. Here’s the thing: if you speak to a good singing teacher about great opera singers, they will talk about consistency of tone."

Continue reading: Chris Martin Compares Rihanna's Voice To A Tube Of Toothpaste (In A Good Way)

Frank Sinatra Jr. - Jazz Roots: Frank Sinatra Jr. Sings Sinatra, a Multimedia Centennial Celebration at the Knight Concert Hall within the Adrienne Arsht Center at Adrienne Arsht Center Knight Hall - Miami, Florida, United States - Friday 11th March 2016

Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots

Frank Sinatra Jr. - Jazz Roots: Frank Sinatra Jr. Sings Sinatra, a Multimedia Centennial Celebration at the Knight Concert Hall within the Adrienne Arsht Center at Adrienne Arsht Center Knight Hall - Miami, Florida, United States - Friday 11th March 2016

Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots
Frank Sinatra and Roots

Nancy Reagan, Nancy Davis , Frank Sinatra - NB: Salute to the President Dinner, Beverly Hills, CA, November 12 - - Tuesday 5th May 2015

Nancy Reagan, Nancy Davis and Frank Sinatra

Frank Sinatra JR. - Frank Sinatra, Jr. performing live at Bergen Performing Arts Center in Englewood at Bergen Performing Arts Center - Englewood, New Jersey, United States - Friday 13th November 2015

Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra

Kristen Rae Myers - Frank Sinatra's 100th birthday celebration held at Avalon at avalon - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 10th May 2015

Frank Sinatra and Kristen Rae Myers
Frank Sinatra and Kristen Rae Myers
Frank Sinatra and Kristen Rae Myers
Frank Sinatra and Kristen Rae Myers
Frank Sinatra and Kristen Rae Myers
Frank Sinatra and Kristen Rae Myers

So Robbie Williams Has The 1000th UK No.1 Album, But Who Did It First?


Robbie Williams Frank Sinatra Jake Bugg Lady GaGa

While one charismatic, sweet-talking solo singer has marked a landmark for British music by recording the country’s 1000th number one, the man who make the mould for such a singer kicked the whole thing off with the UK’s very first.

Robbie Williams Swings Both WaysRobbie Williams Is No.1 On The Albums Chart

Robbie Williams’ big band album Swings Both Ways topped the charts, coincidentally becoming the UK’s 1000th number one album, but it was the king of charm, Frank Sinatra, who had the first number one, with Songs For Swingin' Lovers, in 1956. The connection between the first and the last make for a palpable sense of symmetry between the pair.

Continue reading: So Robbie Williams Has The 1000th UK No.1 Album, But Who Did It First?

Forget Sinatra, Ronan Farrow Is The Brains Of The Family


Mia Farrow Ronan Farrow Woody Allen Frank Sinatra

Ronan Farrow may well be Woody Allen's biological son, then again, he could be Frank Sinatra's. In a Vanity Fair interview that probably didn't do Ronan any favors this week, his mother Mia Farrow made the case for old blue eyes being the daddy.

Ronan hasn't seen Woody for years and his likeness to Sinatra is striking, however, it's not wise to use the 25-year-old as the subject of gossip, speculation and celebrity tittle-tattle. This guy is arguably the smartest guy in the family - whether that includes Woody, or Frank - and he's got a big future.

Ronan has been a determined human rights activist since graduating from Bard College at the ripe old age of 15. "I grew up with altruism on display in a pretty intense way," he told Forbes, referring to his 10 adopted siblings, some of whom suffer from severe disability. 

Continue reading: Forget Sinatra, Ronan Farrow Is The Brains Of The Family

In Light Of Courtney Love Covering Jay Z's '99 Problems': Five Most Unlikely Cover Versions


Courtney Love Jay Z Rolf Harris Led Zeppelin Manic Street Preachers Rihanna Leona Lewis Nine Inch Nails Sid Vicious Frank Sinatra Take That Nirvana

Courtney Love doesn’t have much of a track record when it comes to cover versions. With her band Hole, she would often play a version of Guns N Roses’ ‘Paradise City’ that she would abandon half way through. Same goes for Depeche Mode’s ‘Hungry Like A Wolf,’ though the band did release a brilliant cover of Velvet Underground’s ‘Pale Blue Eyes,’ it has to be said.

When we heard that Courtney Love covered Jay Z’s ’99 Problems,’ though, we feared for the worst. And, sadly, our fears were confirmed. “This either sucks or it’s genius, I don’t know,” she said as she introduced the song at her impromptu Sundance Film Festival set.

Continue reading: In Light Of Courtney Love Covering Jay Z's '99 Problems': Five Most Unlikely Cover Versions

The Grammy Hall Of Fame List For 2013 Marks Its 40th Year


Whitney Houston James Brown Bob Dylan Buck Owens Richard Pryor Little Richard Billy Joel Sir Paul McCartney AC DC Frank Sinatra

Since 1973, the Grammys have been inducting particular recordings that have stood the test of time into their hall of fame. The list doesn't only include music and one of the most famous hall of famers in there is Martin Luther King Jr.'s 'I Have A Dream' speech. The institution have just released a few of the artists and tracks that will be included in the hall of fame for 2013 on their home website.

Included in the list are James Brown, Bob Dylan, Carlos Gardel, Buck Owens, Richard Pryor, Little Richard, Paul McCartney & The Wings, and Billy Joel. Neil Portnow, the President and CEO of the Recording Academy spoke of next year's importance. "With the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame celebrating 40 years, it's especially important to note that these entries continue the tradition of inducting a wide variety of recordings that have inspired and influenced both fans and music makers for generations," he said. "Memorable for being both culturally and historically significant, we are proud to add them to our growing catalog of outstanding recordings that have become part of our musical, social, and cultural history."

There are a couple of tracks in this years list of 27 entrants that are surprising, if only that it's take 40 years for them to make the cut. Frank Sinatra's 'New York, New York' will be in the hall of fame as of next year, though surely its iconographic status had already more proven its worth. AC/DC's 'Back in Black' also appears in the list. Perhaps to pay tribute to a great figure in music, Whitney Houston's self titled album will also be inducted, marking the further great achievements and talents from all over the world, and rounding off a great 40 years of the Grammy hall of fame. 

Adele- Bittersweet Success In Funeral Charts


Adele Frank Sinatra Monty Python Robbie Williams Eva Cassidy

Adele's instant modern classic 'Someone Like You' immediately struck a chord for those mourning a relationship, so it's no real surprise that this solemn ballad has made it to number 22 in the Co-Operative Funeralcare's chart for funeral songs- a list of the most requested songs at funerals over the past 12 months.

Adele's appearance in the list continues a growing tradition of pop music overtaking the place of hymns at funerals, so found the survey of 250 of the 900 funeral homes run by the Co-Operative. In fact, Gigwise reports that “They found that pop music has replaced hymns in two-thirds of British funerals as hymns have fallen to 30% of funeral music requests.” For the past seven years Frank Sinatra's 'My Way' has topped the list, and is requested at 15% of all funerals. Plus more ironic songs such as Monty Python's 'Always Look on the Bright Side of Life' often makes an appearance.

The Top 10 pop songs requested at funerals in 2012 include Eva Cassidy's 'Over the Rainbow', Nat King Cole 'Unforgettable' and Robbie Williams' 'Angels' among others.

Continue reading: Adele- Bittersweet Success In Funeral Charts

Bittersweet Success For Adele In Funeral Charts


Adele Frank Sinatra Robbie Williams Eva Cassidy Nat King Cole

Adele's instant modern classic 'Someone Like You' immediately struck a chord for those mourning a relationship, so it's no real surprise that this solemn ballad has made it to number 22 in the Co-Operative Funeralcare's chart for funereal songs - a list of the most requested songs at funerals over the past 12 months.

Adele's appearance on the list continues a growing tradition of pop music overtaking the place of hymns at funerals, so found the survey of 250 of the 900 funeral homes run by the Co-Operative. In fact, Gigwise reports that “They found that pop music has replaced hymns in two-thirds of British funerals as hymns have fallen to 30% of funeral music requests.” For the past seven years Frank Sinatra's 'My Way' has topped the list, and is requested at 15% of all funerals. Plus more ironic songs such as Monty Python's 'Always Look on the Bright Side of Life' often makes an appearance.

The Top 10 pop songs requested at funerals in 2012 include Eva Cassidy's 'Over the Rainbow', Nat King Cole 'Unforgettable' and Robbie William's 'Angels' among others.Only 4% of funerals now have classic music requested and hymns account for only 30% of songs at funerals. The popularity of Adele's song may be in the million records that it sold in 2011 and her heart wrenching rendition that she performed at the Brit Awards in the same year, where she was overwhelmed by tears by the end of her performance.


Andy Williams Dies: Tributes To The Star Led By Tony Christie


Andy Williams Tony Christie Frank Sinatra Tony Bennett Don Black Tim Burgess Charlatans Zoe Ball

Tributes to Andy Williams have been led today by fellow crooner Tony Christie. Andy Williams has died, aged 84, following a year-long battle against bladder cancer. He was best known for his rendition of the song ‘Moon River’ but had many other hits, including ‘Raindrops Are Falling on My Head’ and ‘Music To Watch Girls By.’ Tony Christie told BBC News that Williams was “up there with Sinatra, Bennett,” referring to Frank Sinatra and Tony Bennett. “I enjoyed a chat with him backstage at the Royal Albert Hall some years ago,” Christie added, “and he was a lovely man, very gentle…he was a pleasure to have met.”

Williams’ influence spread far and wide; many of the songs that he recorded and performed have become staples in the musical upbringings of several generations. The composer Don Black, who wrote ‘Born Free’ (another classic Williams track) said that he was the “ultimate professional… He was a great guy, he was very professional but didn't take himself too seriously. That type of performer doesn't exist anymore. It's gradually becoming the end of an era.”

It’s not just Williams’ contemporaries that have been paying tribute to the late singer though; Tim Burgess, the singer of The Charlatans, said “Andy Williams was a real smooth guy, that's for sure. Rest in peace, Andy.” The Radio One DJ Zoe Ball also posted a touching message on her Twitter page, to say “what a chap. May his star always shine bright.”


Frank Sinatra Jr and Frank Sinatra Tuesday 3rd November 2009 Signs copies of the new 'Sinatra: New York' Box Set at J&R Music World. New York City, USA

Frank Sinatra Jr and Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra Jr and Frank Sinatra

Frank Sinatra, Jamie Foxx, Leonardo Dicaprio, Martin Scorsese and Ray Charles Friday 19th September 2008

Frank Sinatra, Jamie Foxx, Leonardo Dicaprio, Martin Scorsese and Ray Charles

Tina Sinatra and Frank Sinatra Tuesday 13th May 2008 Unveiling of the Frank Sinatra stamp in front of The Bellagio fountains Las Vegas, Nevada

Tina Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
Tina Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
Tina Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
Tina Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
Tina Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
Tina Sinatra and Frank Sinatra

A.J. Lambert and Frank Sinatra - A.J. Lambert, Christian Hoff and Nancy Sinatra New York City, USA - 42-cent Frank Sinatra commemorative stamp dedication ceremony held at Gotham Hall Tuesday 13th May 2008

A.j. Lambert and Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
A.j. Lambert, Frank Sinatra and Nancy Sinatra
Frank Sinatra Jr. and Frank Sinatra
Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra

On The Town Review


Excellent
In the 1949 musical On the Town, you'll find a lot of things that might seem familiar from other musicals - big set pieces and a whimsical, can-do attitude - but at least one or two that will seem completely foreign. Top of the list: Frank Sinatra himself playing a detail-oriented nerd of a guy more interested in seeing the sights than he is scoring with a big-city dame. Also up there: the women in the film are much brassier than just about any actresses you'd see on screen these days, but more on that later.

Starting with the beyond-iconic framing number "New York, New York," which blasts out with unalloyed gusto just as the film's three sailors come tumbling off their boat with a mere 24 hours' shore leave to take in all the sights and sounds of New York, the film is an unapologetically muscular toe-tapper of a show. This is most clearly due to Adolph Green and Betty Comden's script and songs that come piling out in quick succession, practically elbowing each other out of the way with the help of Leonard Bernstein's score. The intended effect is to convey the feel of a bustling American city during all its phases (from the quiet, just waking-up opener "I Feel Like I'm Not Out of Bed Yet" to the nightlife epic "On the Town"), and it's nearly perfectly conveyed.

Continue reading: On The Town Review

Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra Monday 19th March 2007 at Emmy Awards

Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra

Suddenly Review


Very Good
An interesting, almost experimental little film for 1954. Clocking in at 75 brisk minutes, it's also quite prescient: A man (Frank Sinatra) holes up in a suburban home, taking the family living there hostage for an hour or so. Why? He's going to assassinate the president, whose train will be pulling up at 5 o'clock, right across the street. Sinatra shelved the film after his friend JFK was assassinated many years later. It's now resurfaced to be experienced anew. It's not great filmmaking, but the way a major assassination like this is almost shruggingly planned and executed is quite interesting. The same film made today would involve three car chases, helicopters, and the house blowing up. Suddenly portrays a killing as something that you almost don't bother thinking about before it's done. Fascinating.

Some Came Running Review


OK
You can dress Frank Sinatra up as a mysterious ex-G.I. with a wad of money and a flair with a pen, but that doesn't mean the movie in question will evolve beyond a cut-rate Peyton Place. Some Came Running starts with promise, as Ol' Blue Eyes drifts into town and dredges up all sort of troubling history with his family, but ends up being a kind of tepid love triange involving Frank, a luscious blonde, and Shirley Maclaine. In the end, some do come running in a memorable yet odd finale, but they just don't get there fast enough to elevate the story into the classic some think it is. Based on a James Jones novel.

Guys And Dolls Review


Very Good
Marlon Brando's musical debut. Really. And he isn't half-bad. Can you imagine Brando in the same role today? Do yourself a favor and check out Guys And Dolls -- an American classic including the tunes "Luck Be a Lady Tonight" and "I Got the Horse Right Here."

Robin And The 7 Hoods Review


OK
The legend of Robin Hood gets a curious and not entirely successful updating with Frank Sinatra's Robin and the 7 Hoods, with Sinatra taking the role of a 1930s gangster in Chicago -- at least an alternate-universe version sans Al Capone.

Sinatra plays a low-level gangster named Robbo, and his band of merry men (with usuals Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr., plus a cryptically cast Bing Crosby) battles the malicious big-time hood Guy Gisborne (Peter Falk, quite funny here). Things aren't going so well until Robbo comes across $50 grand he refuses to accept. He ends up donating the money to charity -- and suddenly, the legend of Robin Hood, who robs from the rich and gives to the poor, is born.

Continue reading: Robin And The 7 Hoods Review

The Man With The Golden Arm Review


Good
Otto Preminger turns in this interesting, early attempt at the drug drama, and it's probably not what you're expecting. Frank Sinatra turns in a credible performance as a reformed heroin addict straight out of the joint -- and finds his options aren't so sweet upon his return to the world. Dreaming of a job as a jazz drummer, he instead falls back into his "golden armed" card dealing job... not to mention a return bout with the H.

Things don't turn out too well for Frankie Machine (Sinatra), as the sauce is constantly calling (and causing his drummin' arms to jitter), he has to resort to cheating at card games, and then there's his wife (Eleanor Parker), who's bound to a wheelchair, not to mention her many neuroses.

Continue reading: The Man With The Golden Arm Review

The Manchurian Candidate (1962) Review


Extraordinary
Possibly John Frankenheimer's finest film, The Manchurian Candidate speaks to the Red Scare, the horrors of war, paranoid fears of brainwashing -- all tied in with the game of Solitaire. Frankenheimer owes a lot to George Axelrod's script and Richard Condon's gripping novel, which tells the story of a perfectly brainwashed soldier (during the Korean War), played by Laurence Harvey, who becomes a no-remorse assassin after capture and brianwashing by the enemy. His target and handler are both kept as mysteries until the end, but it's Frank Sinatra as an old war buddy who's suffering terrible nightmares that brings it all to light.

The film, as compelling as it is, is almost undone by Sinatra's performance, which is capable but unequal to his co-stars. Sinatra, of course, had so much power during the making of the film, that he's never really pushed for a good take. As a result, weaker scenes have been left in, presumably due to Sinatra's notorious unwillingness to do retakes. Too bad, because they're needed here badly. It's little matter, though: The Manchurian Candidate's classic structure and breakneck pacing are a perfect match for the movie's incredible story punch to the gut. George Axelrod's script turns Richard Condon's novel into classic cinema. Its suspense is gripping, and its biting political statement (lambasting McCarthyism deeply) is unparalleled in cinema this side of a Michael Moore movie.

Continue reading: The Manchurian Candidate (1962) Review

Ocean's Eleven (1960) Review


Good
Implausible yet wholly unforgettable, Ocean's Eleven is as much fun as it is a misogynistic relic of a bygone era. Essentially, the Rat Pack of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., and Peter Lawford are playing themselves as ex-military playboy buddies who decide to pull off a daring heist on New Year's Eve, robbing five Las Vegas casinos in one fell swoop. As it turns out, the heist itself is kind of a forgettable letdown, as is the aftermath involving an investigation into the matter by Lawford's character's future stepfather (Cesar Romero). Even the setup takes close to an hour, as Billy Ocean (Sinatra) woos his lady and slowly gathers his crew -- all while Martin and Davis provide musical accompaniment. The end result is more than two hours of heist work that would make David Mamet cringe.

So why watch Sinatra and his 10 (not 11) ex-military buddies romp through their kinda town? Ocean's Eleven is the kind of movie you turn on and just hang out to, just like the Rat Pack would have done, as you enjoy a scotch and soda on a Saturday afternoon while Dean Martin croons "Ain't that a kick in the head..." in the background. Then you'd go bowling in an orange sweater to talk about the job. When it's over, you won't feel like you've bettered yourself in any way, but you might feel just an inch of kinship with a bygone era when Vegas was black tie-only and when a woman's place was in a distant, supporting role. (Just kidding, dames.)

Continue reading: Ocean's Eleven (1960) Review

That's Entertainment! Review


Very Good
Like no other industry, Hollywood has the unique ability to celebrate itself. That's Entertainment! is nothing but the unabashed patting of itself on the back, but damn if it isn't a film that's as important as any other.

That's Entertainment! -- which would spawn two sequels and another DVD of extras (available on the box set, see right) -- is more accurately a celebration of MGM and its legacy of movie musicals. Shot in 1974, the film takes us on a tour of MGM's then-sprawling backlot (which was torn down shortly thereafter), radically contrasting the dilapidated sets with the films that were originally shot on them. Stars like Sinatra, Astaire, Crosby, Kelly, Minnelli, and Reynolds (Debbie, not Burt) are our tour guides, hosting us on our walkthrough the back lot and introducing the clips of past films starring themselves and their friends.

Continue reading: That's Entertainment! Review

4 For Texas Review


Bad
One horrible idea from start to finish -- perhaps the Ishtar of its era. In fact, 4 for Texas has a lot in common with that film -- big stars (Frank and Dino), a desert setting, and a series of failed attempts at comedy. They even brought in The Three Stooges but nothing can help this train wreck, as our two Rat Packers and two of their favorite gals (Anita Ekberg and Ursula Andress) spar over the poker table in 1870s Galveston.

Continue reading: 4 For Texas Review

Frank Sinatra

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Frank Sinatra

Date of birth

12th December, 1915

Date of death

14th May, 1998

Occupation

Musician

Sex

Male

Height

1.72






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Frank Sinatra Movies

The Wrecking Crew - Featurette And Clips Trailer

The Wrecking Crew - Featurette And Clips Trailer

Through the 1960s, a collection of Los Angeles musicians worked together in order to support...

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Guys and Dolls Trailer

Guys and Dolls Trailer

Guys and DollsTrailerOne of the greatest Broadway musicals, Guys and Dolls will be available to...

Ocean's Eleven (1960) Movie Review

Ocean's Eleven (1960) Movie Review

Implausible yet wholly unforgettable, Ocean's Eleven is as much fun as it is a misogynistic...

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