Jennifer Ehle Page 3

Jennifer Ehle

Jennifer Ehle Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

A Quiet Passion Trailer


Nineteenth-century American poet Emily Dickinson might be well known now for her classic catalogue of work, but when she was alive she was elusive to most. As much as she was always a bright, intelligent and well-behaved child, as she grew older she disappointed her father Edward by refusing to marry or give herself to the church. Instead, she preferred her own company; shutting herself inside and becoming so reclusive and reluctant of guests that she was noticed by many. She shared few friendships in her lifetime, and even those she had - like that with sister-in-law Susan Gilbert - were wrought with pain and uncertainty. She was the victim of a number of bereavements in her lifetime, experiences that would have a massive effect on her health and her later popular literary work.

Continue: A Quiet Passion Trailer

Little Men Trailer


After the death of his father, Brian, Kathy and their son Jake move into a building they inherited. The building is already inhabited by Leonor and her son Jake who rent the shop at the front and the apartment at the back. Jake and Tony soon become friends, they're both into different things but they bond nevertheless.

Jake has always been a bit of a loner and his mum and dad are both glad that Jake finally seems to have a good friend. Each person in the building has their own personal struggles, Leonor's business is quiet and lives apart from her husband whilst Kathy is the main provider for the Jardine family - Brian is a struggling stage actor whose wage doesn't go far enough to cover the family's finances. 

When the Jardine's learn that Leonor's rent is considerably under the average amount for the neighbourhood, they feel they have no other option but to increase the amount she pays. Leonor pleas for the Jardine's to be a little sympathetic to their cause and initially Brian allows her to continue renting the property but when his sister intervenes, he's left with no option but to evict Leonor and Jake.

Continue: Little Men Trailer

Spooks: The Greater Good - Teaser Trailer


Dark times are coming to the United Kingdom. During a handover to MI5 Counter-terrorism leader Harry Pearce (Peter Firth), one of the UK's number one most wanted terrorists, Adam Qasim (Elyes Gabel) devises a way to escape from custody. With a country-wide manhunt in progress, Pearce suddenly disappears, throwing MI5 into chaos. His protégé Will Crombie (Kit Harrington) undertakes the task of hunting down the missing terrorist and finding the lost leader before an attack on London can take place. As he delves deeper into the hidden mysteries surrounding the events, Crombie discovers a worldwide conspiracy with villainous intentions.

Continue: Spooks: The Greater Good - Teaser Trailer

A Little Chaos Trailer


In the palace of Versailles, a tremendous garden is maintained. One day, the builder and head gardener sees an ordinary woman arriving at the palace, and, throwing aside ideas of conformity, chooses to rearrange some of the garden into something that pleases her. He takes her on with the hopes of updating and adding some life to the traditional gardens, and steadily begins to fall for her. As she finds difficulty integrating into the high society that he is from, he ensures her that, in fact, she is envied by the upper classes for her newness. But when that envy turns into something more, the gardener will have to fight tooth and nail to maintain the garden, their love, and their lives.

Continue: A Little Chaos Trailer

Jennifer Ehle Joins 'Fifty Shades' Cast, Will Play Anastasia's Mother


Jennifer Ehle Dakota Johnson Charlie Hunnam Sam Taylor-Wood E.L. James

After months of dithering over casting confirmations, the Fifty Shades of Grey movie makers have finally added another actor to the slowly growing cast credits. British actress Jennifer Ehle has become the latest star to be added to the movie adaptation of EL James' saucy fiction trilogy, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Jennifer Ehle
Jennifer Ehle Is The Latest Name To Be Added To The '50 Shades' Cast.

Ehle, best known for her BAFTA-winning role in the Pride and Prejudice television series, will take the role of Anastasia Steele's mother Carla; a no-nonsense Southern woman who is currently on her fourth husband. The movie will be based on James' often derided "mommy porn" which exploded to the top of bestseller lists worldwide last year.

Continue reading: Jennifer Ehle Joins 'Fifty Shades' Cast, Will Play Anastasia's Mother

Zero Dark Thirty Trailer


Following the tragic events of the twin towers bombing on September 11th 2001 in New York City, Islamic extremist group Al Qaeda's leader Osama Bin Laden was the most wanted man in the entire world. He had managed to evade capture and certain execution for nearly ten years when, in the year of the 10th anniversary of the tragedy, he was found by the extraordinary Navy SEAL Team 6 and shot dead at his residence in Abbottabad, Pakistan on May 2nd. The event, however tarnished with conspiracy theories and speculation, marked a moment in history and was seen as a giant step in the current war on terror. 

'Zero Dark Thirty' is the gritty historical drama telling the story of when Bin Laden was successfully captured and assassinated by a remarkable group of CIA operatives whose covert operations and well-kept secrets gave America their biggest victory in many years. With director Kathryn Bigelow ('Point Break', 'Strange Days') and writer Mark Boal ('In the Valley of Elah') who have previously worked alongside one another on the six time Academy Award winning war flick 'The Hurt Locker', it is set to be a seminal movie that may itself become an important part of history. It is set to be released on January 25th 2013.

Starring: Jessica Chastain, Scott Adkins, Jason Clarke, Joel Edgerton, Chris Pratt, Jennifer Ehle, Mark Strong, Taylor Kinney, James Gandolfini, Mark Duplass, Harold Perrineau, Jennifer Ehle, Kyle Chandler, Frank Grillo, Stephen Dillane & Edgar Ramirez.

Continue: Zero Dark Thirty Trailer

The Ides Of March Review


Excellent
As a writer-director, Clooney delivers another complex exploration of American politics in this lively drama about the pressures of the campaign trail. The plot is somewhat theatrical, but the stellar cast brings it to life.

Steve (Gosling) is working with campaign director Paul (Hoffman) on the presidential campaign of Pennsylvania Governor Mike Morris (Clooney), and the current focus is the pivotal Ohio primary. As Steve starts to fall for young intern Molly (Wood), he is invited to meet with rival campaign manager Tom (Giamatti). And soon he finds his idealistic world disintegrating around him: Molly reveals information that could destroy Morris' campaign, while meeting with Tom jeopardises Steve's job. Meanwhile, backroom deals with an ambitious senator (Wright) call everyone's integrity into question.

Continue reading: The Ides Of March Review

Contagion Review


Excellent
Soderbergh applies his brainier brand of filmmaking to the global outbreak thriller genre, and the result is a hugely gripping blockbuster that never talks down to its audience. It's also terrifyingly believable as we watch a deadly flu virus spread around the world.

In Minneapolis, Mitch (Damon) is horrified when his wife (Paltrow) comes home from a business trip to China, collapses with the flu and dies. But she's only the first of a series of similar cases around the world, and soon officials from the Centers for Disease Control (Winslet, Fishburne and Ehle) and the World Health Organisation (Cotillard) are on the case, trying to manage emerging clusters while tracing the disease back to its source. Meanwhile, a blog hack (Law) is pestering a San Francisco scientist (Gould) for a cure.

Continue reading: Contagion Review

Contagion Trailer


When Beth Emhoff returns home after visiting an opening ceremony for a new factory, she complains of jet lag and her husband, Thomas Emhoff, thinks nothing of it. He becomes concerned when she falls ill, even more so when she has a seizure in front of him and has to be rushed to hospital. It comes as a shock to Thomas when she dies; her cause of death: a highly contagious and rapidly mutating bird flu virus that spreads via human contact. The virus is spreading so fast there is no vaccine or cure for it.

Continue: Contagion Trailer

The King's Speech Review


Extraordinary

Momentous historical events add a remarkable kick to this fascinating personal drama, which is based on journal entries and firsthand accounts. besides being hugely entertaining, the film also gives Colin Firth yet another meaty role to dive into.

In 1925, Bertie (Firth), the Duke of York, is paralysed with fear when required to speak in public. After unsuccessful treatment for his stammer, his wife Elizabeth (Bonham Carter) locates unorthodox speech therapist Lionel Logue (Rush), an Australian who insists on familiarity even with the royals. But as Bertie begins to make progress, his life takes a dramatic turn when his brother Edward VIII (Pearce) abdicates the throne, leaving Bertie in place as George VI just as war breaks out with Germany. Now the nation really needs to hear his voice.

The sharp, often very witty script has the ring of truth to it, refusing to overplay big events or to create some miracle cinematic cure that sees Bertie rising to inspiring orator status. Even though it's still extremely crowd-pleasing, it's a much more complex story centring on the man behind the stutter, exploring the intimate, difficult journey Bertie must have taken before he was so suddenly thrust into the limelight.

As with last year's A Single Man, Firth invests the role with layered subtext that gives Bertie a fully fledged inner life far beyond the astute screenplay.
It's a beautiful performance that tells us as much with a quiet sigh as it does with a razor-sharp line of dialog. His banter with the excellent Rush is also full of substance, while Bonham Carter not only uncannily captures the Queen Mother's physical presence but also the strength of the woman who, together with her husband, would so bravely lead Britain through the Blitz.

Visually, the film transcends the usual costume-drama approach, with expert direction from Hooper that beautifully plays with perspectives and textures.
Also notable is the way the camera quietly captures expansive backdrops that continually remind us (and Bertie) that there's a whole nation out there waiting for his next word. And along the way, we strongly identify with Bertie, which makes his journey takes both stirring and thrillingly inspiring.

Sunshine (2000) Review


Excellent
Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting it. Hopefully, summarizers of the century will follow the example of Hungarian director Istvan Svabo and honestly face the truth, no matter how painful. (Unfortunately, many intellectuals don't always seem interested in the truth --- especially about subjects like communism, which many continue to embrace.)

In Sunshine, Svabo looks back through the last 100 years of his country's history for meaning, and finds some --- enough to fill a three-hour, soapy epic about the century's chaos. The film mostly works, and is a worthy addition to Svabo's art.

Continue reading: Sunshine (2000) Review

Jennifer Ehle - Sunday 10th June 2007 at Radio City Music Hall New York City, USA

Jennifer Ehle

Jennifer Ehle - Wednesday 16th May 2007 at Tony Awards New York City, USA

Jennifer Ehle
Jennifer Ehle
Jennifer Ehle
Jennifer Ehle

Jennifer Ehle Monday 14th May 2007 Soho Rep’s 2007 Spring Gala at 101 Riverviews. New York City, USA

Jennifer Ehle
Jennifer Ehle
Jennifer Ehle

Pride And Prejudice (1995) Review


Excellent
Most film adaptations of classic books are inferior to the books they are based on. This is partly because the written word allows more nuance than the camera, but also because great books don't always have enough plotting or action to make great movies, and film adaptations often overcompensate by rewriting the book in a quest to make it more cinematic. The most obvious recent example (speaking of quests) is The Lord of the Rings: Peter Jackson omitted key scenes, changed others, and generally jacked up Tolkien's fanatically-loved bestseller for no good reason.

So it's an achievement when a famous book makes it to the big screen, or the small screen, intact -- and kudos must go to the A&E/BBC miniseries Pride and Prejudice for flawlessly recreating the classic Jane Austen novel. This production is as faithful to the book as Cliff notes (though at five hours long, it's not much of a time-saver -- you might as well read the book). The filmmakers fill in the off-camera scenes of the book so seamlessly that Austen might have written them herself.

Continue reading: Pride And Prejudice (1995) Review

Sunshine Review


Excellent
Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting it. Hopefully, summarizers of the century will follow the example of Hungarian director Istvan Svabo and honestly face the truth, no matter how painful. (Unfortunately, many intellectuals don't always seem interested in the truth --- especially about subjects like communism, which many continue to embrace.)

In Sunshine, Svabo looks back through the last 100 years of his country's history for meaning, and finds some --- enough to fill a three-hour, soapy epic about the century's chaos. The film mostly works, and is a worthy addition to Svabo's art.

Continue reading: Sunshine Review

Possession Review


Bad
A.S. Byatt's Booker Award-winning novel Possession might have provided some literary delight, following two academics who track the love letters of a Victorian poet and his free-spirited mistress. That doesn't translate well to cinema, though. Neil LaBute's film adaptation boils down to a buttoned-down Gwyneth Paltrow (sporting her Academy Award winning faux-Brit accent from Shakespeare in Love) and square-jawed Aaron Eckhart running from one Masterpiece Theater location to the next (the library, the moors, the waterfall, the gothic archway, the castle wall, and the moonlit graveyard) all the while reading aloud from the correspondence of dead Englishmen.

While it might make a charming book-on-tape for the Oprah crowd, this "love loves to love love" hokum masquerades as a real movie. The present day academics exist in counterpoint to the period movie flashbacks (basically Jeremy Northam donning his suit again and looking forlorn, intercut with shots of his beautiful mistress Jennifer Ehle looking voluptuous and forlorn). And they talk, talk, talk about subtext within the letters; but they're actually talking about each other. Yes, it's When Harry Met Sally in the Library. So help me God, Eckhart's emotional revelation is when he asks Paltrow, "Is there an Us in You and Me?" (If I were Paltrow, I'd say, "I'll call you.")

Continue reading: Possession Review

Wilde Review


Weak
You would think the life of Oscar Wilde would lend itself more to film. Not so. This biopic is unfathomably boring and ultimately pointless.

Bedrooms & Hallways Review


Good

Gay guys whining about their complicated sex lives may be wearing a bit thin as a staple for alternative romantic comedies, but "Bedrooms and Hallways" gives this retread genre a good, swift kick in the pants.

A light, soap-operatic satire of shifting sexual orientation from Rose Troche, the director of "Go Fish," this Brit import has been a buzz flick at Gay and Lesbian film festivals all year long for its steady supply of laughs, its exploration of sexual identity and its somewhat surprising last act.

Kevin McKidd ("Trainspotting") stars as Leo, a reserved, romantically frustrated 30-year-old whose surprise birthday party, which opens the film, quickly becomes an fusion of all the entanglements in his life.

Continue reading: Bedrooms & Hallways Review

Sunshine Review


OK

"Sunshine" is a complex, cross-generational saga about the social, romantic and soul-searching struggles of a proud Jewish family in early 20th Century Hungary. It's a three-hour epic that spans several decades, and while that's a long time to sit still for what is essentially dramatized genealogy, the movie's only unequivocal fault is that it is -- believe it or not -- far too short.

A labor of love from director Istvan Szabo ("Mephisto") -- who co-wrote the film with playwright Israel Horovitz and based it, in part, on episodes in his family history -- this is an intense and personal film with beauty and scope to spare. But with nearly a century of territory to cover and more than a dozen primary characters to enfold, even at 180 minutes, it feels rushed -- like the cinematic equivalent of Cliffs Notes for a great novel.

To give the audience something constant to hang on to throughout the picture, Szabo cast Ralph Fiennes to play three generations of men in the Sonnenschein family, a clan whose fortune comes from an heirloom recipe for tasty, healing herbal tonic known as A Taste of Sunshine -- turned into a popular drink in the late 19th Century by the Sonnenschein patriarch.

Continue reading: Sunshine Review

Possession Review


Good

Interweaving two hindrance-hurdling love stories that share a literary connection but take place more than a century apart, director Neil LaBute has taken another large and confident step into an unexpected genre with gratifying results.

"Possession," which is lovingly but sometimes loosely adapted from A.S. Byatt's novel of the same name, follows the germinating romance between two relationship-reluctant academics as they in turn follow a trail of evidence revealing a passionate secret affair between two Victorian poets.

A wild departure from LaBute's previous films -- the caustic, even cruel social satires "In the Company of Men" and "Your Friends and Neighbors," and the upbeat black comedy "Nurse Betty" -- this effort has the melodic trappings of a Merchant-Ivory romance. But it's also a perceptive musing on what has and hasn't changed between the two time periods in the emotional, practical and sometimes prohibitive logistics of love.

Continue reading: Possession Review

Jennifer Ehle

Jennifer Ehle Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Jennifer Ehle Movies

A Quiet Passion Movie Review

A Quiet Passion Movie Review

British writer-director Terence Davies (The Deep Blue Sea) is an expert at digging beneath the...

A Quiet Passion Trailer

A Quiet Passion Trailer

Nineteenth-century American poet Emily Dickinson might be well known now for her classic catalogue of...

Little Men Trailer

Little Men Trailer

After the death of his father, Brian, Kathy and their son Jake move into a...

A Little Chaos Movie Review

A Little Chaos Movie Review

Audiences looking for a French historical costume drama should look elsewhere, but those who enjoy...

Spooks: The Greater Good Trailer

Spooks: The Greater Good Trailer

Will Holloway is faced with not only the most critical event of his career as...

Fifty Shades of Grey Movie Review

Fifty Shades of Grey Movie Review

After all the hype, it's impossible not to expect steam from this adaptation of E.L....

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Clips And Extended Trailer

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Clips And Extended Trailer

When reserved college girl Anastasia Steele meets mysterious businessman Christian Grey for an interview, she...

Spooks: The Greater Good - Teaser Trailer

Spooks: The Greater Good - Teaser Trailer

Dark times are coming to the United Kingdom. During a handover to MI5 Counter-terrorism leader...

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Fairy Tale TV Spot Trailer

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Fairy Tale TV Spot Trailer

Sometimes, a single favour to a friend can end up changing you entirely. When a...

Black Or White Trailer

Black Or White Trailer

When a young girl's mother dies in childbirth, she is sent to live with her...

A Little Chaos Trailer

A Little Chaos Trailer

In the palace of Versailles, a tremendous garden is maintained. One day, the builder and...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.