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Ashley Madison and James Woods - Ashley Madison and James Woods West Hollywood, California - The 2011 Entertainment Weekly And Women In Film Pre-Emmy Party Sponsored By L'Oreal held at BOA Steakhouse Friday 16th September 2011

Ashley Madison and James Woods
Ashley Madison and James Woods
Ashley Madison and James Woods

James Woods, Ashley Madison and HBO Monday 16th May 2011 James Woods; Ashley Madison HBO presents the premiere of 'Too Big To Fail' based on the book by Andrew Ross Sorkin at the Museum of Modern Art. New York City, USA

James Woods Saturday 13th September 2008 has lunch with a friend at Joans on 3rd Los Angeles, California

James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods

James Woods Tuesday 5th August 2008 has lunch with a friend at cafe Med on Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, California

James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods

James Woods and a lady friend - James Woods and a lady friend Los Angeles, California - attempt to escape photographers after having lunch at Cafe Med in the Sunset Plaza Thursday 17th July 2008

James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend

James Woods and a lady friend - James Woods and a lady friend Los Angeles, California - attempt to escape photographers after having lunch in the Sunset Plaza Thursday 17th July 2008

James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend
James Woods and A Lady Friend

James Woods Friday 9th May 2008 leaving Dan Tana's restaurant Los Angeles, California

James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods

James Woods - Sunday 4th May 2008 at Staples Center Los Angeles, California

James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods

James Woods - Wednesday 5th March 2008 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Los Angeles, California

James Woods
James Woods
James Woods

James Woods Saturday 1st March 2008 6th Annual World Poker Tour Celebrity Invitational held at Commerce Casino - Inside Los Angeles, California

James Woods
James Woods
James Woods

James Woods - James Wood Hollywood, California - Hamilton Behind the Camera Awards held at The Highlands Sunday 11th November 2007

James Woods

James Woods Sunday 29th July 2007 hangs out with friends at a beach party. Woods is currently staring as Sebastian Stark in the drama "Shark" Malibu, California

James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods
James Woods

Surf's Up Trailer


Surf's Up is an animated comedy that delves behind the scenes of the high-octane world of competitive surfing. The film profiles teenage Rockhopper penguin Cody Maverick (Shia LaBeouf), an up-and-coming surfer, as he enters his first pro competition. Followed by a camera crew to document his experiences, Cody leaves his family and home in Shiverpool, Antarctica to travel to Pen Gu Island for the Big Z Memorial Surf Off. 

Continue: Surf's Up Trailer

Once Upon A Time In America Review


OK
I'm as big a fan of misogyny as the next guy, but how did this hateful and often tasteless Godfather ripoff become a classic? What, just because it's four hours long? Robert De Niro and James Woods are never hard to watch, but even here their take on Jewish gangsters in New York from 1900 to 1960 or so wears awfully thin as they brutalize one woman after another and get into the kind of mobster scrapes you've seen in upteen other movies. And after the top names, the talent roster is pretty thin. Treat Williams? Elizabeth McGovern?

Continue reading: Once Upon A Time In America Review

Hercules Review


Good
Tepid Disney animated entry is redeemed by self-referential jokes about merchandising, and James Woods' neat Hades. Probably the beginning of the Disney-mocking-Disney genre of animated films... something which has saved the studio in recent years.

Casino Review


Very Good
The way I see it, Martin Scorsese has one problem: He's in love with the sound of his own voice, as it comes out through the dialogue of films like GoodFellas and now, Casino. Clocking in at three long hours, Casino is an entertaining and engrossing film, but just drags a simple story into a sprawling, epic tale that desperately needs a little trimming.

Based on a true story, Casino is the tale of Sam Rothstein (Robert De Niro), the best of the old bookmakers, who is hand-picked by his mob bosses "Back Home" to go to Las Vegas to run the Tangiers Casino. Sam has to contend with managing the bosses' skim going out the back door, cheats at the tables, the law breathing down his neck, and strung-out hustler Ginger (Sharon Stone), whom Sam falls for, and, despite his better judgment, eventually marries. Add to the mix Nicky Santoro (Joe Pesci), who basically reprises his role from GoodFellas as a "problem solver" with a temper from hell, and it's pure chaos in the high-glamour world of 1973 Las Vegas.

Continue reading: Casino Review

Any Given Sunday Review


Very Good
Football is as engrained in our society's mores as deeply as war, family values, and politics -- at least that's what Oliver Stone would like you to believe. To back up this statement, Any Given Sunday analyzes the effects of a culture that elevates professional athletes and coaches to a plateau where they are immortalized as heroes of the common man. Stone's football fairytale is a culmination of every anecdote, highlight, or soundbite you've ever seen associated with the pigskin, wrapped up in an aesthetically pleasing Christmas package, and sealed with a kiss from team owner Cameron Diaz. Stone aims to please, and he doesn't miss a single cliché of the revered and scrutinized American athlete.

At its core, Any Given Sunday is the story of Miami Sharks coach Tony D'Amato (Al Pacino - The Godfather, Dog Day Afternoon) and his two quarterbacks, Willie Beamen (Jamie Foxx - The Great White Hype, Booty Call) and Cap Rooney (Dennis Quaid - The Big Easy, Innerspace). The quarterback is the most vital position in the game. He is the team spokesperson and field chief, and he serves as a crucial link between coaches, administration, and players. When legendary two-time Pantheon Cup (aka: Super Bowl) champion Cap Bowman ruptures a disk after a bone crushing hit, coach Tony is left with Willie Beamen (Foxx), an athletic, yet untested QB. His team has lost four straight and appears to be plummeting in a downward spiral with the playoffs right around the corner. He's got delusional team owner Christina Pagniacci (Cameron Diaz) and sports analyst Jack Rose (John McGinley, doing his best Jim Rome impersonation) breathing down his neck because of his outdated coaching style, and a team of players he's losing control of.

Continue reading: Any Given Sunday Review

Contact Review


Very Good
Apparently, we are not alone. And we're beaming The Spice Girls into space.

But seriously, Carl Sagan's ode to the superior intelligence of aliens (and how us darned humans mess everything up) is consistently beautiful and interesting, but it never makes a point (except for that bit about the darned humans). The plot, which gives Jodie Foster schematics from space and focuses on the technical and bureaucratic minutiae that go into the construction of an extradimensional travelling device, is rather on the nose -- and the only real surprises in the film come from its obsession with God (in which the late Sagan did not believe) and the complete and utter disappointment received with the aliens are finally revealed.

Continue reading: Contact Review

Once Upon A Time In America Review


OK
I'm as big a fan of misogyny as the next guy, but how did this hateful and often tasteless Godfather ripoff become a classic? What, just because it's four hours long? Robert De Niro and James Woods are never hard to watch, but even here their take on Jewish gangsters in New York from 1900 to 1960 or so wears awfully thin as they brutalize one woman after another and get into the kind of mobster scrapes you've seen in upteen other movies. And after the top names, the talent roster is pretty thin. Treat Williams? Elizabeth McGovern?

Continue reading: Once Upon A Time In America Review

Another Day In Paradise Review


Good
And I thought they already made Drugstore Cowboy. Derivative right down to the cast makeup and survival rate, this story of junkies who use, abuse, steal, and sell has been done over and over. Woods and Griffith keep it fresh, but Larry Clark's (Kids) vision feels surprisingly retreaded.

Diggstown Review


Good
Hardly awful, Diggstown combines two of my favorite movie elements: boxing and con games. Woods and Dern make well-matched hustlers, outdoing one another over a bet as to whether an aging boxer (Gossett) can beat ten local men in the boxing ring inside of 24 hours. Throw in an early Heather Graham appearance and I'll go the distance with this one.

John Carpenter's Vampires Review


Good
I'm a child of the 80s. I like my horror movies, and I like them cheesy. They're not scary to me, they're excuses to get a little closer with my girlfriend, they're ways to enjoy sick comedy in the theatre while the idiot girl's getting gutted. They're my reminder that fiction is more fun than fact. I like them quick, I like them gory, and I like them campy. All of those adjectives are words you can tack on to John Carpenter's Vampires.

Now anyone who has read my review on Halloween will know that I hold this man in no reverence. To be honest, I pretty much hate the bastard. But, I do admit his prowess behind the camera and his ability to scare, although not his creative ability. But this time, he didn't pen the screenplay, so I'm happy. I don't hate his style, I hate his original material. After all, has anyone seen Jim Carrey or Pauly Shore's standup? It sucks. Are they funny people, yes.

Continue reading: John Carpenter's Vampires Review

The Virgin Suicides Review


Very Good
The Virgin Suicides is a dark comedy that embodies some twisted views on suburban family life and the true lack innocence of adolescence. First-time writer and director Sofia Coppola, daughter of Godfather creator Francis Ford Coppola, proves to us that she's not really an actress (see The Godfather Part III), but that she does have the family knack for provocative movie directing. The movie is based upon Jeffrey Eugenides' novel, The Virgin Suicides, a detective story about five sisters who mysteriously commit suicide and the investigation by four neighborhood boys who had fallen in love with them. Coppola, however, transforms the movie into her own allegory of five adolescent girls who suffer from ruthlessly suppressed lives, their desperate plea for self-expression, and the tragedy that besets their wretched existence.

Set in the mid-seventies, the plot follows the Lisbon family, with James Woods, a physics teacher at the local high school, as the scatter brained father, and Kathleen Turner as the uncommonly strict mother. Their five daughters are beautiful, naturally blonde, and the desire of every boy in the neighborhood. When the youngest, Cecilia, mysteriously attempts suicide, psychiatrist Danny DeVito recommends that she be allowed to interact more socially, especially with boys. So the Lisbon girls are introduced to the boys of the neighborhood, who have already been watching the girls from afar through half-opened window shades, binoculars, and telescopes. At a party in Cecilia's honor, the boys witness a tragedy that shocks them out of their wits. As a result, the Lisbons fall into a deep suppression shutting out the rest of the world by retreating into their own inner sanctum. It appears they will never recover until Trip Fontaine (Josh Hartnett), the high school heartthrob, pursues the unattainable Lux (Kirsten Dunst). He attempts to ask her to the prom, but the only way her mother will allow him to take Lux is if all the girls go together. For the first time, the girls will venture out of the home to interact socially in an environment other than school.

Continue reading: The Virgin Suicides Review

Videodrome Review


Excellent
"It's just murder and torture. No plot. No characters."

That's James Woods describing Videodrome, the pirate TV show his programming exec Max discovers being broadcast, ostensibly from Malaysia. The show features people -- mostly naked women -- being electrocuted, beaten, and eventually killed. That's the show. Woods's Max becomes obsessed with the show, which he quickly discovers is real -- not make-believe. And it's not Malaysian, it's from Pittsburgh. And there's something underneath the regular track... something sinister that ultimately reveals a dark conspiracy.

Continue reading: Videodrome Review

This Girl's Life Review


Good
The girl's life in question is one of a porn star, in case you're wondering.

Newcomer Juliette Marquis is the girl -- with the stage name of Moon -- and the film takes us through a smattering of adventures in her life. She has to pick a guy to star with in a scene (with a geriatric applicant among the choices), she takes care of her father (James Woods), who suffers from Parkinson's, and she decides to start a small business playing femme fatale for women worried their significant others may be tempted to cheat on them.

Continue reading: This Girl's Life Review

John Q Review


Very Good
It's tough to imagine a movie star of Denzel Washington's stature making a credible beleaguered everyman, but Washington does it in John Q. Unlike, say, Cary Grant, who always looked like the sharpest looking dude in Hollywood even when playing "regular guys," Denzel goes out of his way to ugly himself a bit, letting his hair grow a little unruly and adding on some chunky pounds. It's not necessary in a film with as much big movie sheen as this one, but it shows Washington's dedication - a trait that leaps off the screen, commands the movie, and pulls the entire audience in.

Washington, as John Q. Archibald, is today's blueprint, American blue-collar worker. He's an experienced Chicago machinist, a proud guy only able to work part-time hours due to the lack of work. The resulting scant paychecks lead to embarrassing situations, such as the repossession of his car, leaving his wife pissed off and his young son confused. The timing with today's marketplace couldn't be better in gaining the audience's sympathies.

Continue reading: John Q Review

Hercules Review


Good
Tepid Disney animated entry is redeemed by self-referential jokes about merchandising, and James Woods' neat Hades. Probably the beginning of the Disney-mocking-Disney genre of animated films... something which has saved the studio in recent years.

Continue reading: Hercules Review

Pretty Persuasion Review


Excellent
In a time when the collected works of Hilary Duff and Lindsay Lohan have looked like they could suck out whatever feeble life is left in the high school film, along comes a black-hearted piece of nastiness like Pretty Persuasion to remind us that, yes, nothing can simultaneously shock and entertain quite so well as a teenager let loose.

It must be said that things don't begin well, however, with its focus the film's star bitch, 15-year-old Kimberly Joyce (Evan Rachel Wood), who looks to be the queen of her snotty private high school in Beverly Hills. Appearing at first to be the result of some hideous experiment whereby Reese Witherspoon's Election spunk and drive was spliced with the power-lusting evil of at least a couple of the Heathers, Kimberly soon shows herself to be an entirely different sort of villain. In the process of escorting a quiet new Arab student, Randa Azzouni (Adi Schnall), around campus and explaining to her the facts of life and a clinical cost/benefit analysis of the two of them being friends (Randa gets to hang out with one of the school's stars, while Kimberly thinks she looks prettier standing next to Randa), Kimberly drops in this little nugget, "I have respect for all races. But I'm really happy to have been born white." She then proceeds to list, in descending order, the races she would prefer to be, and then patiently explains to Randa - in her flat, rational, almost toneless voice - exactly why Arab would be her last choice ("No offence.").

Continue reading: Pretty Persuasion Review

True Crime Review


Very Good
How'd I miss this one on the big screen? True Crime may have that feel of typical Clint Eastwood-self-promotion, but it is ultimately a considerably gripping meditation on the press and its role in the legal system. While elements feel a bit too much like Dead Man Walking, some excellent performances by Eastwood, Leary, and Woods make this a film worth watching. The story can be tepid and predictable at times, but overall it's a credible stab at crafting a legal thriller.

Night Moves Review


Weak
Hey, I loved Chinatown too. A year after Roman Polanski made his masterpiece, Arthur Penn came along and shat out this dreck in a sad attempt to quickly knock off what made Chinatown great.

We pick up the story with Los Angeles detective Harry Moseby (Gene Hackman), a P.I. who's hired by a wealthy woman to track down her runaway daughter (Melanie Griffith in her first speaking part and already taking off her clothes), who's run off to the Florida Keys. Almost at random, a secondary plot develops, involving a murderous movie stunt coordinator. Meanwhile, Harry's wife is cheating on him, and Harry confronts the guy on at least two different occasions.

Continue reading: Night Moves Review

Riding In Cars With Boys Review


Extraordinary
Chick flicks can be hard to watch. I'll admit it: It was painful to sit through Beaches. Steel Magnolias was a trial. As a man, even as one who prides himself on being fairly sensitive, there's something almost disturbing about watching films that beg for audience waterworks. In short, don't set me up for an emotional episode. If it's going to happen, let it happen; don't lead me down a fiery path to tearjerker destruction.

Riding in Cars with Boys follows the life of Beverly Hasek (Drew Barrymore) as she takes up the difficult role of motherhood at the age of 15, while at the same time, never giving up her dreams. And, while a quintessential chick flick, Riding in Cars chooses to take a higher road -- a genuine road, filled with life lessons so real you can feel them burning their way down your throat and tugging at that little place inside you that says, "Hey, this could have been me!"

Continue reading: Riding In Cars With Boys Review

Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within Review


Very Good
With a team of 200 graphic artists and animators working on this first film production from game developer Squaresoft's Square Pictures, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within, inspired by the top-selling game franchise, is visually awe-inspiring and groundbreaking. No doubt, you have never seen anything like this film, and the hyperbolic fanfare surrounding its release is absolutely deserved. But why does such a tremendous feat of eye candy have to be weighted down with a problematic story, wooden dialogue and generally uncharismatic voice acting?

Obviously, the primary goal of the film is to stun and amaze audiences with extremely sophisticated CGI. Everything you see in the film is rendered in great detail: individual threads in the fabric, strands of hair swaying, wrinkles and pimples on skin, incredible water effects. Overall, the expressions and lip movements fairly accurately match the emotions and dialogue; and the times when they don't sync perfectly really stand out, since the animation is usually so dazzling. But you won't spend much time dwelling on those gaffes -- as soon as you catch one, the next stellar monster or effect will have you muttering, "Wow..."

Continue reading: Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within Review

Northfork Review


OK
Take the style of Terry Gilliam (Brazil, Time Bandits), reduce the budget by several million dollars, and you'll have an idea of what to expect in Northfork. It is magical realism that boasts exceedingly high production values and a plotline that will challenge your state of wakefulness. Can a movie be tedious and fascinating simultaneously? Labored and surprising? Monochromatic yet visually stunning? Let me be the first to say that Northfork is not for everyone. But a movie buff will not want to miss this visionary and difficult bit of inventiveness.

The proposition is that a village, in 1955, sits on a natural basin of land that will be flooded by a new dam. The inhabitants have to move. The upside is that power will be provided for those above the new waterline. The downer is that the last few stragglers don't wanna go but are doomed to do so, like it or not.

Continue reading: Northfork Review

The General's Daughter Review


Good
I really like John Travolta. He always plays that guy with the arrogance and cockiness, but it never seems old to me. In last year's A Civil Action, he played a lawyer who just thought the world of himself. In The General's Daughter, he still gets to play that character, but he has to go new places with it.

The General's Daughter surrounds army cop Paul Brenner (Travolta), and in a James Bond movie type style, he's finishing up another case before the real story even begins. The real story comes into play when a woman is found on a military base staked spread eagle to the ground, naked, and very dead. This isn't just any woman though. She is Captain Elizabeth Campbell, the daughter of famous General Joseph Campbell (James Cromwell). So what really happened? And of course the big question, who did it?

Continue reading: The General's Daughter Review

Pretty Persuasion Review


Terrible

Like some sketch-comedy Frankenstein monster made from the cutting-room entrails of "Clueless," "The Opposite of Sex," "To Die For," "Election" and "Heathers," the puerile social satire "Pretty Persuasion" is stinging only insomuch as its unsophisticated wit and overwhelming smugness are painful to sit through.

Writer Skander Halim and director Marcos Siega clearly watched all these movies before cranking out this disingenuous dark comedy about a manipulative, 15-year-old private-school tart (Evan Rachel Wood) who accuses a teacher (Ron Livingston) of sexual harassment just to get famous. But they didn't learn a thing from those droll, original pictures about sardonic nuance or creating a feeling of camaraderie towards an unsympathetic anti-heroine.

Wood ("Thirteen"), in a rudimentary role far beneath her proven talent, never shies away from the dangerously sharp edges of Beverly Hills brat Kimberly Joyce, who takes down her two best friends (and fellow accusers), an ambitious TV reporter (Jane Krakowski) and her father's business in her pursuit of her 15 minutes. But there's no wicked delight to be had in her machinations, which are so transparently premeditated that all the other characters in the movie (detectives, judges and lawyers included) have to be certifiable morons in order to advance the plot.

Continue reading: Pretty Persuasion Review

The General's Daughter Review


Bad

Only three or four minutes after the lights go down, any credibility "The General's Daughter" might have as a serious drama goes right out the window with the introduction of the title character.

At a retirement party for The General (James Cromwell), a military banquet hall is filled with brass honoring their commander. The camera searches row after row of stern-looking, spit-and-polish men before moving into a close-up of his daughter (Leslie Stefanson), a hot babe of the underwear model variety, smiling a centerfold smile and, except for her uniform, looking for all intents and purposes like she should be jumping out of a cake.

Forgoing the opportunity for a relatively realistic female officer portrayal like Demi Moore in "A Few Good Men," "The General's Daughter" asks us to believe that this porcelain blonde, who looks like she'd cry if she broke a nail, is not only an army captain but a doctor -- a shrink who instructs soldiers in the psychological warfare, no less.

Continue reading: The General's Daughter Review

Riding In Cars With Boys Review


OK

When a movie says it's "based on" a true story, all too often it means that after the script doctors get through with it, what's left is too predictable and packed with clichés to bear any resemblance to the randomness of real life. Such is the case with "Riding In Cars With Boys."

But it just so happens that clichés and predictability are director Penny Marshall specialty. Idle since "A League of Their Own" -- which was totally trite yet thoroughly enjoyable -- Marshall applies her syrupy, low-cal sentimentality to this adapted autobiography of writer Beverly Donofrio, whose youthful ambition was derailed in 1965, by getting knocked up at age 15.

A maudlin but self-deprecating, bittersweet comedy-drama in which major crises are solved with little more than hugs, Beverly's journey through motherhood would be the stuff of a Lifetime Channel movie-of-the-week if not for its gusty sense of humor and a phenomenal performance of extraordinary depth and range by the previously beguiling but frivolous Drew Barrymore.

Continue reading: Riding In Cars With Boys Review

John Q Review


Bad

From its very first scene, "John Q" feels as if it's designed to put a choke leash around your neck so director Nick Cassavetes can give it a good, hard yank whenever he wants you to feel something.

In this opening scene we watch a pretty blonde in a white BMW passing cars on a winding mountain road with a double yellow line. I'm sure I don't have to tell you what's coming, but Cassavetes toys with the viewer, dragging out a couple close calls to make your heart race before -- whammo! Squashed blonde.

What does this have to do with a movie about factory worker Denzel Washington taking over an emergency room at gunpoint to get his dying son a heart transplant? You guessed it -- the girl's an organ donor. But "John Q" doesn't get back to her until 10 minutes before the end of the movie. Cassavetes just puts it at the beginning for shock value.

Continue reading: John Q Review

True Crime Review


Good

As a director, Clint Eastwood has one of the sweetestdeals in Hollywood. He gets to make big budget films with no interferencefrom the suits at Warner Bros., the studio with which he has a relationship.

If Clint wants a long movie, he makes a long movie. IfClint wants to dedicate a whole scene to Clint playing apologetic regret,he dedicates a whole scene to it. As such his movies tend to be self-indulgent,and "True Crime" is definitely self-indulgent.

It's also peppered with glaring "yeah, right!"moments, like the scene in which a 23-year-old Oakland Tribune reportersuccumbs to the considerably aged and pickled Eastwood "charm."

Continue reading: True Crime Review

Stuart Little 2 Review


OK

A significant improvement over its plotless, meandering predecessor, "Stuart Little 2" is fun-loving, low calorie, big-city adventure for the seamlessly computer-animated talking mouse with the effervescent voice of Michael J. Fox.

In this sequel the fuzzy, Lilliputian adopted son of the Little clan -- which includes Stuart's human brother (Jonathan Lipnicki) and his silly, sacchariney, storybook-perfect parents (Hugh Laurie and Geena Davis) -- brings home a spirited sweetheart of a canary named Margalo (Melanie Griffith's voice) after rescuing her from a falcon.

When she later disappears -- along with Mrs. Little's wedding ring -- naive, good-hearted Stuart is convinced the falcon has snatched her away and sets out on a rescue mission, dragging along a very reluctant Snowball, the Littles' pampered house cat with the Vaudevillian voice of Nathan Lane.

Continue reading: Stuart Little 2 Review

James Woods

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James Woods

Date of birth

18th April, 1947

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.80




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James Woods Movies

Jamesy Boy Movie Review

Jamesy Boy Movie Review

While this true prison drama is sharply shot and acted, there isn't a moment we...

White House Down Movie Review

White House Down Movie Review

This may look exactly like Gerard Butler's over-serious Olympus Has Fallen, but it's actually that...

Jobs Trailer

Jobs Trailer

Steve Jobs founded Apple Inc. with his techie pal Steve Wozniak after leaving Reed College...

White House Down Trailer

White House Down Trailer

When USCP officer John Cale is turned down as he applies for a highly coveted...

Jobs Trailer

Jobs Trailer

Steve Jobs is the late founder of Apple Inc. and who was a technological pioneer...

Straw Dogs Movie Review

Straw Dogs Movie Review

This remake of Sam Peckinpah's 1971 British thriller is deeply unpleasant but very well-made. It's...

Straw Dogs Trailer

Straw Dogs Trailer

David and Amy Sumner are a happily married couple who live in L.A., when Amy's...

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Kung Fu Panda 2: The Kaboom of Doom Trailer

Kung Fu Panda 2: The Kaboom of Doom Trailer

What more can come for the Panda who has it all? Since gaining the respect...

An American Carol Movie Review

An American Carol Movie Review

To hear Conservatives tell it, Hollywood is out of touch with the true "America." To...

Surf's Up Movie Review

Surf's Up Movie Review

The passionate pursuit of the perfect wave once inspired Bruce Brown to film the quintessential...

Surf's Up Trailer

Surf's Up Trailer

Surf's Up is an animated comedy that delves behind the scenes of the high-octane world...

The Virgin Suicides Movie Review

The Virgin Suicides Movie Review

The Virgin Suicides is a dark comedy that embodies some twisted views on suburban family...

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