Gene Hackman Page 2

Gene Hackman

Gene Hackman Quick Links

News Film Music Quotes RSS

A Jamie Foxx As Electro Inspired Top 5 Superhero Villains!


Jamie Foxx Tom Hardy Heath Ledger Danny Devito Gene Hackman

With Jamie Foxx’s heavily rumoured inclusion in The Amazing Spiderman 2, we’ve racked our brains, and think he’ll do well to get into this top 5 of superhero villains with his mooted role as Electro.

Micky Rourke as Whiplash – Iron Man 2

Continue reading: A Jamie Foxx As Electro Inspired Top 5 Superhero Villains!

Gene Hackman Donated Clothes To The Homeless Man He Slapped


Gene Hackman

Actor Gene Hackman had given clothes, money and the odd ride to the homeless man he slapped in New Mexico this week, Fox News reports. 

It's a story corroborated by the homeless man, who confirmed that he'd received help from the Oscar winning actor, but it was the violent altercation that they didn't agree on. Bruce Becker, 63, said he was hit 10 to 12 times by the tough-guy actor, but Hackman says he slapped the man once. Becker said he told Hackman, "Gene, you are just another Clint Eastwood, you are nothing but an empty chair," an apparent reference to Eastwood's Republican National Convention appearance this summer. That's when Hackman went "ballistic" and began "pummeling" him, he told officers. Hackman, 82, told police Becker became angry when he refused to give him money, and that after some names were thrown, the homeless man's threatening movements lead him to give him a swift slap, at which point they both fell to the ground. Police say Hackman acted in self-defense and no charges have been filed.

TMZ had reported that Hackman "pimp-slapped" the homeless man, in a perpetuation of what can only be described as a ridiculous scene. We've only just seen the end of 'happy-slapping', please don't say we're in line for its deformed cousin, 'Hackman-slapping'. Contact Music denounces all types all violence. We're a tranquil bunch. 

Continue reading: Gene Hackman Donated Clothes To The Homeless Man He Slapped

Gene Hackman Had Provided Clothes For Homeless Man He Slapped


Gene Hackman Ray Romano

Gene Hackman knew the homeless man that he slapped on a downtown Santa Fe street this week, according to The New Mexican newspaper. Police reports provide more detail on the incident, which doesn't appear to be as straight forward as first thought.

Hackman has provided the homeless man, Bruce Becker, 63, with clothes, money and rides for a number of years though their relationship turned sour in a matter of moments this week. The actor and his wife were walking on Marcy Street near Washington Avenue when Becker approached him. After refusing to provide more help, Hackman told the homeless man to "get a job." Suddenly, Becker became angry and called Hackman's wife a vulgar name, which is when the French Connection star struck him in the side of the head. Becker told police that he - quite cleverly - responded, "Gene, you are just another Clint Eastwood, you are nothing but an empty chair."

Hackman has a small cut on his hand, while there were no visible injuries on Becker. Neither was charged with a crime.  The actor, now 82, last appeared in the underwhelming comedy 'Welcome to Mooseport' with Ray Romano.

Continue reading: Gene Hackman Had Provided Clothes For Homeless Man He Slapped

A Week In News Featuring: Star Wars, Hurricane Sandy, Skyfall, Taylor Swift, Tom Cruise, Lindsay Lohan, Anderson Cooper And Much More


The Dark Side? Star Wars fans are split as to the suitability of the franchise’s new home at Disney? What we do know is that there’s going to be plenty more Star Wars movies and it’s likely the creative minds behind recent hits The Avengers, Pirates of the Caribbean and WALL-E may well come up with something special.

A Week In News - 31st October 2012

Oh, Sandy:  As Hurricane Sandy forced the cancellation of television shows and gigs across New York this week, there was one stoic New Yorker who wasn’t having any of it. Veteran host David Letterman went ahead with his late night talk show, welcoming guest Denzel Washington, though the pair chatted…alone.

Only Way is Up for Skyfall: Congratulations to Skyfall director Sam Mendes and Bond star Daniel Craig this week after news that the new movie took £20 million at the UK box office. It was the biggest opening yet for 007 and sets the movie up nicely for its US release next month.

Continue reading: A Week In News Featuring: Star Wars, Hurricane Sandy, Skyfall, Taylor Swift, Tom Cruise, Lindsay Lohan, Anderson Cooper And Much More

Homeless Man Insults Gene Hackman's Wife, Gets Slapped In The Face


Gene Hackman

Gene Hackman allegedly slapped a homeless man who called his wife a c*** outside a New Mexico restaurant.

TMZ learned that Hackman felt threatened by the man approaching him in the street and when he called Hackman’s wife Betsy a rather unsavoury name, Hackman struck Bruce Becker across the face.

Unfortunately for Hackman, who was trying to defend his wife’s honour, Becker went and called the cops, having seen exactly where Hackman and his wife had headed for dinner. Luckily for Hackman, the police were sympathetic to his plight and decided that – as he had felt threatened by Becker approaching him and his wife – he was technically acting in self-defence and let him off without any charges. Becker hadn’t visibly been injured and so the movie star walked.

Continue reading: Homeless Man Insults Gene Hackman's Wife, Gets Slapped In The Face

Class Action Review


Very Good
Class Action is solid, well-made, engaging. In case you were wondering, mark that comment down as a positive review with a dash of disappointment. This movie is, very simply, a good story well-told, but it holds the capacity to do much more. There are moments when the film sears straight into the heart and mind, yet others when it clings a little too tightly to the safety of conventional drama.

Gene Hackman and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio go head-to-head as an estranged father and daughter who face off in a high-stakes class action lawsuit. Hackman plays Jedediah Tucker Ward, whose quick wit and dedication to defending the little guy (sometimes to the little guy's peril) has made him a legendary hot-shot attorney. Mastrantonio plays his daughter Maggie, who has never had a good relationship with her father, but who did grow to share his passion for being a lawyer. The one major difference: Jedediah is a man on a mission to topple the world's evil, and Maggie works in defense of that evil. She has just made partner at a flashy firm, and is carrying on an affair with one of her superiors (Colin Friels).

Continue reading: Class Action Review

French Connection II Review


Good
Popeye Doyle is back -- seriously, what else could 20th Century Fox choose to do after the box-office bonanza of The French Connection and an Oscar win? -- and he's still on the case.

In a lot of ways, French Connection II -- that's right, no "the" -- makes sense. The abrupt ending of the original French Connection had French bad guy Alain Charnier(Fernando Rey) escaping the cops despite dozens surrounding him in a New York warehouse, never to be found. Not a very satisfying ending to have our hero come up emptyhanded -- and not just that, we're merely told about it via title card right before the credits roll!

Continue reading: French Connection II Review

The Quick And The Dead Review


Excellent
All right, all right, I'm sorry I haven't been seeing the movies I should. I haven't seen A Simple Plan yet, I admit it. Everyone's been nagging me, bothering me about it, telling me: "James, it's such a great film." But I haven't seen it.

Anyway, that apology aside, I'm very glad I took time to watch Sam Raimi's 1995 film The Quick and the Dead.

Continue reading: The Quick And The Dead Review

Narrow Margin (1990) Review


Good
It was an odd choice to remake a mediocre 1950s noir, but at least Gene Hackman is engaging as ever in the leading role, however slightly written it is. The cat-and-mouse game of the original is largely intact, with mobsters chasing after a woman (Anne Archer) who witnessed a murder, but whom they've never actually seen. Oh... and it's all on a train bound for Vancouver, which is, I guess, what the title vaguely alludes to. The film tragically never generates a lot of suspense, and Hackman and Archer never really generate much chemistry. The best part of the film is the very beginning, when Archer witnesses the murder of an all-too-briefly-appearing J.T. Walsh.

The Quick And The Dead Review


Excellent
All right, all right, I'm sorry I haven't been seeing the movies I should. I haven't seen A Simple Plan yet, I admit it. Everyone's been nagging me, bothering me about it, telling me: "James, it's such a great film." But I haven't seen it.

Anyway, that apology aside, I'm very glad I took time to watch Sam Raimi's 1995 film The Quick and the Dead.

Continue reading: The Quick And The Dead Review

Young Frankenstein Review


Essential
Mel Brooks was just about at the top of his game back in 1974, when he directed both Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein. Young Frankenstein tells the tale of an heir (Gene Wilder) of the original Frank, who inherits his creepy castle (shot in the original castle from the first Frankenstein movie) and starts work anew on his ancestor's experiments. Of course, this is courtesy of Mel Brooks, and it's perfectly parodied -- probably the best horror spoof ever made and a far cry ahead of Brooks' later Dracula: Dead and Loving It gag. Wilder and Peter Boyle (as the monster) are hysterical, but it's Teri Garr who steals the show as Frankenstein's buxom and considerably vapid assistant. The special edition DVD is especially recommended -- with a handful of outtakes and deleted scenes (though none are nearly as funny as what made the final cut).

Marooned Review


Very Good
Remarkably prescient, this 1969 drama about astronauts stuck in space, unable to return home due to a rocket malfunction preceded the real Apollo 13 drama by only one year. For its era, the special effects are impressive, though the plot -- which involves a massive rescue attempt that sees not one but two spacecraft attempting to rendezvous with our heros -- is on the far-fetched side. Kudos for impressive realism in its treatment of the effects of the lack of oxygen on the crew and its long periods of quiet frustration, a great respite from typical in-your-face adventure fare.

Superman Review


Very Good
Yeah, it was 1978 when Superman first hit theaters in the version most of us remember -- with Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel and Marlon Brando as his disco-inspired pop. Superman is a lovable epic full of quaint nostalgia and incredible mysteries of logic (because if the earth spun the other way round, time would apparently reverse... riiiight). The story tells the bulk of the Superman legend -- his escape from Krypton, coming to terms with his powers as a youth in Smallville, moving to big old Metropolis and becoming Clark Kent (and falling for crusty Lois Lane), and dealing with a Lex Luthor (Gene Hackman, excellently over the top) plan to buy up real estate in Nevada and then destroy most of California, thus making his new coastline worth millions. Watch for Terence Stamp's Zod in the first scene -- he'll be back to rule as one of cinema's great villains in Superman II.

Continue reading: Superman Review

Superman II Review


Good
"Kneel before Zod."

Superman II had all the signposts of a disaster. Richard Donner, who shot much of the footage during the production of the first Superman, found himself forced away from the movie and replaced by Richard Lester, who claimed never to have heard of Superman before signing on to the franchise. To top it off, Marlon Brando sued to cut out all his scenes as Jor-El. And Gene Hackman was unavailable to shoot after Lester took the reins.

Continue reading: Superman II Review

Crimson Tide Review


Very Good
The Cold War may be over, but it lives on through films like Crimson Tide.

Crimson Tide is a new action/psychodrama about a mutiny aboard a U.S. nuclear submarine. When World War III is about to erupt thanks to Russian coup-artists, the USS Alabama, helmed by Captain Frank Ramsey (Gene Hackman) is sent to prepare for the worst. When the order to launch comes in, Ramsey's executive officer, Lt. Commander Ron Hunter (Denzel Washington), clashes with the Captain over a last-minute, incomplete order which could recall the missile launch. The result is mutiny, with half the ship siding with the Captain's single-minded, stubborn decision to fire, half standing with Hunter, who wants a confirmation before blowing up the world.

Continue reading: Crimson Tide Review

Superman IV: The Quest For Peace Review


Terrible
Christopher Reeve allegedly insisted that if he was going to slum his way through a fourth Superman movie, it would have to involve a story about nuclear disarmament. Noble, yes, but after Supe tosses all the nukes into the sun, Lex Luthor tosses token villain "Nuclear Man" (Mark Pillow, whose career was promptly killed after this debacle) into the mix. Pathetic battle, combined with the usual "hide that secret identity!" subplot, ensues. Worst of all are the special effects: I didn't think you could make an entire movie on a bluescreen in 1987, but damn if director Sidney J. Furie doesn't try. I've also never seen people falling sooo sloooooowlyyyyyyyyyy. Avoid!

Enemy Of The State Review


OK
It was a disappointing day on many levels. First I show up to the theater and pay $2.75 for a single slice of pizza. I take it into the theater and didn't see the Star Wars: The Phantom Menace preview that I wanted to see. After that, I watch the disappointing movie Enemy of the State

Enemy of the State stars Will Smith as Robert Dean, an attorney who is handed a video tape by an old friend running for his life, who just happened to come across Smith in a lingerie store. The problem? It shows an NSA agent killing a congressman. The mastermind behind that murder and others to come is agent Reynolds (Jon Voight). The NSA has Dean's life under 24-hour surveillance. They have bugs in his pants, his cell phone, his pen, (is this beginning to sound familiar?) Dean's only chance of survival is a man named Brill, an acquaintance he used for some of his cases. Gene Hackman plays Brill, and his character is the guy who is just so darn convenient to have around in the time of crisis.

Continue reading: Enemy Of The State Review

A Bridge Too Far Review


Good
There are star-studded projects, and then there's A Bridge Too Far, a World War II movie the likes of which would cost upwards of $300 million to make today. There are lots of bridges in the film, actually: The Allies aim to capture a series of them in German-occupied Holland as part of Operation Market-Garden, a byzantine plot that would theoretically cripple the German war machine in western Europe, where Germany is already on the run. However, Allied mistakes and an unexpected amount of German firepower nip the plan in the bud. The film is more a showcase for some searing acting -- and at three hours long, there's plenty of it -- than it is a classic war film. The battle scenes just don't come across as impressively as in other films of the era -- the fact that VW Beetles with plastic tank shells on them were used in lieu of some of the Panzers is just one sign that all the budget went to that exhaustive cast list.

Young Frankenstein Review


Essential
Mel Brooks was just about at the top of his game back in 1974, when he directed both Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein. Young Frankenstein tells the tale of an heir (Gene Wilder) of the original Frank, who inherits his creepy castle (shot in the original castle from the first Frankenstein movie) and starts work anew on his ancestor's experiments. Of course, this is courtesy of Mel Brooks, and it's perfectly parodied -- probably the best horror spoof ever made and a far cry ahead of Brooks' later Dracula: Dead and Loving It gag. Wilder and Peter Boyle (as the monster) are hysterical, but it's Teri Garr who steals the show as Frankenstein's buxom and considerably vapid assistant. The special edition DVD is especially recommended -- with a handful of outtakes and deleted scenes (though none are nearly as funny as what made the final cut).

Get Shorty Review


OK
The cryptic title of Get Shorty should forewarn you of the confusion to come when the film actually starts. To be honest, I >still< don't really know what it's supposed to mean. Initially, I was pretty excited about the prospects for Get Shorty: it's John Travolta's much-anticipated follow-up to Pulp Fiction; great actors Gene Hackman and Rene Russo both star; the well-regarded Elmore Leonard penned the novel that the movie is based on. What a disappointment!

The story goes: Travolta is Chili Palmer, a small time Miami hood, a "shylock" whose job is essentially coercing money out of people. His boss sends Chili on a chase for some questionably-raised funds; in Vegas, another contact sends him to L.A. to track down an entirely unrelated debtor, Harry Zimm (Hackman). And there are a few drug dealers who have their payoff stuck in a locker at LAX.

Continue reading: Get Shorty Review

Gene Hackman

Gene Hackman Quick Links

News Film Music Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Advertisement
Advertisement

Gene Hackman Movies

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.