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Jean Smart - Premiere screening of FX's 'Fargo' at the ArcLight Cinemas Hollywood - Arrivals at ArcLight Cinemas - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 7th October 2015

Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Michael Hogan and Jean Smart
Michael Hogan and Jean Smart
Michael Hogan and Jean Smart

Jean Smart - Premiere of FX's 'Fargo' held at the ArcLight Cinemas Hollywood at Arclight Cinemas Hollywood, ArcLight Cinemas - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 8th October 2015

Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart

Jean Smart - The National Breast Cancer Coalition Fund Presents The 13th Annual Les Girls Held at Avalon - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 8th October 2013

Jean Smart
Jean Smart and Ana Ortiz
Jean Smart, Ana Ortiz and Deborah May
Jean Smart and Ana Ortiz
Jean Smart
Jean Smart, Ana Ortiz and Deborah May

Jean Smart - Jean Smart, Wednesday 27th July 2011 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Los Angeles, California

Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart

Guests and Jean Smart Friday 3rd December 2010 GLAAD Celebrates 25 Years of LGBT Images in the media held at The Harmony Gold Theatre West Hollywood, California

Guests and Jean Smart
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Jean Smart
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Jean Smart

Jean Smart Los Angeles Premiere of Youth In Revolt held at Mann's Chinese 6 Theater Hollywood, California

Jean Smart

Jean Smart - Sunday 21st September 2008 at Emmy Awards Los Angeles, California

Jean Smart

Jean Smart Saturday 12th May 2007 Viewpoint School Fundraiser - Arrivals held at the Beverly Hilton California, USA

Jean Smart

Garden State Review


Excellent
Even before he finds out his mother has died, Andrew Largeman (Zach Braff) is depressed -- that much we can tell. His medicine cabinet is stocked with seemingly infinite amounts of antidepressants, which seem to mute his depression without addressing it. Although we are told he is an actor who has just finished a high-profile TV part (playing, as several characters recognize, "the retarded quarterback"), it's hard to picture him coming alive in his work; he barely says a word.

Garden State, an auspicious writing and directing debut from Braff (of TV's charming Scrubs), is about Largeman's return to his New Jersey hometown, and like Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation, it's more about mood and moments than telling a single story (and like that film, it's about an actor feeling numb to the "real" world). Indeed, the plot feels very much out of short fiction -- and, we can't help but notice, possible autobiography; Braff is a young actor from Jersey, too.

Continue reading: Garden State Review

Guinevere Review


Very Good
A curious May-December romance involving a bohemian San Francisco photographer (Rea) who builds a kind of teacher-lover-father-figure relationship with the far-younger Harper (Polley), whom he dubs Guinevere. Think of it as The Professional without all the killing. Turns out our shutterbug has a history of Guineveres, and soon his teeth are falling out and he's dying, and suffice it to say this is where the movie turns bizarre. Poetic, if not altogether meaningful. Jean Smart is particularly apt as Harper's prissy and snobbish mother.

The Brady Bunch Movie Review


Excellent
Did I grow up Brady? Did I! One of the first of the 1970s TV series to get the big-screen treatment, The Brady Bunch Movie remains virtually the only successful film from that genre -- one that studios continue to experiment in with disastrous results. (Full disclosure: We here at filmcritic.com are rabidly fanatical for Josie and the Pussycats.)

But Brady -- the movie -- does everything right, balancing faithfulness with the original film with rib-jabbing at its family-friendly kitsch. The catch: The Bradys are updated to the 1990s, but they haven't changed a bit. The plot itself -- about a plan to put a mini-mall in place of the Brady block -- is a throwaway. It's just an excuse to set us up with endless Brady antics, from Cindy's tattling to Peter's voice changing, to Johnny Bravo. If all this means something to you, the film will be nothing short of hilarious. If it's meaningless to you, just look at what you missed!

Continue reading: The Brady Bunch Movie Review

Bringing Down The House Review


Very Good
More than a decade after Steve Martin lost control of his own home in Housesitter, another of his patented Poor Sap characters is in similar trouble. This time, instead of a spunky, conniving Goldie Hawn acting as unwanted tenant, a sassy, street-smart, badass Queen Latifah is movin' on up. Thankfully, Martin and Latifah make for a good high-concept Hollywood odd couple that keeps all races and ages laughing, in director Adam Shankman's speedy, funky -- and politically incorrect -- comedy.

Martin, in a plain, white guy role that's getting a bit tired, is tax attorney Peter Sanderson. He's got a fairly palatial suburban home, an ex-wife, two kids... and a chat room buddy named "lawyergirl." Peter quickly learns that making friends on the Internet can be a bitch -- his dream girl ends up being an ex-con named Charlene (Latifah), a sly loudmouth who's served time for armed robbery. Through some not-so-gentle blackmail, Charlene enlists Peter's legal aid and moves into his house and life.

Continue reading: Bringing Down The House Review

Snow Day Review


Very Good
It's tough for a Texas boy to relate to the concept of a snow day. We had the occasional sleet day or hurricane day, sure, but snow? Whether you live in the tundra or not, I'm sure everyone can relate to the real story of Snow Day, the tale of a boy who pines for the school beauty, a girl far above his station with whom he never has a shot.

Maybe we can relate a little too well. This story has literally been done to death (it feels practically like a remake of 1995's Angus), but at least Snow Day is reasonably funny along the way. Thanks to the movie's "fresh new stars," Snow Day feels newer than it should. And thanks to leading kids Mark Webber (Drive Me Crazy) and Schuyler Fisk (daughter of Sissy Spacek), the movie has a lot of charm and heart.

Continue reading: Snow Day Review

Bringing Down The House Review


Weak

Toothlessly trite and inundated with a relentlessly chirpy elevator-music score, "Bringing Down the House" is a ghetto-woman-in-the-ritzy-white-suburbs culture-clash comedy sanitized to oblige the same middle-aged white folks that are the butts of most of its jokes.

It's about an uptight, overworked, miserably divorced tax attorney (a hammy yet vanilla Steve Martin) whose life is turned upside down when a woman he'd flirted with in a legal-forum online chatroom turns up on his doorstep for a date not looking anything like the sophisticated, young white lawyer she'd pretended to be. She is, in fact, a feisty, girthy, street-smart spitfire straight outta Compton (and played with relish by Queen Latifah) who has just escaped from prison and wants Martin's help proving her innocence on an erroneous armed robbery charge.

The movie would have little plot if these two didn't spend the next five reels trying to hoodwink Martin's neighbors and law partners into thinking the loud-and-proud Latifah is a nanny or a maid -- telling lie on top of outrageous lie when a simple variation on the truth ("She's an acquaintance that I'm helping with a case") would have sufficed.

Continue reading: Bringing Down The House Review

Guinevere Review


Good

"Guinevere" is a perceptive story of self-discovery, starring the supremely natural Sarah Polley ("Go," "The Sweet Hereafter") as an unmolded, insecure, 20-year-old beauty whose complex, turbulent, sexual and artistic apprentice with a much older man (Stephen Rea) uncages her creative side and her confidence, long suppressed by her dysfunctional, passionless family.

Taking the initiative for the first time in her life, Harper (Polley) abandons her familial tradition of studying law at Harvard after being tenderly seduced by a photographer at a wedding, who recognizes potential in her that no one else has ever seen.

Connie (Rea) takes Harper under his wing, offering her a home in his studio loft in exchange for nothing more -- or so he says -- than her commitment to exploring the artist within under his tutelage.

Continue reading: Guinevere Review

Snow Day Review


Weak

Somehow, the kid movie genre made it all the way to 2000 without a feature about rugrats running rampant in celebration of snow-closed schools. It's such a great idea that it's hard to imagine nobody thought of it before.

Alas, nobody did. So now enter "Snow Day," a production of kiddie cable network Nickelodeon, in which a band of neighborhood children resolve once and for all to defeat their most wicked adversary -- the sinister Snow Plow Man (Chris Elliott), who takes great glee clearing the roads so efficiently that the kids never get two days off in a row.

This winter, the kids (lead by young Zena Grey, "The Bone Collector") vow to do whatever it takes -- snowball fights, dirty tricks, laying traps, playing chicken with the giant plow and even kidnapping the plow man's scary pet bird -- to get that second snow day.

Continue reading: Snow Day Review

Garden State Review


Excellent

Affectionately wry yet disarmingly poignant, hilariously insightful yet accessibly awkward, infinitely quotable yet organic and unassuming, "Garden State" is a quarter-life-crisis comedy that may just be "The Graduate" for the arrested-development generation.

This merrily ironic tale of looming-maturity malaise has all the consternation of Mike Nichols' definitive touchstone of late-1960s coming-of-age. But in a surprise, triple-threat outburst of unforeseen talent and imagination, the film's writer, director and star -- Zach Braff from TV's "Scrubs" -- truly nails the psychological complexity and raised-on-MTV coercion that has pushed the pause button on coming to grips with adulthood. "Garden State" is, in part, a simile for how people in their 20s now try to extend the age of no responsibilities into their early 30s.

Braff gives a vulnerably acerbic performance as Andrew Largeman ("Large" to his friends), a droll, aimless Everymensch and long-frustrated actor (and sushi-bar waiter by day), who is taking two simultaneous big steps in his life: returning home to New Jersey after nine years to attend his mother's funeral, and doing so without his extensive private pharmacy of sense-dulling psychotropics.

Continue reading: Garden State Review

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Jean Smart Movies

The Accountant Movie Review

The Accountant Movie Review

While this slick dramatic thriller plays with some intriguing ideas and themes, it never actually...

Hope Springs Movie Review

Hope Springs Movie Review

The trailers for this film are misleading, promising raucous comedy from the director of The...

Hope Springs Trailer

Hope Springs Trailer

After 31 years of marriage, Kay is starting to feel disheartened by the lack of...

Life As We Know It Trailer

Life As We Know It Trailer

Being named a godparent is truly a remarkable thing, when Holly and Eric are named...

Youth in Revolt Movie Review

Youth in Revolt Movie Review

Maybe this would work if you saw it before any other Michael Cera movies. Or...

Youth In Revolt Trailer

Youth In Revolt Trailer

Nick Twisp is an average 16 year old boy, obsessed with the opposite sex yet...

Garden State Movie Review

Garden State Movie Review

Even before he finds out his mother has died, Andrew Largeman (Zach Braff) is depressed...

The Kid (2000) Movie Review

The Kid (2000) Movie Review

Remorse is a dangerous thing in the mind of a man. It can hold...

Bringing Down The House Movie Review

Bringing Down The House Movie Review

More than a decade after Steve Martin lost control of his own home in Housesitter,...

Snow Day Movie Review

Snow Day Movie Review

It's tough for a Texas boy to relate to the concept of a snow day....

Sweet Home Alabama Movie Review

Sweet Home Alabama Movie Review

Making only a minimal effort to be any different or better than the hundreds of...

Bringing Down The House Movie Review

Bringing Down The House Movie Review

Toothlessly trite and inundated with a relentlessly chirpy elevator-music score, "Bringing Down the House" is...

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