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Jason Flemyng - Jason Flemyng and guest Tuesday 20th March 2012 Wild Bill - UK film premiere held at Cineworld Haymarket - Arrivals.

Jason Flemyng
Dexter Fletcher, Jason Flemyng and Nick Moran
Dexter Fletcher, Jason Flemyng and Nick Moran
Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng

Jason Flemyng and ITV Studios Monday 31st October 2011 at the ITV studios London, England

Jason Flemyng and Itv Studios
Jason Flemyng and Itv Studios
Jason Flemyng and Itv Studios
Jason Flemyng and Itv Studios
Jason Flemyng and Itv Studios

Jason Flemyng and Las Vegas - Wednesday 26th January 2011 at Planet Hollywood Las Vegas, Nevada

Jason Flemyng and Las Vegas
Jason Flemyng and Las Vegas
Jason Flemyng and Las Vegas
Jason Flemyng and Las Vegas
Jason Flemyng and Las Vegas
Jason Flemyng and Las Vegas

Jason Flemyng - Monday 29th March 2010 at Empire Leicester Square London, England

Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng

Clash Of The Titans Trailer


Watch the trailer for Clash Of The Titans.

Continue: Clash Of The Titans Trailer

The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button Review


Essential
Every great filmmaker is allowed one bad film. For David Fincher, his first was his worst.

An intelligent director, Fincher cut his teeth on television commercials and music videos before making his feature debut in 1992 with a forgettable and regrettable installment in the Alien franchise. It was all uphill from there. Fincher's next five films arguably are modern classics, each impressively different from its immediate predecessor. Gen X fanboys idolize him for the basement-dwelling aggressions of Fight Club. The director brought flash -- and a needed backbone -- to pulp thrillers like The Game and Panic Room. And cineastes found plenty to appreciate in the meticulous musings of Fincher's cold-case police procedural, Zodiac.

Continue reading: The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button Review

Jason Flemyng Monday 8th December 2008 The Los Angeles premiere of 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' held at the Mann's Village Theatre - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng

Jason Flemyng Monday 18th February 2008 UK premiere of 'The Bank Job' held at West End Odeon, Leicester Square - Arrivals London, England

Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng

Jason Flemyng - Monday 18th February 2008 at Odeon West End London, England

Jason Flemyng

Jason Flemyng - Jason Flemyng and guests London, England - UK film premiere of 'Stardust' held at the Odeon in Leicester Square Wednesday 3rd October 2007

Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng

Jason Flemyng and Claudia Schiffer London premiere of 'Stardust' afterparty at Claudia Schiffer and Matthew Vaughn's house

Jason Flemyng and Claudia Schiffer
Jason Flemyng and Claudia Schiffer
Jason Flemyng and Claudia Schiffer

Jason Flemyng - Jason Flemyng and guest Hollywood, California - Los Angeles premiere of 'Stardust' held at Paramount Studio Theatre - Arrivals Sunday 29th July 2007

Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng
Jason Flemyng

The Red Violin Review


Excellent
A sprawling epic and a would-be masterpiece, The Red Violin is the story of an ill-fated violin, from the moment it is crafted in 1600s Italy to the day it is sold at auction in millennial Canada. The violin is passed through 1700s Vienna, to an Oxford virtuoso in the 1800s, and on to Mao's China for spell before landing in the lap of Samuel L. Jackson's instrument appraiser. Following the checkered past of such a fateful instrument makes you feel a bizarre sense of connection with it. But ultimately the movie rings a tad hollow -- with contrived plot points and an unbearable and unbelievable finale. But never mind that -- Violin is a grandiose production that should be seen and enjoyed.

Continue reading: The Red Violin Review

Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels Review


Good
Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels has been described as the British Pulp Fiction, and on the surface, that would seem like an accurate depiction. It's got the usual cross-section of characters with witty tongues involved in varied illegal activities, that get themselves into very peculiar situations in which no one really survives unscathed. Nonetheless, the film seems to be missing something that characterized its predecessor. And right now, you're getting the feeling that I'm about to quickly file Lock, Stock as another Tarantino homage/copy-cat crime, but that's not quite it either.

Lock, Stockis in fact, probably the best film since Pulp Fiction in which there are no really good guys. Pulp Fiction, Lock, Stockbegins with what would seem to be a simple story, that quickly careens out of control. In this case, four buddies; Tom, Eddie, Bacon, and Soap, pool their money together to back can't lose Eddie at an unbeknownst-to-them rigged game of cards. Of course they get fleeced, and end up in heavy debt to the local heavy. What follows is a madcap plan to recoup the money by intercepting a heist Eddie has fortuitously discovered his neighbor is carrying out. The interrelation of the problems with the original heist, along with the interception of it by Eddie's gang, and a couple of other local illegal activities result in a frantic circle of destruction.

Continue reading: Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels Review

Mean Machine Review


OK
Paramount Classics is eager to inform you that Mean Machine, a remake of Robert Aldrich's 1974 film The Longest Yard, is from the same people who brought you Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch. Given the expectations this creates, it's no surprise that what's delivered is diverting, fast paced and, of course, violent. In the end Mean Machine is also utterly disposable, but goes down quickly and painlessly. Danny Meehan (Vinnie Jones) is an ex-soccer (football to you Brits) star, who finds himself serving a three-year prison sentence after drunkenly assaulting two policemen. When Meehan arrives at jail, he discovers that the prison governor (David Hemmings) has his mind set on the man taking over coaching duties of the guard soccer team. The plan is undermined by the fact that the guards won't allow a prisoner to be their coach, and several of them explain their feelings to the new celebrity convict in no uncertain terms. A lunchroom scuffle leads Danny to a stay in solitary confinement, where he is presented with an idea by a fellow inmate named Massive (Vas Blackwood): Tell the governor that you are going to build a team of prisoners to square off in a game against the guards. Meehan takes the advice and with the help of Massive and seen-it-all prison veteran Doc (David Kelly), assembles a makeshift squad for the monumental event. But if you thought Meehan's troubles ended there, you are sorely mistaken. He also has to contend in a power struggle with the leader of the inmates, Sykes (John Forgeham), whose authority in the prison outweighs that of the governor. There's also a matter of a notorious incident from Meehan's past when he "threw" an important soccer match in order to pay off a large gambling debt. Meehan braves all of the obstacles and eventually prepares his athletically crude unit, now known as The Mean Machine, a bit too well in the eyes of the governor, who has placed a huge wager (thanks to a tip by the double crossing Sykes) on the team of guards to try and pay off his own debt to a bookie. When the prisoners take a lead in the no-holds-barred match, the governor demands that Meehan revisit his game-throwing tendencies.

Executive Producer Guy Ritchie's influence is more than slightly evident in first time feature director Barry Skolnick's style. You get the requisite mini music videos, a camera which refuses to sit still, shots that don't appear on screen for more than a few seconds (what ever became of the art of composition?), and an abundance of stylized violence tossed in for good measure. Many of Ritchie's regular actors are along for the ride too, such as Jones (who's actually asked to do more than just wear his patented steely glare), Blackwood, Jason Flemyng, and most notably Jason Statham, as martial arts savvy psychopath Monk.

Continue reading: Mean Machine Review

Bruiser Review


Very Good
A revenge fantasy in the E.C. horror comics tradition, George A. Romero's Bruiser is about Henry Creedlow (Jason Flemyng, Snatch), a Joe Average company man whose anonymous working life has made him invisible to peers and loved ones. His wife has been using him for his upwardly mobile financial status while cheating behind his back. His co-worker and best buddy has been skimming the profits, secretly preventing Henry from earning his fair share. Worst of all is the boss, Miles Styles (Peter Stormare, Fargo), a loud, obnoxious boor who enjoys ritualistically humiliating everyone at board meetings -- a character so smirkingly piggish and cruel it's a wonder God hasn't struck him dead. Henry discovers that nice guys finish last, and when he wakes up one morning to discover his face has magically transformed into a featureless white mask, he uses the anonymity once used against him as a device for smooth, calculated vengeance against all who have done him wrong. It's The Invisible Man gone corporate.

Romero hasn't been able to get a feature film off the ground since 1993's The Dark Half, which is really too bad. He's one of the more distinctive filmmakers working within the horror genre, having made his start with the black-and-white classic Night of the Living Dead in 1968. That was a pioneer for modern horror as gruesome satire, followed up by the arguably superior Dawn of the Dead (where the zombie invasion was set against the backdrop of a shopping mall). Fans of Romero will be pleased to see him back to his old preoccupations. Bruiser could be viewed as an extension of the identity crisis in Martin, Romero's ambivalent portrait of a young man who may or may not be a vampire.

Continue reading: Bruiser Review

Deep Rising Review


Bad
Awfully hackneyed and barely entertaining, this Die Hard/Poseidon Adventure/Leviathan knockoff has so little going for it one scarcely knows what to mention in its review. Famke Janssen, always a riot, is even toned-down to blandness as a jewel thief plying her trade on a luxury ship. When Treat Williams and (unbeknownst to him) the band of criminals he is carrying on his speedboat cross paths with the cruise liner, all havoc breaks loose. Whoops -- there's also a monster-from-the-deep to throw a wrench into the works. Explosions, "witty one-liners," and the Williams as the unlikeliest of action heroes make this one yet another throwaway.

The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Review


Bad
If anything, what The League of Extraordinary Gentleman (aka LXG) does best is give us an original concept for action heroes: a group of characters picked from famous literary works united to fight a common enemy. Though it bears a resemblance to X-Men, LXG sounds great, but falls far short. The film, based on Alan Moore's graphic novels, is just a bunch of mindless shootouts and half-baked special effects with little, if any, time spent on the unique individuals at the heart of the action.

In LXG the film, a madman named "The Phantom" is bent on turning the nations of the world against each other in one gigantic World War. It's up to the British government to thwart his plan, and they have assembled a handsome crew to get the job done. Leading the group is aging adventure seeker Allan Quatermain (Sean Connery) with underlings The Invisible Man (Tony Curran), vampiress Mina Harker (Peta Wilson), Dr. Jekyll and alter ego Hyde (Jason Flemyng), Captain Nemo (Naseeruddin Shah), and Tom Sawyer (Shane West). Once all the introductions are done, the group heads to Venice to protect the world's leaders from the Phantom's attack during a peace conference.

Continue reading: The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Review

Snatch Review


Excellent
Madonna's new husband, Guy Ritchie, couldn't have timed his recent marriage any better. Intentional or not, it came a mere week before the opening of his new film Snatch, the follow-up to his Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels. With Madonna as a willing shill, you couldn't ask for better publicity.

Turns out you didn't need it, Guy. Snatch is a film that stands perfectly on its own merits while it shoots bullet holes in everything in sight.

Continue reading: Snatch Review

The Transporter 2 Review


Unbearable

Few bad movies are more aggravating than a sequel that betrays everything which made its predecessor entertaining.

The B-movie, wild-ride brilliance of 2002's "The Transporter" stemmed from the filmmakers (producer-writer Luc Besson, co-writer Robert Mark Kamen and especially director/fight-choreographer Cory Yuen) not letting the plot get in the way of the tongue-in-cheek, out-sized action of incredible car chases and slick kung-fu. The flick embraced its own simplistic silliness -- revolving around a glibly stoic ex-Special Forces operative who makes a living delivering anything, anywhere with no questions asked -- and had a ball doing it.

Star Jason Statham retains his scruffy but well-dressed, bad-ass smirky-cool in "The Transporter 2," but he's continually tripped up by ridiculous, amateur-hour car chases and crashes (on the level of old "CHiPs" episodes), by over-choreographed fight scenes (so badly shot and edited that all you can comprehend is motion), and by the insultingly half-baked machinations of a convoluted screenplay.

Continue reading: The Transporter 2 Review

Layer Cake Review


Good
A stylish, dynamic thicket of thorny underworld twistsand deceptions, "Layer Cake" stars Daniel Craig ("Roadto Perdition," "EnduringLove") in a charismatically dodgy performanceas "a businessman whose commodity happens to be cocaine."

Beginning with a voice-over that provides cheeky insightinto the savvy it takes to stay ahead in Britain's organized-crime drugtrade, he sets the stage for a story full of unexpected sharp edges thatmake it increasingly unlikely his character will ever reach his statedgoal of early retirement.

"You know why people like you can't leave this business?You make too much money for people like me," says Craig's boss (KennethCranham), an uncouth kingpin who puts on country-club airs as he intimidatesour anonymous hero (whose name is never mentioned) into a job way out ofhis depth -- hunting down an associate's sexy, strung-out missing daughter.

But the girl is barely a jumping-off point for the stimulatinglybyzantine plot of "Layer Cake," in which one stupid mistake byan irresponsibly flashy small-time associate who calls himself "TheDuke" (Jamie Foreman) begins a domino effect of revelations, double-crosses,paybacks and bursts of violence -- all of which come tumbling down on Craig'shead.

Continue reading: Layer Cake Review

The Red Violin Review


Excellent

Like a blending of great symphony and great cinema, "The Red Violin" is a magnum opus of musical-visual composition for French-Canadian director Francois Girard ("Thirty-Two Short Films About Glenn Gould").

The biography of a masterpiece musical instrument and its globetrotting passage through centuries of owners, this is a film overflowing with fervent movements of pathos, seductive tempos of passion, tragic refrains of sorrow and a riveting, recurring chorus that ties every measure beautifully together.

The resourcefully framed story of a violin set adrift in time begins in modern Montreal where the tattered yet still magnificent instrument is being sold at auction, with emotional bids ardently exchanged by several interested parties.

Continue reading: The Red Violin Review

Rock Star Review


OK

Mark Wahlberg couldn't be more perfect for the role of Chris Cole, "Rock Star's" head-bangin' hair band wannabe whose singular ambition in life is to be e-x-a-c-t-l-y like the shirtless, leather-clad, pelvis-thrusting, high note-shrieking lead singer of the heavy metal band Steel Dragon.

He looks absolutely vintage, sporting metalhead tresses and screwing up his face in imitation sneers. He revels in Cole's absurdly passionate perfectionism in fronting a Steel Dragon "tribute band" and embraces Cole's humorously inconsequential real life as an on-call Xerox technician who still lives with his parents.

He belts out the tunes of the fictitious Steel Dragon with amazing range and the earnestness of an insanely zealous fan -- so much so that while in the front row at a Steel Dragon concert he rather unnerves his hero by loudly singing along with more gusto than the man himself can muster.

Continue reading: Rock Star Review

The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Review


Bad

Adapted from a comic book chock full of literary allusions but summer-movie-ized for the Cliff's Notes set, "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" is predictably packed with flash and completely devoid of life.

A turn-of-the-20th-century action flick that tries to evoke an antediluvian "Batman"-ish atmosphere with dark, overzealous production design, this convoluted dud stars Sean Connery as famous fictional British explorer-adventurer Allan Quartermain, who is persuaded to recruit a cadre of period legends to help bring down a terrorist organization bent on starting a world war.

The team consists of Jules Verne's submariner Captain Nemo (Naseeruddin Shah), H.G. Wells' Invisible Man (Tony Curran), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Jason Flemyng), "Dracula" vampiress Mina Harker (Peta Wilson), Oscar Wilde's portrait-dependent immortal Dorian Gray (Stuart Townsend) and a yee-haw Secret Service agent named Tom Sawyer (Shane West) -- yes, that Tom Sawyer -- who was shoe-horned into the script to Americanize the story for U.S. audiences.

Continue reading: The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Review

From Hell Review


OK

A vivid yet distinctly fictitious recreation of the crime-plagued gutters of 19th Century London, the Jack the Ripper thriller "From Hell" is quite a homage to the dense graphic novel from which it was spawned.

It's nothing if not atmospheric, what with its opulently dingy, blood-red set dressings, its pinched-cheek and cheap-corset prostitutes, and its opium- and absinthe-addicted hero -- an unorthodox Scotland Yard Inspector named Abberline (Johnny Depp in lambchop sideburns) who discovers dangerous secrets in the Ripper's ritualized killings.

The film's talented directors -- brothers Allen and Albert Hughes ("Menace II Society," "Dead Presidents"), definitively demonstrating there's more to them than ghetto fare -- blend quite a transporting concoction with their viscous visuals, menacing moodiness, puzzling plot and heady performances.

Continue reading: From Hell Review

Below Review


Good

Already packed solid with all the claustrophobic wartime tension a good submarine thriller needs, "Below" squeezes in something more -- a startling, bone-chilling element of the supernatural.

Set onboard an American sub called the USS Tiger Shark, cruising the Atlantic during World War II, the tightly drawn story begins with the boat doubling back on its planned course under orders to rescue the only three survivors of a torpedoed British hospital ship -- a crewman, a badly burned patient and a nurse (Olivia Williams), who causes consternation among the crew. She's pretty, sure. But more importantly, maritime superstition holds that women are bad luck on a submarine.

Director David Twohy ("Pitch Black") wastes no time in building seat-gripping suspense. The Tiger Shark's sonar officer picks up an unknown contact just as the sub is surfacing amongst the sunken steamer's debris, so the rescue becomes a palpably perilous race against time. The scene is nerve-wracking, thanks in no small part to Twohy's touches of tense creativity (all the dread he needs is found in a single shot looking back at the captain's eye from inside the periscope) and a potently unsettling, untraditionally military score by Graeme Revell ("Pitch Black," "Blow," "Tomb Raider").

Continue reading: Below Review

Snatch Review


Good

"I was a happy boxing promoter until about a week ago, and then -- what do I know about diamonds?"

What a great opening line for a plan-gone-awry crime caper comedy.

The picture is "Snatch," a fast-paced, multi-track corker with a nebulous English sense of humor, and the line is spoken by Turkish (Jason Statham), a small-time London tough who sees an opportunity to be something more but never imagines the trouble it will get him into.

Continue reading: Snatch Review

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Jason Flemyng Movies

Gemma Bovery Trailer

Gemma Bovery Trailer

Martin Joubert is a French baker living in Normandy who has a deep passion for...

Stonehearst Asylum Movie Review

Stonehearst Asylum Movie Review

An arch approach makes this bonkers thriller rather enjoyable, even if it never quite cracks...

Stonehearst Asylum Trailer

Stonehearst Asylum Trailer

Stonehearst Asylum follows the plot of Edgar Allen Poe's short story The System of Doctor...

I Give It a Year Movie Review

I Give It a Year Movie Review

Not so much a rom-com as an anti-romance comedy, this brightly amusing British film makes...

Great Expectations Movie Review

Great Expectations Movie Review

Even though Charles Dickens' oft-told story is livened up with a terrific cast and sharp...

I Give It A Year Trailer

I Give It A Year Trailer

Josh and Nat thought they had the most perfect relationship and made no hesitation in...

Great Expectations Trailer

Great Expectations Trailer

Pip is a young orphan who has a chance meeting with a frightening stranger while...

Wild Bill Trailer

Wild Bill Trailer

Bill, known to his friends as Wild Bill, has just been imprisoned for eight years...

X-Men First Class Trailer

X-Men First Class Trailer

It's 1962 and the world is on the brink of starting a new world war....

X-men: First Class Movie Review

X-men: First Class Movie Review

Matthew Vaughn kicks some life back into the X-men franchise with this superbly written, directed...

Hanna Movie Review

Hanna Movie Review

Pacey and offbeat, this cat-and-mouse film keeps us on our toes by layering the action...

Ironclad Movie Review

Ironclad Movie Review

Turning a rarely dramatised chapter of British history into a riotously grisly romp, this film...

Kick-Ass Movie Review

Kick-Ass Movie Review

The team behind Stardust brings us the superhero movie we always wanted: brazen, raucous and...

Clash Of The Titans Movie Review

Clash Of The Titans Movie Review

The studio clearly couldn't resist the chance to digitally revisit the creatures so memorably animated...

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