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'Only Lovers Left Alive': Why This Achingly Cool Vampire Romance Is So Not 'Twilight' [Trailer]


Tilda Swinton Jim Jarmusch Mia Wasikowska

Only Lovers Left Alive is released in cinemas today, bringing Jim Jarmusch's supernatural romance to theatres. The movie's main draw is of course its two British leads: Tilda Swinton and Thor's Tom HIddlestone play the alluring onscreen vampire couple Adam and Eve, who are trying to find their way in the modern world.

Only Lovers Left Alive Swinton Hiddlestone
Tilda Swinton & Tom Hiddlestone Cut A Deathly Cool Couple In 'Only Lovers Left Alive.'

Described as a "crypto-vampire love story" by the director, Only Lovers Left Alive brings to life a fantastical yet gritty imagining of a modern day vampire tale. You'd have thought that by now, our desire for vampire romance movies would be well and truly sated, particularly after the five Twilight movies.

Continue reading: 'Only Lovers Left Alive': Why This Achingly Cool Vampire Romance Is So Not 'Twilight' [Trailer]

Jim Jarmusch - 66th Cannes Film Festival - 'Only Lovers Left Alive' - Photocall - Cannes, France - Saturday 25th May 2013

Jim Jarmusch
John Hurt, Tom Hiddleston, Jim Jarmusch and Tilda Swinton
Jim Jarmusch
Jim Jarmusch
Jim Jarmusch
Jim Jarmusch

Jim Jarmusch Tuesday 25th October 2011 Playboy hosts the New York premiere of 'The Rum Diary' at the Museum of Modern Art - Outside Arrivals New York City, USA

Jim Jarmusch

The Limits Of Control Review


Excellent
While it's probably too meandering and vague for mainstream cinemagoers, this offbeat thriller is a terrific example of Jarmusch's subtly cheeky tone, plus gorgeous Christopher Doyle cinematography and a terrific cast.

A lone man (De Bankole) is on a mysterious mission, flying into Madrid then travelling to Seville and Alicante. Along the way, he has a series of clandestine meetings with a nervous violinist (Tosar), an enigmatic blonde (Swinton), a naked seductress (de la Huerta), a British guitarist (Hurt), an edgy Mexican (Garcia Bernal), a silent driver (Abbas) and an arrogant American (Murray). But he's all business, never distracted from his assignment and quietly hearing the philosophy that seems to swirl around his every move.

Continue reading: The Limits Of Control Review

Jim Jarmusch and Paz de la Huerta - Jim Jarmusch and Paz De La Huerta New York City, USA - Special New York screening of 'The Limits of Control' at Landmark's Sunshine Theater - Arrivals Tuesday 28th April 2009

Jim Jarmusch and Paz De La Huerta
Paz De La Huerta and Jim Jarmusch
Jim Jarmusch
Jim Jarmusch and Paz De La Huerta
Isaach De Bankole and Jim Jarmusch
Paz De La Huerta and Jim Jarmusch

Night On Earth Review


Very Good
Riding around five shaded cityscapes in four different countries, Jim Jarmusch's nocturnal delight Night on Earth has the esteem of being the auteur's most accessible exercise to date while also being his least seen. After its premiere at the 29th New York Film Festival, this set of through-the-windshield vignettes was picked up for a short theatrical run in May of 1992 before it was released on VHS and only released on DVD in foreign markets (Australia put out two separate editions). That was until those noblest practitioners of cinephilia over at Criterion took a special interest in Jarmusch, releasing both Earth and his 1984 opus Stranger Than Paradise, which also includes the director's fascinating debut feature Permanent Vacation.

Throughout the course of one night, we are driven around in five separate taxi cabs that range from familiar ports of L.A. and New York City to the echoing streets of Paris and Rome to the final ride through the frozen-over metropolis of Helsinki, right as the sun is rising. In Los Angeles, a big-time agent (Gena Rowlands) tries to seduce her rough-and-tumble cab driver (an insolent Winona Ryder) into becoming an actress. While in New York, a jerky Brooklynite (the superb Giancarlo Esposito) teaches his German cab driver (Armin Mueller-Stahl) how to drive, talk, and jive correctly while also trying to escort his sister-in-law (Rosie Perez) home.

Continue reading: Night On Earth Review

Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten Review


Excellent
The flames from the bonfires around which the participants in Julien Temple's loving filmic portrait Joe Strummer: The Future is Unwritten helps bring something more to their faces and words than the cold glare of a documentarian's prying camera. Warmth, heat, honesty... whatever it is, that factor is a large part of what makes this documentary such a rollicking, damn near inspirational film, since these people for the most part don't appear to be simply spitting words at an interviewer in the standard manner of a documentary, but rather conversing. They're not being interviewed, it seems, but just talking, telling stories around a fire to whomever happens to be listening (as one does), helping the crackling flames keep back the circle of night by remembering one of the century's most astounding and inexplicable talents.

A child of British diplomats who was always keenly embarrassed of his public school education and refers to himself as "a mouthy little git," Strummer was squatting in London with gypsies in the mid-1970s, busking for food money, playing in a pub band called the 101ers, and generally charming the pants off of everyone he met. It was a hand-to-mouth existence, but seemed like the kind of thing Strummer could do for years, living his beloved lowlife. Then he was being introduced to a trio of short-haired punks, The Clash was formed, and Strummer was on his way to rock stardom. He wasn't a singer, he was a yelper (as some fantastic footage of him laying down the vocal track for "White Riot" shows particularly well), a snaggletoothed smoker with a penchant for nonsensical lyrics and overblown statements. But in Strummer's work, with The Clash and afterwards, there always rang true a tone of absolute and unmistakable sincerity, sung and played with complete conviction each and every time. This was a man without irony, leading a band that set the model for all the conscious groups which would follow (tellingly, Bono is one of the interviewees here, talking about The Clash being his first concert, and in short the reason he got into music).

Continue reading: Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten Review

Stranger Than Paradise Review


Excellent
Jim Jarmusch's debut feature Stranger Than Paradise seems both a throwback to the American independents of the '60s and '70s, and a harbinger of what was to come in the years following its release. The film stands as a link between the past and the future, a synthesis of the Cassavetes-Scorsese brand of streetwise naturalism, and the aloofness and wry humor that characterizes much of modern independent cinema (Wes Anderson and Richard Linklater's output, in particular).

At once artless and artful, dramatically unfocused yet layered throughout with unmistakable observations about mid-'80s American melancholia, Stranger Than Paradise displays all the strengths and weaknesses of Jarmusch's brand of cinema. While experiencing his stories, the viewer may suspect that, beneath the patina of captivating movie moments, the director has nothing particularly to say about, well, anything, but is simply creating images because he feels like it, and stringing them together with vintage jazz, rock, and world music selections. Just short of expressing any sense of purpose or point of view, at least conventionally speaking, a Jarmusch movie will peter out. The characters do not advance much, though each will have embarked on journeys, and shared moments of wry hilarity. But, spiritually, they remain near or exactly where they began.

Continue reading: Stranger Than Paradise Review

Cannes Man Review


Bad
The most intriguing part of Cannes Man is virtually unknown director Richard Martini cajoled stars like Johnny Depp and Lara Flynn Boyle to appear in his barely amusing semi-mockumentary. (Editor's note: Another director, Susan Shaprio, recently wrote me to contest Martini's ownership of the film. More as it develops.) The film tells a story of a Jersey punk (Francesco Quinn) who hooks up with a smarmy producer (Seymour Cassel) at Cannes to produce his dream flick, a sci-fi something or other inspired by the works of Troma.

The catch: Cassel's only doing it on a bet that he can turn any old jerk into the toast of the Cannes film festival.

Continue reading: Cannes Man Review

Mystery Train Review


OK
Another oddity odyssey courtesy of Jim Jarmusch, Mystery Train is actually his first color film and hardly his best work. Following a triptych of stories in a sleepy, run-down Memphis hotel (the train itself is considerably less important to the story), while the movie has a number of gigglish moments, on the whole it's a disappointment of squandered story ideas that plod on without much happening. Pretty typical of Jarmusch's characters' on-screen chattiness.

Down By Law Review


Excellent
American independent director Jim Jarmusch leaped onto the world cinema stage with the idiosyncratic deadpan road movie Stranger than Paradise in 1984 and then followed it up with the equally distinctive prison break movie Down by Law in 1986.

Down by Law became an immediate cult hit partly because of its pokey humor style but also because it starred musicians Tom Waits and John Lurie along side upstart Italian comedian Roberto Benigni - who is so over-the-top he really revs up the film's expressionless tempo.

Continue reading: Down By Law Review

Ghost Dog: The Way Of The Samurai Review


Excellent
Written and directed by Jim Jarmusch, Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai embodies a variety of genres from Mobster to Urban to Martial Arts. Jarmusch, critically acclaimed for Mystery Train (1989) and Stranger Than Paradise (1984), stays true to his uniquely languid and methodical style in telling the fascinating story of Ghost Dog (Forest Whitaker - The Crying Game, Phenomenon), a contract killer who has isolated himself from society by taking refuge in a shack atop an inner city rooftop that he shares with a flock of pigeons.

Ghost Dog studies the early eighteenth century Japanese warrior code from the book, Hagakure: The Way of the Samurai, and the story is told as a sequence of verses from the ancient text. Each morning he bows to the altar he has constructed and practices the ancient disciplines of the samurai training. In the spirit of the ancient warriors, he has pledged his loyalty to a single master, a small-time mobster named Louie (John Tormey - Kiss Me Guido, Jungle 2 Jungle), who saved Ghost Dog's life when he was young. As an assassin, Ghost Dog communicates only via carrier pigeon and moves through the night like a phantom, killing with the skill and speed of a true Samurai.

Continue reading: Ghost Dog: The Way Of The Samurai Review

Blue In The Face Review


Good
It took all of five days after wrapping the shoot of Smoke to create Blue in the Face, an (allegedly) all-improvised follow-up to Wayne Wang and Paul Auster's feature centered on a tiny smoke shop in Brooklyn. It's a weird experiment in filmmaking, studded with cameos by Lou Reed, Madonna, Michael J. Fox, Roseanne, Lily Tomlin, and more. Unfortunately, you've probably seen all the funniest bits in the movie's trailer.

Separated into segments with titles like "Brooklyn Attitude," Blue in the Face explores the Brooklyn mystique and the Brooklyn experience with video interviews and impromptu sketches. Everything "Brooklyn" is praised, from Ebbets Field and Jackie Robinson to Belgian Waffles and the sanctity of the local cigar store.

Continue reading: Blue In The Face Review

Cannes Man Review


Bad
The most intriguing part of Cannes Man is virtually unknown director Richard Martini cajoled stars like Johnny Depp and Lara Flynn Boyle to appear in his barely amusing semi-mockumentary. The film tells a story of a Jersey punk (Francesco Quinn) who hooks up with a smarmy producer (Seymour Cassel) at Cannes to produce his dream flick, a sci-fi something or other inspired by the works of Troma.

The catch: Cassel's only doing it on a bet that he can turn any old jerk into the toast of the Cannes film festival.

Continue reading: Cannes Man Review

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Jim Jarmusch Movies

Paterson Movie Review

Paterson Movie Review

Unpredictable filmmaker Jim Jarmusch ricochets from his artful vampire movie Only Lovers Left Alive into...

Paterson Trailer

Paterson Trailer

A week in the life of Paterson (Adam Driver); a bus driver who happens to...

Gimme Danger Trailer

Gimme Danger Trailer

As the trailer begins, you hear Jim Jarmusch announce that he's "in an undisclosed location...

Only Lovers Left Alive Movie Review

Only Lovers Left Alive Movie Review

It's hardly surprising that laconic filmmaker Jim Jarmusch (Broken Flowers) has created such an inventively...

Only Lovers Left Alive Trailer

Only Lovers Left Alive Trailer

An ancient vampire named Adam is desperate to remain hidden from the world in his...

The Limits of Control Movie Review

The Limits of Control Movie Review

While it's probably too meandering and vague for mainstream cinemagoers, this offbeat thriller is a...

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Stranger Than Paradise Movie Review

Stranger Than Paradise Movie Review

Jim Jarmusch's debut feature Stranger Than Paradise seems both a throwback to the American independents...

Z Channel: A Magnificent Obsession Movie Review

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Z Channel was one of the first pay cable stations ever. It's "magnificent obsession" was...

Coffee And Cigarettes Movie Review

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