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The Informers Review


Bad
The drug-addled zombies lurching through Gregor Jordan's The Informers are relics, dinosaurs from a decadent decade who belong in a museum, not a movie theater. Their destructively self-absorbed attitudes might have shocked audiences in 1983, the year the picture is set. Since then, however, we've spent too much time in the dead zones of Melrose Place, The O.C., and The Hills to be shaken by southern California's over-privileged fraternity.

Like a soap opera, Informers introduces multiple characters and touches on their issues. The nicest ones are stoners, voyeurs, and adulterers. On the flip side, we get kidnappers, drug dealers, and pedophiles.

Continue reading: The Informers Review

Kim Basinger Monday 17th November 2008 at Mann Village Theater Los Angeles Premiere of the film 'Twilight' held at Mann Village Theater

Kim Basinger
Kim Basinger
Kim Basinger
Kim Basinger

Batman (1989) Review


Excellent
Batman has changed over the years. He's gone from Holy Rusted Metal to hallucinogens, from campy to comedy and then back to campy. He's been through more first ladies than half of its leading men, and has seen more directors than an ingénue.

First up to bat in the Batman movies was Tim Burton, fresh off of Beetlejuice and right before Edward Scisscorhands. Burton's Gotham is a noirish nightmare that grabs you from the opening scene. Batman is still a spook story to criminals, but he's a rumor spreading like wildfire. Bumbling on the trail is jackass journalist Alexander Knox (Robert Wuhl), and the girl drawn to the mystery of the bat is Vicky Vale (Kim Basinger).

Continue reading: Batman (1989) Review

Kim Basinger Thursday 27th September 2007 DKMS Life's 2nd annual Dreamball 2007 at Deutsches Historisches Museum Berlin, Germany

Kim Basinger
Kim Basinger

Even Money Review


Weak
Gambling can mess people up. I've ridden in enough cabs in Vegas to have heard plenty of those stories.

This is a movie about a few more of 'em: A father (Forest Whitaker), saddled with debt, begs his college basketball star brother to lose games to pay off his bookies. And perhaps more overdone: A blocked writer (Kim Basinger) hooks up with a failed magician (Danny DeVito) to learn how to play cards and lose her and her husband's (Ray Liotta) savings. Kelsey Grammar's crippled vice detective and Tim Roth's gangster add to the mix, reminding you just how much acting talent director Mark Rydell managed to accumulate for the movie, only to squander it on a messy script that ties these story fragments together haphazardly.

Continue reading: Even Money Review

The Natural Review


Good
Robert Redford is beloved for his roles in numerous films, but his work in The Natural has to rank as one of the few on top, despite the fact that, with a $48 million box office, it hardly ranks as one of his bigger hits.

The film remains, next to Field of Dreams, one of the world's oddest baseball movies. Roy Hobbs (Redford) is a child wunderkind at the game. After playing some ball at a carnival, he's summarily shot in the chest by a femme fatale (Barbara Hershey), who is clearly working for agents that want him not to be the greatest player of all time, which Hobbs says he aims to be.

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The Sentinel (2006) Review


Weak
The Sentinel is one of those movies made for commercials and trailers full of shots of well-dressed Secret Service agents running and impassioned scenes where actors bark out lines like, "He's looking for an ally and the First Lady is a fine one to have." Rarely do these movies translate well into a longer format, and The Sentinel is far from the exception.

Directed by Clark Johnson (he of the awful S.W.A.T.), The Sentinel stars Michael Douglas and Kiefer Sutherland as former friends forced to become allies after a plot reveals an unknown mole inside the Secret Service. Pete Garrison (Douglas) is a veteran agent drawn deeper into the plot after his affair with the President's wife (Kim Basinger, playing the curviest First Lady ever) is revealed, leading investigator David Breckinridge (Sutherland) to turn his attentions to Garrison. Meanwhile, TV's babe of the moment Eva Longoria co-stars as Breckinridge's sexy new partner and Garrison's protégé.

Continue reading: The Sentinel (2006) Review

The Sentinel Review


Weak

The Sentinel is one of those movies made for commercials and trailers full of shots of well-dressed Secret Service agents running and impassioned scenes where actors bark out lines like, "He's looking for an ally and the First Lady is a fine one to have." Rarely do these movies translate well into a longer format, and The Sentinel is far from the exception.

Directed by Clark Johnson (he of the awful S.W.A.T.), The Sentinel stars Michael Douglas and Kiefer Sutherland as former friends forced to become allies after a plot reveals an unknown mole inside the Secret Service. Pete Garrison (Douglas) is a veteran agent drawn deeper into the plot after his affair with the President's wife (Kim Basinger, playing the curviest First Lady ever) is revealed, leading investigator David Breckinridge (Sutherland) to turn his attentions to Garrison. Meanwhile, TV's babe of the moment Eva Longoria co-stars as Breckinridge's sexy new partner and Garrison's protégé.

Continue reading: The Sentinel Review

Nine 1/2 Weeks Review


Excellent
I have no idea what Nine 1/2 Weeks is supposed to be about. I do know this: Basinger is hot, naked, and covered in food. Sounds ridiculous, but hey, this movie is based on a novel written by a woman.

I Dreamed Of Africa Review


Weak
Kim Basinger has gone off to Africa on safari, in search of a follow-up Oscar to the one she landed for L.A. Confidential. Looks like she'll be coming home empty-handed, I'm sad to say.

Drawing comparisons to such Man vs. Nature films as Out of Africa, A Far Off Place, and The Ghost and the Darkness, I Dreamed of Africa tells the true story of Kuki Gallmann (Basinger), an Italian divorcee who upends her life to move to Kenya with her second husband Paolo (Vincent Gallo), who, ahem, dreams of buying a 100,000 acre cattle ranch in the middle of nowhere.

Continue reading: I Dreamed Of Africa Review

Cellular Review


Good
When my cell phone rings, before I answer, I always check to see who's calling. If I don't know who it is, I'll likely not accept the call. With airtime at a premium and overage charges through the roof, it just makes good sense. It's also the reason why cell phones include caller ID! But in Cellular, when a random call is accepted, it sets forth a series of events that takes one man on an incredible journey across Los Angeles to save the caller on the other line.

The man is Ryan (Chris Evans), and according to his former girlfriend Chloe (Jessica Biel), he's just an irresponsible and self-centered beach bum - not exactly the person you'd want on the line if your life depended on it. The random call comes from Jessica Martin (Kim Basinger), a science teacher and mother who's been kidnapped from her Brentwood mansion and is being held hostage in the attic of an abandoned house. While in captivity, a desperate Jessica is miraculously able to splice together some wires from a telephone that is smashed to pieces by her abductor (Jason Statham). Somehow, her resulting call reaches Ryan.

Continue reading: Cellular Review

L.A. Confidential Review


Excellent
L.A. Confidential, despite what you've heard, is not the best film in 20 years. It's not even the best film of 1997 (current titleholder: In the Company of Men). But if you consider all films ever made that have the nasal Danny Devito providing voice-over work, L.A. Confidential is certainly at the top of that list.

Comparisons to Chinatown are obvious and appropriate. Both films take place in the Los Angeles of yesteryear, feature multi-layered crime riddles, and have stars with questionable morals as ersatz heroes. And both are very good. While Brian Helgeland and Curtis Hanson's script isn't the tight masterpiece that Chinatown is (the writers meander for a good 45 minutes before his story starts to shape up), and Faye Dunaway wasn't half the cheeseball that Kim Basinger is as the femme fatale, L.A. Confidentialmakes the audience do what few films of the 90s have achieved: think.

Continue reading: L.A. Confidential Review

People I Know Review


Weak
People I Know is a character study cum murder mystery that won't be known to many theatre patrons and won't be missed. It's a labored 24-hour journey with a worn-out New York publicist (also known as a press agent) struggling to maintain the residue of vitality he enjoyed in an earlier life. More characters in the story show him the admiration he once commanded than moviegoers are likely to. There's not much to admire.

The film starts with entrenched Big Apple dweller Al Pacino affecting a Georgia accent -- interesting, but no more required by the plotline than if he had come from Florida or North Dakota. About all the southern background does for his character, Eli Wurman, is provide an exaggeration to his promotional pushiness at one time, and slow, slurry speech to befit his character's drug-induced degradation at other times.

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The Door In The Floor Review


Weak
Adapted from the first third of John Irving's sprawling novel A Widow For One Year, Tod Williams' The Door in the Floor is a high-minded piece of manipulative melodramatic bunk (with a horrible title) that rides a rising crest of pretension before splashing moviegoers down into a cold bath of self-indulgent faux tragedy. The story of an unhappy couple who welcome, with calamitous consequences, a young teen into their lives during a summer at their beachfront home, it's a disingenuous film that deals in the upper-class ennui and sorrow of The Ice Storm and Moonlight Mile, desperately clinging to an affected pose of photogenic misery but failing to even approximate reasonable human emotion or behavior.

Eccentric children's book author and womanizer Ted Cole (an adequately flaky Jeff Bridges) lost his two sons in a car accident years ago, and though he and his wife Marion (Kim Basinger) have relocated to a quaint New Hampshire town and attempted to fill the void in their lives by having daughter Ruth (Elle Fanning), they're still reeling from their family catastrophe and poised to separate. In a supremely idiotic decision, Ted hires Eddie (Jon Foster), a young student from Phillips Exeter Academy who looks just like his deceased oldest son, to be his assistant. However, the freewheeling writer - whose hipness is supposedly confirmed by his penchant for walking around naked in front of others, making erotic sketches of his mistress Mrs. Vaughn (Mimi Rogers), and listening to skanky hip-hop before watching Girls Gone Wild - makes a grave mistake by having the kid work during the day at his wife's nearby apartment. Eddie takes a masturbatory liking to Marion's bra and panties, and when he's caught in the act of self-gratification by the female object of his desire, she's all too willing to accommodate his Mrs. Robinson-patterned longings.

Continue reading: The Door In The Floor Review

Bless The Child Review


Bad
Yes, August is upon us and with it comes the second appearance of the twice-yearly dumping ground for Hollywood. Like the February doldrums, August brings us films filled with fading stars and awful storylines that weren't deemed good enough to break even after a big summer marketing campaign, nor will they be able to go toe to toe with meatier fare during Oscar season.

And to open August, enter Bless the Child, possibly the worst movie I've seen this year. Well, after Mission to Mars.

Continue reading: Bless The Child Review

Nine 1/2 Weeks Review


Excellent
I have no idea what Nine 1/2 Weeks is supposed to be about. I do know this: Basinger is hot, naked, and covered in food. Sounds ridiculous, but hey, this movie is based on a novel written by a woman.

Wayne's World 2 Review


Weak
Gotta love those references to An Officer and a Gentleman. Having Chris Farley channel depressed pilot-in-training Richard Gere during the tear-soaked line, "I got no place else ta go-ho-hooooooooo," is almost worth the price of admission right there. Too bad that Wayne's World 2 is mostly just mining the same pop culture terrain as its far more worthy predecessor. It was a surprise to see that Mike Myers and Dana Carvey were able to take their "two guys on a couch" cable access rock 'n' rollers through even one feature length adventure, with enjoyable detours to an Alice Cooper concert as well as a playful game of street hockey. Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" was instantly embraced by a generation of kids who didn't even know Freddy Mercury from Adam -- poor bastards. Hasn't anyone seen Highlander? Jesus Christ, what the hell's wrong with the kids of America, anyway? Don't answer that.

Wayne's World 2 opens with our dynamic duo still running their own show, though they've moved from their basement to a warehouse. Good for them, right? But when smarmy record producer Bobby Cahn (Christopher Walken, coasting but still The Man) steps in to make life miserable and steal Wayne's lovely girlfriend Cassandra (Tia Carrere, who still can't act but is still One Hot Tamale), Wayne is told in a vision by Jim Morrison(!) that he should stage a rock concert in Aurora, Illinois. Waynestock, of course. "If you book them, they will come." This will bring Cassandra back and, no doubt, provide a sense of meaning in Wayne's slacker life. Right? Right? Uh... maybe.

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8 Mile Review


Very Good
What up, dawg? Rolled wit my boys to the 8 Mile screening to see my homey Eminem's new movie. Man, that shiznit was off da hook. At first, I was worried that Eminem might sell out, 'cuz I seen him everywhere talkin' about this movie, man. He showed the love on MTV's Movie House, and was on the cover of my father's Entertainment Weekly wearin' boxing gloves. But no worries, this ain't no Glitter II. Em kept his cool, and his new movie was straight dope.

Word.

Continue reading: 8 Mile Review

Ready To Wear Review


Weak
Ready to Wear, a supposed send-up of the fashion world, is a big disappointment, this time from Robert Altman. I got the feeling that Altman didn't really have any idea what he wanted to say with this film (which he later conceded in a TV interview). Altman has to resort to slapstick and dog excrement to make the audience laugh, despite about a zillion big-name stars. Occasionally, people manage to shine despite the cheesy story, making it mildly entertaining.

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Batman Review


Excellent
Batman has changed over the years. He's gone from Holy Rusted Metal to hallucinogens, from campy to comedy and then back to campy. He's been through more first ladies than half of its leading men, and has seen more directors than an ingénue.

First up to bat in the Batman movies was Tim Burton, fresh off of Beetlejuice and right before Edward Scisscorhands. Burton's Gotham is a noirish nightmare that grabs you from the opening scene. Batman is still a spook story to criminals, but he's a rumor spreading like wildfire. Bumbling on the trail is jackass journalist Alexander Knox (Robert Wuhl), and the girl drawn to the mystery of the bat is Vicky Vale (Kim Basinger).

Continue reading: Batman Review

8 Mile Review


Good

OK, yes -- Eminem can act. In fact, he can carry a movie. The charismatically angry white hip-hop star is in every scene of "8 Mile" -- a film inspired in part by his own days as a hungry young rapper, scrapping his way through smack-down rhyme battles in mid-1990s Detroit. And while some may say he's not doing much more than playing himself, Eminem shows enough resourceful nuance and emotional intuition that he cannot be summarily dismissed.

Of course, it doesn't hurt that he's directed by Curtis Hanson, who has proven his acumen and passion for producing movies as inspired and extraordinary as "L.A. Confidential" and the off-kilter, tragically overlooked intellectual comedy "Wonder Boys."

The story here is not a rise-to-glory cliché with a lucrative recording contract waiting for the hero at the closing credits. It's a realistic, struggling-class drama about a tough kid from the white side of the Motor City ghetto who wants to prove himself as a rapper and "get out of the D."

Continue reading: 8 Mile Review

I Dreamed Of Africa Review


Bad

Almost entirely scenery and labored melodrama, "I Dreamed of Africa" is a terribly earnest effort at making a weepy women's Event Picture from the memoirs of a American socialite roughing it on a ranch in Kenya.

Kim Basinger, in her first screen effort since winning the Oscar for "L.A. Confidential," take the lead as Kuki Gallmann, a real-life divorcee who moved to a derelict 100,000-acre ranch on the East African plains with her young son and her intrepid new husband in the early 1980s.

Tinged with tragedy and adventure, but very little depth, the film plays like entries being read at random from Gallmann's diary. It has a decade's worth of incidents it wants to touch on, but doesn't have a clue how to segue between them. The script has no organic flow whatsoever, racing roughshod over years at once (her son goes from 7 to 14 to 17 in two scenes) and leaving little time for character development.

Continue reading: I Dreamed Of Africa Review

Bless The Child Review


Terrible

Re-enforcing their stuck-in-B-list status, Kim Basinger and Jimmy Smits star this week in a laughably gothic second-coming chiller, "Bless the Child," which once again commandeers Catholic dogma as a jumping-off point for a half-witted, high-gloss horror movie.

Like "Stigmata" and "End of Days" before it, "Bless the Child" invents its own "previously undiscovered" Biblical mythology to propel its story about a battle for the soul of an abandoned 6-year-old girl (Holliston Coleman) named Cody, who -- it is implied -- is the reincarnation of Christ.

Kim Basinger plays her aunt Maggie, a New York City psychiatric nurse who's strung-out younger sister (Angela Bettis, "Girl Interrupted") drops the infant girl on her doorstep and disappears. Maggie -- an agnostic, as all religious chiller heroes are at first -- raises Cody and gradually begins to realize (much more gradually than the audience) that the child has supernatural gifts. Rocking back and forth while ain't-it-eerie monk chants reverberate on the soundtrack, Cody makes plates spin with telekinetic power, lights candles just by staring at them intently and brings back to life pigeons that smack into windows.

Continue reading: Bless The Child Review

Kim Basinger

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Kim Basinger

Date of birth

8th December, 1953

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.71


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Kim Basinger Movies

Fifty Shades Freed Trailer

Fifty Shades Freed Trailer

They say that marriage can sometimes destroy a couple's sexual chemistry - but that is...

Fifty Shades Darker Trailer

Fifty Shades Darker Trailer

When Ana and Christian had their first fateful meeting, neither party knew much about the...

The Nice Guys Movie Review

The Nice Guys Movie Review

Writer-director Shane Black returns to the comedy-noir vibe of his 2005 hit Kiss Kiss Bang...

The Nice Guys - Green and Red Band Trailer

The Nice Guys - Green and Red Band Trailer

If you're on the wrong side of the law and looking for someone to send...

Black November Movie Review

Black November Movie Review

Nigerian filmmaker Jeta Amata clearly feels passionate about the problems in his country, but despite...

Third Person Movie Review

Third Person Movie Review

There are moments when this three-strand drama almost ascends to the emotional resonance of writer-director...

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Third Person Trailer

Third Person Trailer

Love is never uncomplicated and when a third person gets involved, it can make things...

Grudge Match Movie Review

Grudge Match Movie Review

It's a little annoying that this high-concept marketing project (Rocky vs Raging Bull!) is as...

Grudge Match Trailer

Grudge Match Trailer

In years gone by, Henry 'Razor' Sharp and Billy 'The Kid' McDonnen were at the...

Charlie St Cloud [aka Death & Life Of Charlie St Cloud] Movie Review

Charlie St Cloud [aka Death & Life Of Charlie St Cloud] Movie Review

Another solid performance by Zac Efron is flattened by bombastic filmmaking; this weepy drama couldn't...

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