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Jason Lee

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Jason Lee - OK! Magazine's pre-Grammy event with a performance by Jason Derulo and special guest appearance by Jordin Sparks at Lure Nightclub - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 24th January 2014

Jason Lee
Jason Lee

Jason Lee and Yvonne Lee - Geffen Playhouse's annual fundraiser honoring Bruce Ramer and Billy Crystal held at Geffen Playhouse - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 13th May 2013

Jason Lee and Yvonne Lee
Jason Lee and Yvonne Lee

Jason Lee, Ceren Alkac, Sonny and Casper - Jason Lee, wife Ceren Alkac, son Sonny, daughter Casper Saturday 10th November 2012 Los Angeles premiere of Disney Channel's 'Sofia The First: Once Upon a Princess' at The Walt Disney Studios - Arrivals

Jason Lee, Ceren Alkac, Sonny and Casper
Jason Lee

Jason Lee and ken block - Jason Lee and Ken Block Tuesday 10th April 2012 Screening of 'Waiting For Lightning' held at the ArcLight Cinerama Dome

Jason Lee and Ken Block
Jason Lee and Ken Block
Jason Lee and Ken Block
Jason Lee
Jason Lee
Jason Lee

Jason Lee and El Rey Theatre Monday 26th March 2012 The Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment's Alvin And The Chipmunks: Chipwrecked Blu-ray and DVD Release Party held at the El Rey Theatre

Jason Lee and El Rey Theatre
Jason Lee, Lee Ross and El Rey Theatre
Jason Lee, Lee Ross and El Rey Theatre
Jason Lee, Lee Ross and El Rey Theatre
Jason Lee and El Rey Theatre
Jason Lee and El Rey Theatre

Jason Lee FayesVision/"2#115#Source="

Jason Lee

Jason Lee - Jason Lee and family Los Angeles, California - The premiere of Walt Disney Pictures' 'The Muppets' at the El Capitan Theatre - Arrivals Saturday 12th November 2011

Jason Lee
Jason Lee

Jason Lee Sunday 18th September 2011 15th Annual Entertainment Tonight Emmy Party Presented By Visit California at Vibiana - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Jason Lee

Jason Lee Monday 1st August 2011 Kiehl's 2nd annual 'LifeRide for amfAR' charitable motorcycle ride, making five stops along the East Coast to raise funds for AIDS research Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Jason Lee
Jason Lee
Jason Lee
Jason Lee
Jason Lee, Tricia Helfer and Tyson Beckford
Jason Lee

Jason Lee and Abc Studios Thursday 9th June 2011 leaving ABC studios after appearing no the 'Live with Regis and Kelly' show

Jason Lee and Abc Studios
Jason Lee and Abc Studios
Jason Lee and Abc Studios
Jason Lee and Abc Studios
Jason Lee and Abc Studios
Jason Lee and Abc Studios

Cop Out Trailer


Watch the trailer for Cop Out

Continue: Cop Out Trailer

Underdog Review


Bad
Someone needs to send an exorcist over to the Disney Studios, PDQ. The House of Mouse needs a ghostbuster to purge its demonic tendencies toward remaking classic cartoons and other 2D animated properties into shoddy live action spectacles. First there was George of the Jungle and Inspector Gadget. Now the glorified product pitchman Underdog falls under the reinterpretation light. Originally conceived by General Mills' ad agency (and its head, W. Watts Biggers) as a way of selling cereal to wee ones, the once noble anthropomorphic pup with the Superman-like powers has been reduced to a post-modern joke where everything's ironic and nothing's endearing.

After he messes up an important training test, failed police dog Shoeshine (with the voice of actor Jason Lee) winds up in the lab of Dr. Simon Barsinister (a perfectly cast Peter Dinklage) and his dopey assistant Cad (a totally out of whack Patrick Warburton). A genetic engineering experiment goes haywire, turning our hound into a hero, and our scientist into a psychopath. On the run, Shoeshine winds up with young Jack Unger (the vacant Alex Neuberger). While he tries to hide his special talents -- especially his ability to talk -- Shoeshine relents, and quickly becomes pals with his new owner. As he settles in for a life of chasing his tail, scratches fleas, and fighting crime, Barsinister will not let such a supremely successful example of his research slip away. He plots to kidnap and capitalize on the newly named Underdog, destroying anyone who intends to stop him.

Continue reading: Underdog Review

Alvin And The Chipmunks Review


Terrible
In theory, it's a good idea for a family film. Take Dave Seville's (aka songwriter Ross Bagdasarian Sr.) loveable novelty act, those swell, squeaky voiced woodland creatures, and marry them to the post-modern world of CGI. Toss in a recognizable name (in this case, My Name is Earl's Jason Lee) in the human role, ratchet up the current pop culture references (lots of video game nods and hip-hop rodent rump-shakin') and, hypothetically, you've got a no miss holiday treat.

So where, exactly, did the makers of the nauseating Alvin and the Chipmunks go wrong? How did something that seemed like a slam dunk turn into one of the biggest piles of 2007 junk? Maybe it's the lack of cleverness? A myriad of missed opportunities? The blatant stupidity of the entire narrative? You'd think that Jon Vitti (ex-Simpsons scribe), Will McRobb and Chris Viscardi (both of Pete and Pete fame) could come up with something fresher, more original, than this rabid rags-to-riches tale. Even worse, director Tim Hill (Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties) offers no situational context to make the otherwise surreal circumstances crackle with comic possibilities.

Continue reading: Alvin And The Chipmunks Review

Stealing Harvard Review


Bad
Toward the end of Stealing Harvard, Tom Green's character goes to great lengths trying to break a Plexiglas window from inside the store he is trying to rob. It took the entire movie, but I could finally identify with his character. It wasn't because I have a tendency for thievery, instead I found it my only chance to escape the entrapment of this dismal movie - naturally he can't get the window to bust.

Stealing Harvard centers on the sensible, hardworking John (Jason Lee) who made a promise long ago that he would pay for his niece Noreen's (Tammy Blanchard) college education. At the time, John thought Noreen would never amount to much, considering she is the daughter of his trailer trash sister Patty (Megan Mullally, in the film's best, but neglected, role). Much to John's chagrin, Noreen gets accepted to Harvard and now he must make good on his word to pay for her first year of schooling. John already has the cash he needs, but he has promised this money to his fiancée Elaine (Leslie Mann) for use as a down payment on their dream home. Sounds like John is making too many promises.

Continue reading: Stealing Harvard Review

Dogma Review


Good
That's it. Kevin Smith is going to Hell. Big Hell, with a capital H.

In Dogma, Smith's long-awaited and already vilified indictment of the Catholic church, the auteur has gone to great lengths to show us he can take on any establishment and gut it wide open. To wit:

Continue reading: Dogma Review

Kissing A Fool Review


Weak
Droll and patently unbelievable, Kissing a Fool invites you to believe that David Schwimmer is a sports buff and, ya know, a real ladies' man. If you find Schwimmer the sexy type, Fool will be right up your alley. If, like the rest of us, you think lil' Dave is a geek -- and you find the "I'm testing my fiancee to see if she'll cheat on me" plot to be distasteful -- then you may want to pass. A few moments of watchability (and the pleasingly pretty Avital) punctuated by flat jokes a movie do not make.

The Incredibles Review


Essential
Fall brings us another Pixar film, a cinematic event that's become as predictable as it is highly anticipated.

The Incredibles marks a departure from G-rated fare for Pixar, and it's also the studio's first shot at creating an all-"human" cast. There's nary a talking fish, insect, toy, or monster to be found in The Incredibles; these stars are all people with real problems and familiar personalities. This little switch has the surprising effect of making us care far more about its heroes than ever before. You could have served up Nemo as sushi for all I care -- he's a freakin' fish! Mr. Incredible's got a wife, kids, and a mortgage, and his boss is a jerk. Toddlers may prefer a surfing turtle, but the rest of us are going to find The Incredibles Pixar's best film yet.

Continue reading: The Incredibles Review

Chasing Amy Review


Excellent
The intro sequence of Chasing Amy, comic book frames of oddly familiar characters, informs us immediately that we are entering the world of Kevin Smith. That world is one over-populated with comic book fanatics, philosophical drug dealers, and ambitionless twenty-somethings. To Smith, the film's director, that world is New Jersey.

Like characters found in other recent Gen X movies, Smith's heroes are unjustifiably hip. Chasing Amy there are two groups of characters, Jersey boys afraid of the city, and fixtures of the NYC underground. But regardless of background, every character in Chasing Amy is poised with a witty remark or comical/philosophical riff on love or life. Smith even highlights the (self)-importance of his protagonist, played by Ben Affleck, by unabashedly naming him after the coolest literary character of the twentieth century, Holden Caulfield.

Continue reading: Chasing Amy Review

Heartbreakers Review


Very Good
The problem with a movie like Heartbreakers is that as hard as you try to concentrate on the notable qualities of the film -- the clever camerawork, the strong ensemble acting, the deft script -- every time Jennifer Love Hewitt walks into a scene, her breasts take over. Even my date noticed the blatant attempts by the filmmakers in drawing all attention to the chests of both Sigourney Weaver and Hewitt. Alas, all those breasts are never fully revealed -- like some bad '80s teen horror film censored by Jerry Falwell.

Despite the massive amounts of boob time in Heartbreakers, the film delivers all the goods of a solid comedic vehicle. Max (Weaver) and Page (Hewitt) are a mother/daughter team who swindle rich guys out of their dollars in a con involving matrimony vows, extramarital trysts, and divorce settlements. Sort of like a cross between Anywhere but Here and The Grifters. With the IRS hot on their proverbial tails, the duo team up for one last job, bilking cigarette tycoon William B. Tensy (Gene Hackman) out of his cash. Alas, during the con job, Page ends up falling in love with a local bar owner (Jason Lee), a dead body ends up in their trunk, Princess Leia shows up as a divorce attorney, and a jilted ex-husband (Ray Liotta) shows up waving a gun and advising group therapy for everyone.

Continue reading: Heartbreakers Review

Almost Famous Review


Excellent
When you enter into the world of entertainment journalism, you think it's the coolest thing in the world. Suddenly, doors are opened for you. You can get into movies free, or get books free, or get music free. You can meet directors or movie stars, see rock gods face to face, and get to ask Kurt Vonnegut that question that has burned in your gut for years. For some odd reason, people call you names. They call you evil and the enemy, but you really don't care. You just are thrilled to be there, be part of this intangible "it" known as celebrity.

And then it happens.

Continue reading: Almost Famous Review

Mallrats Review


OK
Well, the long-awaited Mallrats is here at last, and sadly, the perfect twentysomething romantic comedy has still yet to be made. Writer/director Kevin Smith follows up his hilarious first film, Clerks, with this, the second in his so-called New Jersey Trilogy. It's second not only in sequence, but a distant also-ran in quality, too.

Mallrats tells the story of two mostly-losers, T.S. (Jeremy London) and Brodie (Jason Lee), who manage to lose and regain their respective girlfriends, Brandi (Claire Forlani) and Rene (Shannen Doherty), in one long day at the mall. Along the way, the pair has a series of big adventures with cops and security guards, a game show organized by Brandi's dad (Michael Rooker), comic book creator Stan Lee, and the returning characters of Jay (Jason Mewes) and Silent Bob (Smith himself). Where all this was supposed to go, I'm not too sure. But I think it was supposed to be about relationships, and I think it was supposed to be funny.

Continue reading: Mallrats Review

Jay And Silent Bob Strike Back Review


OK
It's time to say "goodbye," according to Kevin Smith, to his token recurring characters -- the C3PO and R2-D2 of the local Quick Stop -- Jay (Jason Mewes) and Silent Bob (Kevin Smith). Since their inception as two stoner losers hanging out in front of the local Quick Stop "smokin' blunts and kickin' asses" in Clerks, Jay and Silent Bob have received ever expanding roles in Smith's later features -- Mallrats, Chasing Amy, and Dogma. But when these two guys showed up in a cameo in Scream 3, that was the moment when they "jumped the shark" (aka lost their unique appeal and devolved into would-be Happy Meal figurines). I wouldn't be surprised if two 10-foot tall character replicants greeted all guests at Miramax's HQ.

If you looking for a plot in Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, don't bother. Smith uses the safe convention of repetition by including certain key locations of his first three films and all of their main characters -- minus Dogma. By doing this, Smith creates a familiar universe for Jay and Silent Bob to venture through and trick the audience into remembering their old favorites and ignore the throwaway script.

Continue reading: Jay And Silent Bob Strike Back Review

Dreamcatcher Review


Weak
Lawrence Kasdan's Dreamcatcher begins with intriguing promise -- a series of icy cool, shape-shifting visuals make for an eerie credits sequence. Enjoy it while you can, because it's downhill from there in this Stephen King-based thriller. It does take a little while for Kasdan's adaptation to completely fall apart, so there are some decent shakes and scares along the way -- but nowhere near enough to make for a satisfying moviegoing experience.

The story is classic King territory. Four kids stick together like glue in Derry, New Hampshire (Stand By Me), grow up to be adults with their own demons (It), become hindered by snow (The Shining) during a hunting trip, and end up face-to-face with a higher supernatural power (The Stand). In this case, the four men have their own dangerous mental strength as a result of their lifelong friendship with Douglas "Duddits" Cavell (Donnie Wahlberg), a mentally retarded man with overpowering gifts.

Continue reading: Dreamcatcher Review

The Ballad Of Jack & Rose Review


Weak
"The Ballad of Jack and Rose" concerns several strange characterswho just scream for something strange and unusual to say. But writer/directorRebecca Miller, daughter of playwright Arthur Miller, only gives them themost ordinary, mundane movie dialogue imaginable.

Miller sets her story, about an ailing father (Daniel Day-Lewis)and his teenage daughter (Camilla Belle), in and around an abandoned 1970shippie commune.

Father Jack and daughter Rose have lived an isolated life,farming and building tree forts, and have turned out rather odd.

Jack ordinarily spends a good deal of time railing againstan evil housing developer (Beau Bridges) who is looking to spoil the island.But for a change of pace, he impulsively invites his secret lover, Kathleen(Catherine Keener), and her two sons, chunky Rodney (Ryan McDonald) andthuggish Thaddius (Paul Dano) to move in. Although this new trio has notbeen raised in a commune, they're just as troubled as Jack and Rose, andtalk just as blandly.

Continue reading: The Ballad Of Jack & Rose Review

Almost Famous Review


Good

Writer-director Cameron Crowe's fond fictionalization of his first assignmentfor Rolling Stone -- as a 15-year-old cub reporter in 1973 -- "Almost Famous" is a vividly realized labor of love and an absolute pleasure to watch.

Having gestated in Crowe's fertile mind since before "SayAnything," his 1989 directorial debut, it's a born crowd-pleaser honedinto an entertaining cinematic paragon of rock 'n' roll that boasts sharpperformances from a sublime cast, speaking page after page of Crowe's uniquebrand of intrinsically quotable, yet seemingly true-to-life dialogue.

A winning young actor named PatrickFugit -- who prior to being cast had only twoepisodes of "Touched By An Angel" on his resume -- carries themovie as William Miller, the director's mop-topped alter-ego. Like Crowehimself, William gets his start as a rock journalist by being taken underthe wing of Lester Bangs (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a jaded but passionatemusic reporter for the fanzine Creem.

Continue reading: Almost Famous Review

Big Trouble Review


OK

How apropos it seems that the enjoyably outrageous screwball satire "Big Trouble" should open a little more than a week after the death of Billy Wilder, whose influence is felt all over this picture's breakneck comedic pacing.

Reminiscent, if mostly in spirit, of Wilder's lesser-known "One, Two, Three" -- a fast-paced side-splitter starring James Cagney as an American business man who stumbles into Iron Curtain intrigue in 1961 Berlin -- "Big Trouble" features Tim Allen as a fired, freshly divorced newspaper columnist who narrates a lunatic tale of arms trading and assassination attempts in modern Miami.

As one of a dozen characters with equal screen time, Allen's connection to the plot is almost peripheral, but he gives great voice-over (from the zany Dave Barry book on which the film is based) that helps keep straight the cavalcade of well-cast kooks to come.

Continue reading: Big Trouble Review

The Incredibles Review


OK

Far less funny and considerably more violent than audiences have come to expect from Pixar movies, "The Incredibles" is the animation studio's first feature to lack the winsome pizzazz that makes for mandatory repeat viewing.

Created by Brad Bird, the writer-director of "The Iron Giant," one of the greatest animated movies of all time, the story revolves around a family of far too sincerely glum superheroes trying hard to live normal suburban lives at a time when frivolous lawsuits have made saving the world cost-prohibitive.

But out of their spandex, they're just a bunch of sitcom clichés. Bob Parr (secretly super-strong do-gooder Mr. Incredible, voiced with idealistic comic-book resonance by Craig T. Nelson) is an irresponsible dad who tries to keep secrets and stupid mistakes from his (literally) stretched-in-every direction wife, Helen (a.k.a. Elastigirl, voiced with adoring irony by Holly Hunter). Their kids are, of course, a hyperactive 8-year-old named Dash (Spencer Fox), who can run 100 mph, and mopey teenage Violet (NPR radio's droll Sarah Vowell), blessed with a gift many junior high girls would kill for -- invisibility.

Continue reading: The Incredibles Review

Mumford Review


Good

"Mumford" is a weightless comedy with old-fashioned appeal, the kind of innocuous, affable picture in which happiness is just a musical montage sequence away.

Fifty years ago, it might have been a Jimmy Stewart movie, with a few subject matter alterations. Twenty-five years ago, Dustin Hoffman could have been the lead. In 1999 though, the title role goes to Loren Dean ("Gattaca"), who plays a warmhearted con man winging it as a psychologist in a small mountain town, where his unconventional therapy methods turn around the distressed lives for a smattering of eccentric residents.

Handsome, open and amiable, he's been in town only four months and already he's everyone's friend. He's just the kind of guy strangers tell their problems to, which is why he decided to give it a go in the head shrinking game.

Continue reading: Mumford Review

A Guy Thing Review


Weak

Jason Lee is usually the funniest guy in any Kevin Smith movie (Banky in "Chasing Amy," Azrael in "Dogma"). Julia Stiles has had fine comedic timing ever since her big splash in "10 Things I Hate About You." But they couldn't be more mismatched as romantic leads in "A Guy Thing."

A cold-feet comedy of accumulative misunderstandings about a groom-to-be who wakes up with a blonde in his bed the morning after his bachelor party -- and assumes the worst -- the movie spends most of its time mining very familiar territory. Lee hides the girl's forgotten panties, discovers she's his fiancée's cousin, and has generic nightmare run-ins with his future in-law and Stiles' ex-boyfriend.

Most of its jokes come from the compounding lies that make it hard to sympathize with the hero, and the moment you meet each one-trait character, you can see his or her entire story arc mapped out in front of you. Example: Stifled Lee, who's going to veer from his buttoned-up, conservative bride-to-be (Selma Blair) and fall in love with wild-child Stiles, has a buttoned-up, conservative brother (Thomas Lennon) who is secretly in love with Blair. Hmmm...I can't imagine where that's going.

Continue reading: A Guy Thing Review

Dogma Review


Good

Thanks to all the is-it-or-isn't-it-blasphemy controversy surrounding "Dogma," writer-director Kevin Smith has added a tongue-in-cheek disclaimer to the opening of this renegade ribbing of the Catholic church that is so amusing ("...God has a sense of humor, just look at the platypus") it will have audiences in stitches even before the first line of dialogue.

Whether or not you'll think the movie stays this funny will depend on how sensitive you are about your position on the religious yardstick, your threshold for soapbox pontification and what it takes to gross you out.

Smith, the maverick Generation X satirist responsible for ragtag underground hits "Clerks" and "Chasing Amy," makes no bones about testing the limits of irreverence and good taste in this ironically snappy and smart-mouthed theological deliberation.

Continue reading: Dogma Review

Jason Lee

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Jason Lee

Date of birth

25th April, 1970

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.87


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Jason Lee Movies

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip Trailer

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip Trailer

Having literally gone from rags to riches, Alvin, Simon and Theodore didn't think their lives...

Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Road Chip Trailer

Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Road Chip Trailer

Alvin, Simon and Theodore are preparing to embark on more mischievous adventures; venturing out on...

Behaving Badly Movie Review

Behaving Badly Movie Review

For a comedy that so desperately wants to be rude and sexy, this movie is...

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Alvin And The Chipmunks: Chipwrecked Movie Review

Alvin And The Chipmunks: Chipwrecked Movie Review

It's impossible to be critical of a movie like this, since it's not trying to...

Cop Out Movie Review

Cop Out Movie Review

Trying to make up for a lack of genuine wit, this film adopts a frenetic...

Cop Out Trailer

Cop Out Trailer

Watch the trailer for Cop Out Veteran detective Jimmy Monroe and his partner Paul Hodges...

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Alvin And The Chipmunks Movie Review

Alvin And The Chipmunks Movie Review

In theory, it's a good idea for a family film. Take Dave Seville's (aka songwriter...

Monster House Movie Review

Monster House Movie Review

Every perfect and picturesque neighborhood - at least in the movies - has one: that...

Stealing Harvard Movie Review

Stealing Harvard Movie Review

Toward the end of Stealing Harvard, Tom Green's character goes to great lengths trying to...

Mumford Movie Review

Mumford Movie Review

Mumford reminded me how nice it is to forget yourself in the midst of a...

Vanilla Sky Movie Review

Vanilla Sky Movie Review

The single best scene in Vanilla Sky, and maybe in the entire year of cinema,...

Dogma Movie Review

Dogma Movie Review

That's it. Kevin Smith is going to Hell. Big Hell, with a capital...

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