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Gina Gershon

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Gina Gershon , Robert Dekeyser - Opening night of Verdi's Otello at the Metropolitan Opera House - Arrivals at Lincoln Center - New York, New York, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

Gina Gershon and Robert Dekeyser
Gina Gershon and Robert Dekeyser

Gina Gershon - Hollywood Domino & Bovet 1822's 8th Annual Pre-Oscar Hollywood Domino Gala & Tournament at Sunset Tower Hotel - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 20th February 2015

Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon

Gina Gershon - Celebrities attend Tom Ford Autumn/Winter 2015 Womenswear Collection Presentation - Red Carpet at Milk Studios. at Milk Studios - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 20th February 2015

Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon

Gina Gershon - A variety of stars were snapped as they attended the 8th annual pre-Oscar Hollywood Domino Gala & Tournament which was held at the Sunset Tower Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 20th February 2015

Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon

Gina Gershon - Opening night for The Lion at the Lynn Redgrave Theatre - Arrivals. at Lynn Redgrave Theatre, - New York, New York, United States - Sunday 8th February 2015

Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon

Gina Gershon - New York premiere of 'Magic In The Moonlight' at The Paris Theatre - Arrivals - New York, United States - Friday 18th July 2014

Gina Gershon

Gina Gershon - Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction - Red Carpet Arrivals at Sotheby's - Manhattan, New York, United States - Sunday 24th November 2013

Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon

Gina Gershon - The new coffee-table style book documents the elements of rock style that have embodied the music community for decades. Written by John Varvatos with Holly George-Warren, the book shares contents of Varvatos' personal notebook that he has kept over the years, revealing his perspective on how rock & roll style and rock photography have influenced his own designs as well as how musicians' evolving styles have impacted fashion and pop culture over the past five decades. - West Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 7th November 2013

Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon

Gina Gershon - Stars turn out for the Project A.L.S. "Tomorrow is Tonight" benefit in New York City. - New York City, NY, United States - Friday 18th October 2013

Gina Gershon
Gina Gershon and Paul Rudd
Gina Gershon

Video - Patrick Wilson And Kid Cudi Among The Many Arrivals At The 'Gravity' NY Premiere - Part 3


The New York premiere of space thriller 'Gravity' brought with it a host of actors and other famous faces from every area of the entertainment world including 'Pieces of April' actress and Oscar nominee Patricia Clarkson, 'Insidious' star Patrick Wilson and rapper/singer Kid Cudi.

Continue: Video - Patrick Wilson And Kid Cudi Among The Many Arrivals At The 'Gravity' NY Premiere - Part 3

Gina Gershon, Vanity Fair and Academy Awards Sunday 22nd February 2009 The 81st Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) - Vanity Fair Party Hollywood, California

Gina Gershon, Vanity Fair and Academy Awards

Delirious Review


Very Good
I have seen Steve Buscemi in person, and he is not particularly ratlike -- he's actually a bit dapper, almost handsome. But on screen, Buscemi persists in embodying the most rodentlike of characters -- twitchy, scraggly, often lurking in the shadows. His voicing of Templeton the (actual) rat in the live-action Charlotte's Web seemed less perfect casting than foregone conclusion.

Buscemi's character in Tom DiCillo's Delirious is Les Galantine, a "licensed professional" photographer who is undistinguished even by paparazzi standards and ratlike even by Buscemi standards. An irritable loner, Les roams alleys and back entrances with a pack of similar-minded (but slightly less desperate) shutterbugs, grasping for shots of stars like pop sensation D'Harma (Alison Lohman). It's at one of these melees that he bumps into the genially homeless Toby (Michael Pitt); soon Toby has a reluctant, unstable ally and a place to stay. Les, in turn, has someone to listen to his rants and delusions, and to accompany him on sad visits to his elderly parents -- unimpressed, of course, with his published pictures.

Continue reading: Delirious Review

P.S. I Love You Review


Weak
Several times a year, greeting cards clutter up a mantel -- their words are filled with sentiment, but they don't really say anything and mean even less to others who idly pick them up, flip through them, and put them down without a second thought. P.S. I Love You is no different from the flimsy, forgettable cards that quickly pile up when stuffed away in a drawer. The film is a variation on the rom-com theme, but instead of pining over an attainable man, our female heroine stews about in the murky emotional aftermath of her husband's death.

Opening with an annoying, clichéd fight between Holly (Hilary Swank) and husband Gerry (Gerard Butler), P.S. I Love You quickly takes a turn for the worse with Gerry's death right after the opening credits. Of course, Gerry was the perfect man and devised a plan to send several letters to his widowed wife to help her through her grief after he's passed away. But the film wheels these emotions with no regard for the impact on the characters. Holly's grief is dealt with the same way the film approaches the couple's happy flashbacks -- barely scratching the surface and relying on the sentimental, such as personal trinkets and highlights from their relationship.

Continue reading: P.S. I Love You Review

Face/off Review


Excellent
It's hard to remember the whooshing sighs of disappointment from his fans that greeted John Woo in 1996 when, after so many half-steps and mis-starts, he made his big Hollywood debut with the stolen-nuke thriller Broken Arrow. Having left the Hong Kong business on a high with 1992's psychotic near-parody Hard Boiled, Woo did a Jean-Claude Van Damme flick -- 1993's Hard Target, which was heavily botched by studio interference but still contained some brilliant work -- before deciding to go seriously Hollywood. For Broken Arrow, he toned down his trademark mix of ultra-violent flourishes and teary-eyed humanism to concentrate on doing a by-the-book mid-'90s action flick that was generic in the extreme but raked in the money. The next year, though, Woo proved it had all just been an extraordinarily canny maneuver to allow him to make Face/Off, possibly the greatest, and definitely the most exuberant, action film to come out of the studio system in that decade.

A schizoid doppelganger mind-bender wrapped around your standard ticking-bomb scenario (it's hidden somewhere in Los Angeles and could take out the whole basin if detonated -- or something), Face/Off is an utterly lunatic film in the best possible way. Originally a futuristic thriller, the script was retooled for a modern-day setting, keeping several of its sci-fi elements but focusing more intently on its personality-shifting aspects which seemed to come straight out of Woo's international breakthrough, The Killer. An FBI agent, Sean Archer (John Travolta) has been hunting jet-set super-criminal Castor Troy (Nicolas Cage) for years. For Archer, it's gone beyond personal to haunted obsession, particularly after Troy tried to shoot Archer but missed and killed his son instead. After a gonzo opening sequence involving a Humvee/private jet showdown on a runway and about ten thousand expended rounds (mostly fired by people flying sideways in slo-mo, of course), Archer's team brings down Troy.

Continue reading: Face/off Review

Man About Town Review


Good
Yeah, that's Ben Affleck grinning out at you from the cover of this direct-to-DVD release, but don't let that turn you off of the film completely. Man About Town may be rehashed from Jerry Maguire and

One Last Thing... Review


OK
One Last Thing... was another one of those experimental films -- experimental from a business standpoint, not from an artistic one -- in which the film would be released in theaters and on DVD on the same day.

I have no idea what theaters played the film -- certainly none in my town -- but you shouldn't have much trouble finding the DVD, a medium to which this movie thoroughly belongs.

Continue reading: One Last Thing... Review

One Tough Cop Review


Weak
One Tough Cop sure makes for one boring movie. This true story of a case in the life of NYC flatfoot Bo Dietl has that "ripped from today's headlines" feeling usually reserved for TV. It's best left there.

I'm Losing You Review


Good
This multi-storied film centers around Langella, dying of cancer, and how his imminent death (and the death of others) impacts the rest of the cast. Throw in another three or four soon-to-be-six-feet-unders (the most memorable and surprising being Elizabeth Perkins as a woman slowly dying of AIDS) and you've got yourself one hell of a depressing movie. Even those who aren't dying are obsessed with it (McCarthy hawks "death futures" -- reselling life insurance policies for dying people). Even if you're perfectly healthy, you'll probably start checking for lumps after this one.

Demonlover Review


Weak
In the cutthroat world of pornographic Japanese animé, she who remains most ruthless wins. At least, that's about as much of an overriding theme as I could glean from Olivier Assayas' visually vivid but narratively scatterbrained Demonlover, a film that begins as a pseudo-thriller concerning espionage at a French conglomerate and ends as an indecipherable mish-mash of technological paranoia and fetishized sex and violence in the Videodrome (and, unfortunately, FearDotCom) mold.

Alternating between French and English, the film hinges on the duplicitous dealings of Diane de Monx (Connie Nielsen), a merciless businesswoman who kicks things off by drugging a fellow employee in an effort to move up the corporate ladder. Now firmly ensconced as second in command at the Volf Group, Diane begins negotiations with animation giant TokyoAnimé, the world's largest and most successful producer of high quality sex cartoons. Diane is, in fact, a double agent working for rival firm Mangatronics, who - recognizing that a deal between Volf and TokyoAnimé would put them out of business - have hired her to sabotage the ongoing talks between the two companies. Unfortunately, despite a veneer of poker-faced iciness, someone is on to Diane's plans, and she suspects that either her antagonistic coworker Elise (Chloë Sevigny) or hunky negotiating partner Hervé (Charles Berling) is the villain attempting to blackmail her.

Continue reading: Demonlover Review

Guinevere Review


Very Good
A curious May-December romance involving a bohemian San Francisco photographer (Rea) who builds a kind of teacher-lover-father-figure relationship with the far-younger Harper (Polley), whom he dubs Guinevere. Think of it as The Professional without all the killing. Turns out our shutterbug has a history of Guineveres, and soon his teeth are falling out and he's dying, and suffice it to say this is where the movie turns bizarre. Poetic, if not altogether meaningful. Jean Smart is particularly apt as Harper's prissy and snobbish mother.

Bound Review


Excellent
Does anyone else out there have a terrible time taking Jennifer Tilly seriously, no matter what role she plays? Well, I do, and her performance in Bound is no exception to the rule.

Here, Tilly plays Violet, a mobster's wife with a plan to make off with $2 million of the Mafia's money. Enlisting the aid of Corky (Showgirls's Gina Gershon), your everyday laborer/lesbian-next-door, the two ladies play a game of double-cross with the mob, with Violet's husband Caesar (Risky Business's Joe Pantoliano) set to take the fall.

Continue reading: Bound Review

Prey For Rock & Roll Review


Bad
In Gina Gershon's labor of love, the general worldview is worse than any other film short of A Clockwork Orange. This pathetic tale of a terrible all-girl (and 75% lesbian) band called, ahem, Clam Dandy, gives us Gershon as frontwoman and day-job tattoo artist, still trying to get her band to the Big Show some 20 years past its prime. But the story (what there is of it) is just a backdrop for some world-class bad tidings: Prey for Rock & Roll (oh, it's a pun!) tells us that getting raped, being addicted to drugs, getting beat up, and even getting run over and killed are all worth it -- if it makes your music even more angry (and thus, good). The only thing worse than the plot itself are the music (good lord) and Gershon's horrid melange of tattoos. Sad.

The Insider Review


Excellent
Listen up! A movie adapted from a magazine article about the making of a four-year old segment of a television program: Does this pitch have you hooked yet? No? Well, despite a potentially dry-as-dust premise, The Insider manages to rise above its inherent limitations and provides a compelling look inside the politics of 60 Minutes and the tobacco industry.

They say you should never see two things being made: Sausage and legislation. Add journalism to that list. I've been in this racket long enough to know that objectivity is painfully lacking in the places you expect to find it the most. Backroom deals make strange bedfellows of interest-conflicted parties (e.g. Time-Warner owns Entertainment Weekly magazine, which reviews Warner Bros. films, etc.) So when 60 Minutes producer Lowell Bergman (Pacino) decided to do a story about the hazards of cigarettes in 1996, he found himself embroiled in controversy.

Continue reading: The Insider Review

Black & White (1998) Review


Weak
A promising thriller noir is ruined in its second half by a meandering plot that tries to get clever but ends up being pretty dumb. Gina Gershon and Rory Cochrane as cops investigating the elusive "inside job" are pretty bland and have no chemistry, even if Gina spends most of the film naked. Never mind the plot.

Lulu On The Bridge Review


OK
Paul Auster (writer of Wayne Wang's Smoke and Blue in the Face) is no stranger to oddball productions. Lulu on the Bridge is another step down the path to David Lynch, with Harvey Keitel as a sax player who gets shot and -- after a miracle recovery that leaves him with one lung -- embarks on an adventure involving Mira Sorvino and a magic rock that glows in the dark. Oh-kayyyyy. It all becomes all-too-apparent what's been going on by the end of this, so after plenty of mood lighting and jazz music, you're released back into the world to completely forget everything you saw. Whatever.

Slackers Review


Bad

Trying to disguise the fact that "Slackers" is really just a paint-by-numbers, boys-will-be-boys college comedy, first-time director Dewey Nicks slathers the flick in Tom Green-style bad taste outrageousness as its misogynistic cool jerk hero (Devon Sawa) lies his way into the bed of the generically gorgeous sweetheart.

A sampling of the movie's let's-see-what-we-can-get-away-with gags: Dave (Sawa) gets orally serviced by his girlfriend's horny middle-aged mom. The girlfriend's comedically creepy stalker does the same for a 70-year-old woman in a hospital bed. Three characters masturbate on screen, one of whom makes a puppet out of his privates in one of many scenes that have nothing to do with the plot and everything to do with pushing the envelope.

If that's the kind of thing you want to pay $8 or $9 to see, then be my guest. If you expect more than bottom-feeder humor from your multiplex experience, then "Slackers" is one frustrating film because buried within these dregs of humor are some audacious comedic gems.

Continue reading: Slackers Review

Guinevere Review


Good

"Guinevere" is a perceptive story of self-discovery, starring the supremely natural Sarah Polley ("Go," "The Sweet Hereafter") as an unmolded, insecure, 20-year-old beauty whose complex, turbulent, sexual and artistic apprentice with a much older man (Stephen Rea) uncages her creative side and her confidence, long suppressed by her dysfunctional, passionless family.

Taking the initiative for the first time in her life, Harper (Polley) abandons her familial tradition of studying law at Harvard after being tenderly seduced by a photographer at a wedding, who recognizes potential in her that no one else has ever seen.

Connie (Rea) takes Harper under his wing, offering her a home in his studio loft in exchange for nothing more -- or so he says -- than her commitment to exploring the artist within under his tutelage.

Continue reading: Guinevere Review

Demonlover Review


Bad

"Demonlover" features a score by art-punk band Sonic Youth that really captures the essence of the film: It's deliberately abrasive, rapidly pulsing electronic black noise that is designed to put the viewer on edge but ultimately signifies nothing.

A discombobulated, pretentious, psycho-sexual excursion into the cold-blooded, under-the-table fringe of 21st century corporate intrigue, it's a self-important drama in which poisoning, kidnapping, breaking and entering, ransacking, blackmail and brainwashing are all in a day's work -- and all add up to an unimaginative, exploitive shock ending.

The concoction of French filmmaker Olivier Assayas ("Irma Vep"), "Demonlover" stars Connie Nielsen ("Gladiator," "One Hour Photo") as Diane, a second-tier envoy for a Paris-based conglomerate that is negotiating a production and distribution deal with a Japanese maker of animated porn.

Continue reading: Demonlover Review

Driven Review


Weak

The spirits of moderately better racing movies like "Grand Prix" and "Days of Thunder" are buried somewhere inside "Driven" -- buried under heaps of clichés, stock characters, video game gimmickry, overly elaborate Ginsu editing, moronically contrived filler sequences, inadequate special effects and about four minutes of plot.

Set in the wound-up world of open-wheel racing, those four minutes go something like this: An irascible, crippled car owner (Burt Reynolds) hires a washed-up driver who once had a promising career (Sylvester Stallone) to help season an unfocused rookie boy-racer (Kip Pardue) so he can beat his rival (Til Schweiger), the reigning circuit champion.

Throw in a subplot in which Kip and Til (what's with these names?) vie for the affections of hottie-of-the-month (and former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model) Estella Warren and a few more sidelines about Sly's catty ex-wife (Gina Gershon) who married another racer (Cristian De La Fuente) and the pretty reporter (Stacy Edwards) he's dating now, and that pretty much takes care of everything except the racing.

Continue reading: Driven Review

The Insider Review


Very Good

Leave it to "Heat" director Michael Mann to make a seat-gripping near-thriller about something as inherently dull as corporate whistle-blowing.

"The Insider" is a freely fictionalized retelling of the events that really got the ball rolling in the current attack on the tobacco industry: When a medical researcher for cigarette maker Brown and Williamson spills his guts to "60 Minutes," it puts CBS into in an ethical tailspin as lawyers come knocking with a broken confidentiality agreement in one hand and a lawsuit in the other.

I know what you're thinking: Yawn!

Continue reading: The Insider Review

Gina Gershon

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Gina Gershon

Date of birth

10th June, 1962

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.68




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Gina Gershon Movies

Inconceivable [2017] Trailer

Inconceivable [2017] Trailer

Angela and Brian have it all; they're both doctors who live in a beautiful house...

Killer Joe Movie Review

Killer Joe Movie Review

This film's unhinged plot constantly catches us off guard with its bizarre twists and turns,...

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One Last Thing... Movie Review

One Last Thing... Movie Review

One Last Thing... was another one of those experimental films -- experimental from a business...

Driven Movie Review

Driven Movie Review

What better way to start an action movie than with... statistics!From that rousing introduction we...

Showgirls Movie Review

Showgirls Movie Review

It's so bad it's good. But hey, it ain't that good.ay?Showgirls is the capper in...

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