Joel Edgerton admits it was a ''very special'' experience to work with rising Hollywood star Timothee Chalamet on 'The King'.

The 45-year-old actor plays Falstaff opposite 23-year-old Timothee's King Henry V in David Michod's new epic - which is inspired by several plays from William Shakespeare's 'Henriad'.

Joel enjoyed all his time on set with Timothee and felt as though he learned how to appreciate the shooting process as a ''singular event'' from his younger co-star.

Speaking to BANG Showbiz at the BFI London Film Festival premiere of the movie, Joel said: ''It was very special ... He carves out each film as a moment because he doesn't take it lightly. I feel like every movie he does is a singular event.''

Joel enjoyed getting to do Shakespeare again as he has fond memories of playing Prince Hal - the young Henry V - 20 years ago.

He said: ''I played Hal back in 1999 and 2000. These plays are very much in my psyche and in my heart.

''It's almost a bittersweet thing to separate it from the text but it was part of the early conversations to give us the freedom to say our own things about politics and the world through the life of this man.''

Also speaking on the red carpet, Timothee admitted he loved the challenge of playing King Henry V and as his career goes forward he wants to keep portraying ''interesting roles''.

Speaking to talkRADIO, he said: ''I just want to work on anything good. That could be mini series, TV, Broadway, Old Vic or whatever ... Hopefully I get to keep doing good roles that are interesting 10 years from now.''

'The King' - which also stars Sean Harris, Robert Pattinson and Ben Mendelsohn - will be shown on Netflix from November following its October 11 release but Timothee has no concerns about the effect streaming could have on the moviemaking business because it's just the way people consume media now.

The Best Actor Academy Award nominee said: ''People my age watch things on Netflix. Joel actually said to me, 'How many of your favourite movies did you see in a theatre for the first time?' And it's true, not many of them.''