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When Marnie Was There Review

Very Good

Japan's Studio Gibli has been responsible for some of the finest animated movies in recent decades, from 2003's Oscar-winning Spirited Away to last year's beautiful The Tale of the Princess Kaguya. Now adapted by Disney with a starry Western voice cast, their films are reaching a wider audience. And this remarkably moving drama shows how complex an animated movie should be, skilfully grappling with grown-up themes through a child's perspective.

The story comes from the Joan G. Robinson novel about Anna (voiced by Hailee Steinfeld in the English-language version), a 12-year-old who lives in Sapporo with her foster mother Yoriko (Geena Davis). But Anna isn't like the other giggly girls at school, and after an asthma attack, she moves to the countryside to live with Aunt Setsu and Uncle Kiyomasa (Grey Griffin and John C. Reilly). They give her plenty of space to explore the area, and when she spots an abandoned seaside mansion, she is unexpectedly drawn to it, befriending Marnie (Kiernan Skipka), the free-spirited girl who lives there. Anna understands that Marnie is an imaginary friend, then is surprised to find Marnie's diary hidden behind a bookshelf in the rambling house.

The twisty plot incorporates a range of elements that keep the audience off-balance: Is this a ghost story? Is Anna mentally unstable because of her difficult background? But the film is much deeper than that, and as Anna takes a fiercely original journey to self-discovery, the film touches on all kinds of resonant themes. For example, Anna struggles with her self-image, never believing that she's a talented artist, although she clearly is. This has left her feeling like no one else likes her either. So it's both fascinating and moving to watch her blossoming relationships with both the young girl Sayaka (Ava Acres) and the older woman Hisako (Vanessa Williams) who paints by the seaside. Both offer emotional insight into Anna's story.

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When Marnie Was There Trailer


From the legendary Academy Award-winning animation house Studio Ghibli (Spirited Away, Arrietty, The Tale of The Princess Kaguya), comes the haunting and touching tale When Marnie Was There. A beautiful story about ever-lasting friendship based on the beloved young adult novel of the same name by Joan G. Robinson. When Marnie Was There is another superb addition to Ghibli's well-loved catalogue, receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Animated Feature this year.

Geena Davis - 68th Annual DGA Awards 2016 held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza, DGA Awards - Century City, California, United States - Saturday 6th February 2016

Geena Davis
Geena Davis
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Geena Davis - 68th Annual DGA Awards 2016 held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza, DGA Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 6th February 2016

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Reza Jarrahy , Geena Davis - Premiere Of Walt Disney Pictures And Lucasfilm's "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" at TCL Theater, Disney - Hollywood, California, United States - Monday 14th December 2015

Reza Jarrahy and Geena Davis
Geena Davis and Reza Jarrahy
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Reza Jarrahy and Geena Davis
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Geena Davis

Reza Jarrahy , Geena Davis - Celebrities attend Premiere Of Walt Disney Pictures And Lucasfilm's "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" at the Dolby Theatre, TCL Chinese Theatre and El Capitan Theatre. at Dolby Theatre, TCL Chinese Theatre, El Capitan Theatre, Disney, Dolby Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 15th December 2015

Reza Jarrahy and Geena Davis

Geena Davis - Women in the World Summit held at Cadogan Hall - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 8th October 2015

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Geena Davis - Geena Davis arrives back at her London hotel - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 7th October 2015

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Geena Davis
Geena Davis

Geena Davis - BFI London Film Festival opening night premiere of 'Suffragette' - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 8th October 2015

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Geena Davis

Geena Davis - BFI London Film Festival opening night premiere of 'Suffragette' - Arrivals at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 7th October 2015

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Geena Davis
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Geena Davis - Guest attends the BFI London Film Festival premiere of Suffragette at Odean Leicester London Square on 7th of October 2015 - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 7th October 2015

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Geena Davis
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Geena Davis - The premiere of Suffragette during London Film Festival at Odeon, Leicester Square, London, England- 07.10.15. - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 7th October 2015

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In A World Trailer


Carol is a successful vocal coach with an extraordinary talent for accents, even training the likes of Eva Longoria for acting roles. However, her one ambition remains practically unattainable - to become a voiceover star. With her father, a talented master of voiceovers himself, showing little confidence in her because of the fact that she is a woman along with her own struggle to sound foreboding and intimidating, Carol seems destined to coach people on accents for the rest of her career.  Can Carol coach herself to become one of very few voiceover legends, or will her own talent fail her at the last hurdle?

Continue: In A World Trailer

Thelma & Louise Review


Essential
Thelma & Louise is a landmark film, one that defines the cinematic terrain for female empowerment and one that effortlessly blends powerful ideas about gender with an endlessly engaging story. The film weaves a story about women in distress, who come from depressed backgrounds and seedy locales, which is not entirely different from any prototypical Lifetime Movie of the Week. The genius of Ridley Scott's direction and Callie Khouri's groundbreaking screenplay is that they allow the film to flirt with standard archetypal conventions, all the while upending conventional notions of women -- particularly women in the sort of situation Thelma and Louise find themselves in.

The movie jumps headfirst into the action without any necessary build-up or labored background. We meet Louise, a headstrong waitress, and her younger, flighty friend Thelma (Geena Davis) as they finalize plans for their road trip. Nothing more or less complicated than that. Where they are going is fairly vague; why they are going is more telling: their explicit purpose in taking a trip is to escape from the men in their lives. Jimmy (Michael Madsen), Louise's longtime casual partner, is a gruff mechanic who loves Louise, but doesn't know how to show it. Darryl (Christopher McDonald), Thelma's husband, is a plain loser, a carpet salesman with a cheesy mustache, bouffant-fro, and a lack of respect for his wife.

Continue reading: Thelma & Louise Review

Fletch Review


Very Good
If you were in junior high or high school when Fletch came out, the movie holds enormous nostalgia value, particularly if you also happened to live in L.A. at the time (like me). Fletch revealed the L.A. that its denizens knew well -- the grungy beaches, the sun-cracked streets, the drab apartment buildings. Fletch's Lakers fetish, and the offices of the Los Angeles Times-like newspaper where he worked completed the L.A. milieu that audiences here immediately hooked into. What's more, we got Chevy Chase at his wise-ass best, in a crime caper tailored to the Beverly Hills Cop crowd (of which I was an admiring member), and thrumming with Harold Faltermeyer on the soundtrack. Sure, Faltermeyer's synthesizers sound supremely cheesy today, but this was the '80s, man. And nothing speaks the '80s like Faltermeyer's Casio keyboards, tuneful yet pulsing with that moneyed urban vibe; I think of it as the safe, consumer-friendly edge of high '80s decadence.

On first viewing (the movie's opening weekend), I admit I didn't get all of Fletch's jokes, but found myself pleasantly amused. Twenty-two years later, I get all the jokes, but I remain only pleasantly amused, nothing more, nothing less. This is a comfort movie -- smart and sassy enough to make good company, but a notch short of brilliant.

Continue reading: Fletch Review

The Accidental Tourist Review


Very Good
I hate to travel. And so it's with some level of empathy that I relate to William Hurt's titular character in The Accidental Tourist. The author of travel guide books for people who dislike travel, Hurt's Macon Leary doesn't like much of anything (he avoids the movies because they make everything look to "close up").

After the death of a child and the departure of his wife (Kathleen Turner), Leary's funk seems unstoppable. Enter Muriel (Geena Davis), who starts out training Leary's dog and eventually moves on to training Leary, too. Their unlikely romance comprises the bulk of the movie, as Leary slowly learns how to love through the ministrations of the exceedingly quirky Muriel.

Continue reading: The Accidental Tourist Review

Stuart Little 2 Review


Very Good
The term "little" works well in describing Rob Minkoff's Stuart Little 2. After all, this cuddly sequel to the 1999 hit is a little more visually polished, a little funnier, and a little more madcap. However, given the film's thin little plot and threadbare character development, there also appears to be little reason to make a Stuart sequel, save for lining the pockets of those involved with a little more money.

Little 2 starts off strong enough, reintroducing dad Fredrick (Hugh Laurie), mom Eleanor (Geena Davis), son George (Jonathan Lipnicki), and adopted child Stuart (voice of Michael J. Fox), who's actually a talking mouse. Since last we met the Little clan, the family has added baby girl Martha, which gives Eleanor someone else to dote over besides her pint-sized sons. Speaking of, Stuart's depressed because George is outgrowing the novelty of having a kid brother.

Continue reading: Stuart Little 2 Review

Cutthroat Island Review


Bad
Before there was Waterworld, there was Cutthroat Island, an overwrought period pirate movie that cost $92 million to make and earned about $12 million in the theaters. Put simply, this is The Goonies with grown-ups. Only the grown-ups should be embarrassed.

The Accidental Tourist Review


Very Good
I hate to travel. And so it's with some level of empathy that I relate to William Hurt's titular character in The Accidental Tourist. The author of travel guide books for people who dislike travel, Hurt's Macon Leary doesn't like much of anything (he avoids the movies because they make everything look to "close up").

After the death of a child and the departure of his wife (Kathleen Turner), Leary's funk seems unstoppable. Enter Muriel (Geena Davis), who starts out training Leary's dog and eventually moves on to training Leary, too. Their unlikely romance comprises the bulk of the movie, as Leary slowly learns how to love through the ministrations of the exceedingly quirky Muriel.

Continue reading: The Accidental Tourist Review

The Long Kiss Goodnight Review


Good
The much-publicized ballyhoo over The Long Kiss Goodnight relates largely to the $4 million paid for Shane Black's script. The question everyone is asking is, was it worth it?

Well, yes and no. Opening weekend is sure to bring in moviegoers in droves enthralled by the sight of Geena Davis with a blonde dye-job, but more discriminating viewers will probably be put-off by the plot holes, inconsistencies, and downright silliness of the film. I mean, how many times can you outrun an explosion in one film, anyway?

Continue reading: The Long Kiss Goodnight Review

Beetlejuice Review


Very Good
Tim Burton had it down pat. Hair disheveled, pallid features, the director of Pee-Wee's Big Adventure surprised Hollywood with a goth-geek style that could only be described as quirky before everything became quirky. He was the animator from the shadows who brought macabre and heartbreaking life to his early animated shorts, toy box allure to his first feature film. While Pee-Wee's Big Adventure was a hit, it was only a brief glimpse of the sideshow theatricality Burton would employ on his second feature, the riotous and ghoulish Beetlejuice.

Beetlejuice is really a simple fairy tale. Two newly dead newly weds, Adam (Alec Baldwin) and Barbara Maitland (Geena Davis), want to rid their rustic home of the gaudy yuppie transplants, the Dietz's, who've taken up residence. When old-fashioned ghost moves like rattling chains in the attic fails, they find they need the help of a "bio-exorcist," a grungy specter named Betelgeuse (Michael Keaton), who will guarantee to rid the home of unwanted occupants. That is, for a price.

Continue reading: Beetlejuice Review

Stuart Little 2 Review


OK

A significant improvement over its plotless, meandering predecessor, "Stuart Little 2" is fun-loving, low calorie, big-city adventure for the seamlessly computer-animated talking mouse with the effervescent voice of Michael J. Fox.

In this sequel the fuzzy, Lilliputian adopted son of the Little clan -- which includes Stuart's human brother (Jonathan Lipnicki) and his silly, sacchariney, storybook-perfect parents (Hugh Laurie and Geena Davis) -- brings home a spirited sweetheart of a canary named Margalo (Melanie Griffith's voice) after rescuing her from a falcon.

When she later disappears -- along with Mrs. Little's wedding ring -- naive, good-hearted Stuart is convinced the falcon has snatched her away and sets out on a rescue mission, dragging along a very reluctant Snowball, the Littles' pampered house cat with the Vaudevillian voice of Nathan Lane.

Continue reading: Stuart Little 2 Review

Geena Davis

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Geena Davis

Date of birth

21st January, 1956

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.83




Geena Davis Movies

When Marnie Was There Movie Review

When Marnie Was There Movie Review

Japan's Studio Gibli has been responsible for some of the finest animated movies in recent...

When Marnie Was There Trailer

When Marnie Was There Trailer

From the legendary Academy Award-winning animation house Studio Ghibli (Spirited Away, Arrietty, The Tale of...

In a World... Movie Review

In a World... Movie Review

After playing comical sidekicks in rom-coms like No Strings Attached and What Happens in Vegas,...

In A World Trailer

In A World Trailer

Carol is a successful vocal coach with an extraordinary talent for accents, even training the...

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Stuart Little 2 Movie Review

Stuart Little 2 Movie Review

The term "little" works well in describing Rob Minkoff's Stuart Little 2. After all,...

The Long Kiss Goodnight Movie Review

The Long Kiss Goodnight Movie Review

The much-publicized ballyhoo over The Long Kiss Goodnight relates largely to the $4 million paid...

Beetlejuice Movie Review

Beetlejuice Movie Review

Tim Burton had it down pat. Hair disheveled, pallid features, the director of Pee-Wee's Big...

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