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Universal Announces Release Date For 'Wicked' The Movie


Idina Menzel Kristin Chenoweth

Universal have finally announced the release date for the big screen adaptation of mega-popular Broadway show Wicked. The musical will hit theatres on Dec. 20, 2019, which coincidentally is the same date Disney has already announced for their as-yet-to-be-revealed live-action fairy-tale.

Continue reading: Universal Announces Release Date For 'Wicked' The Movie

Kristin Chenoweth - Kristin Chenoweth departs on a flight from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Lax, California, United States - Friday 26th February 2016

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Kristin Chenoweth - Universal Music Group's 2016 GRAMMY After Party - Arrivals at The Theatre At The Ace Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 15th February 2016

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Kristin Chenoweth - Universal Music Group's 2016 GRAMMY After Party held at The Theater at Ace Hotel - Arrivals at The Theater at Ace Hotel - Los Angeles - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 15th February 2016

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Kristin Chenoweth - Kristin Chenoweth arrives at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) wearing no make-up - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 12th February 2016

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Kristin Chenoweth
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Kristin Chenoweth

The Peanuts Movie Review

Very Good

Snoopy, Charlie Brown and friends finally arrive on the big screen in a movie that sticks close to the gently comical tone of the comic strip that launched in 1950 and the vintage TV shows from the 1960s and 1970s. Apart from whizzy digital animation, the film has the same stylised look and internalised storytelling. It's utterly charming, perhaps appealing more to nostalgic grown-ups than kids who aren't used to material that's so simple and sophisticated at the same time.

The story starts on the first snow day of winter, as Charlie Brown (voiced by Noah Schnapp) occupies his free time worrying about how he can reinvent himself to impress the red-haired girl (Francesca Angelucci Capaldi) who has just moved in across the street. He's certainly nervous enough without the constant torment of his pushy neighbour Lucy (Hadley Belle Miller) or his enterprising little sister Sally (Mariel Sheets), who works out ways to profit from Charlie's newly found celebrity when he aces a test at school. And then there's Charlie's faithful dog Snoopy (Bill Melendez), who is imagining a series of high-flying adventures in aerial dogfights against the Red Baron for the affections of a fluffy poodle (Kristin Chenoweth).

The animation style is sharp and enjoyably unfussy, playing with the characters' iconic figures without turning them into generic movie shapes. Best of all is the way their facial features retain a hand-drawn touch that echoes creator Charles Schulz's distinctly expressive imagery. There are also some wonderful animated line-art sequences. Meanwhile, the script is written by Schulz's son and grandson, maintaining the same sense of humour, with silly gags underscored by real emotions. At the centre are two things most kids (and adults) can instantly identify with: Charlie's crippling self-doubt and Snoopy's unfettered imagination. So even if some of the twists and turns of the story feel rather corny (including Snoopy's love interest and Charlie's instant fame), there's so much charm and soul that the film can't help but win us over.

Continue reading: The Peanuts Movie Review

Kristin Chenoweth - Kristin Chenoweth arrives at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) wearing ripped jeans, sunglasses and a pair of black leather gloves. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 4th November 2015

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Kristin Chenoweth - The 2015 Skin Cancer Foundation Gala at Mandarin Oriental New York - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 22nd October 2015

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Kristin Chenoweth - The Human Rights Hero Awards 2015 - Inside at Beso - Hollywood, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

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Kristin Chenoweth - The Human Rights Hero Awards 2015 presented by Marisol Nichols' Foundation for a Slavery Free World and Youth for Human Rights International at Beso - Inside at Beso - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

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Kristin Chenoweth
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Kristin Chenoweth - The Human Rights Hero Awards 2015 presented by Marisol Nichols' Foundation for a Slavery Free World and Youth for Human Rights International at Beso at Beso - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

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Kristin Chenoweth - Kristin Chenoweth goes shopping in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 19th August 2015

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Kristin Chenoweth - Kristin Chenoweth out and about in Beverly Hills running errands at beverly hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 13th August 2015

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Kristin Chenoweth - Kristin Chenoweth goes shopping in Beverly Hills holding hands with a female companion - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 12th August 2015

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Sofia Carson, Dove Cameron and Kristin Chenoweth - 'Descendants' premiere at Walt Disney Studios Main Theatre - Arrivals at Walt Disney Studios Main Theatre, Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 24th July 2015

Sofia Carson, Dove Cameron and Kristin Chenoweth
Sofia Carson, Dove Cameron and Kristin Chenoweth
Dove Cameron
Sofia Carson, Dove Cameron and Kristin Chenoweth
Dove Cameron
Dove Cameron

Kristin Chenoweth - Kristin Chenoweth Honored With Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame at ON THE HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME, Walk Of Fame - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 24th July 2015

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Kristin Chenoweth and Guests
Junie Chenoweth, Kristin Chenoweth and Jerry Chenoweth
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Kristin Chenoweth
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Dove Cameron and Kristin Chenoweth - 'Descendants' premiere at Walt Disney Studios Main Theatre - Arrivals at Walt Disney Studios Main Theatre, Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 24th July 2015

Dove Cameron and Kristin Chenoweth
Dove Cameron and Kristin Chenoweth
Kristin Chenoweth and Dove Cameron
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Dove Cameron

'Rio 2': Critics Squawk Their First Verdicts On The Colourful Kids' Comedy [Trailer]


Jesse Eisenberg Anne Hathaway Bruno Mars Jemaine Clement Kristin Chenoweth Andy Garcia

Don't you know about the bird? Well, Spix's Macaw to be precise and a new kids' movie that's bound to get you feeling in the mood for some summer sun and the Brazilian world cup. Rio 2 is currently out in the US and UK and picks up where its successful 2011 predecessor left off. But have critics given the new release the encouragement it needs to soar at the box office?

Rio 2 Jesse Eisenberg Anne Hathaway
It's Looking Pretty Good Box Office-Wise For 'Rio 2' This Weekend - If Only The Critics Could Be Convinced...

Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway reprise their roles as Blue and Jewel, two bright blue endangered who have settled into familial bliss since we last saw them. The news of more of their kind deep in the Amazon rainforest sends the itchy-footed Jewel reeling with excitement at the thought of moving to the wild.

Continue reading: 'Rio 2': Critics Squawk Their First Verdicts On The Colourful Kids' Comedy [Trailer]

Hollywood Game Night - A Glorified Game Of Charades?


Jane Lynch Fred Armisen Matthew Perry Kristen Bell Kristin Chenoweth Nick Cannon

At the tail end of her run as Mrs Hannigan in Annie, Jane Lynch is launching her brand new endeavor – Hollywood Game Night. It’s pretty much what it sounds like – a night of party games, banter and lots of competitive spirit. What makes this different to your average Friday night is that on this show, six of the eight contestants are celebrities.

Jane Lynch, Tony Awards
Jane Lynch loves a good game night.

When you have Fred Armisen and Matthew Perry competing in a mutant version of charades, it’s bound to be a funny experience, but what Lynch thinks is so special about this show is that the viewer at home gets to feel like part of the action – especially if they have a drink or two while watching Game Night. When she was asked by TIME Magazine whether contestants should come in caffeinated, Lynch answered: “Or slightly tipsy. Either way” In one promo she even suggests that viewers at home invent a make a drinking game out of watching the show.

Continue reading: Hollywood Game Night - A Glorified Game Of Charades?

Hit and Run Trailer


When Charlie Bronson, a bank robbery getaway driver on a witness protection programme, jeopardizes his life to take his beloved fiancée to Los Angeles, his past comes knocking at his door in the form of his old best friends who want their money after being released from an 8 month prison sentence. Charlie's abrupt escape leads to a frenzied sequence of car chases involving his former friends, gangsters and the police, not to mention Charlie's fiancée's shock and rage at finding out that he hasn't been honest with her.

Continue: Hit and Run Trailer

Hit and Run - Trailer Trailer


Video - Kristin Chenoweth Leaves Dentists, Denies Having Toothache


Actress and singer Kristin Chenoweth (Bewitched; The Pink Panther; Glee) walking back to her car with a friend after visiting her dentist's office. She laughs when asked if she had a toothache and talks to the photographers before heading back to her car.

Kristin is set to star in the 2012 action comedy Outrun, alongside Bradley Cooper and Kristin Bell. She will also star in Family Weekend, also to be released in 2012, alongside Matthew Modine and High School Musical's Olesya Rulin

Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue Trailer


Tinker Bell just can't help herself when it comes to exploring. Whilst on the mainland Tink's tricks land her in more trouble than usual when she is discovered by a little girl. Vidia and the other fairies lead a brave rescue mission to save Tink and take her back to safety. As Tink's bond grows stronger with the little girl the strong fairy decides she's going to risk everything and help the little girl reconnect with her father who's often very distant.

Continue: Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue Trailer

Space Chimps Review


Bad
There are many concepts that work wonderfully in theory: communism, nuclear energy, monkeys in outer space. Sadly, just like their theoretical counterparts, very few successful practical examples exist. With a title like Space Chimps, one assumes a genial farce in which accident prone apes -- opposable thumbs and all -- cause chaos within a high tech setting. Instead, Quest for Camelot scribe Kirk De Micco (here co-writing and directing) decides to go the big screen blockbuster route. We want simian hijinks. Instead, we're offered staid adventure with messages about courage, self-esteem, and living up to your potential. Boo!

When an expensive space probe goes missing, a surly Senator (voice of Stanley Tucci) with a key to NASA's funding wants it found. It's decided that, instead of a manned mission, a trio of chimps will be sent to fetch it. They include the macho Titan (Patrick Warburton), the level headed Luna (Cheryl Hines), and in a perfect PR move, the great grandson of the first ape-stronaut ever, Ham III (Andy Samberg). One wormhole later, our hirsute heroes find themselves on a distant alien planet ruled by the evil dictator Zartog (Jeff Daniels). He is using the lost Earth satellite to control his unhappy minions. It's up to the primates to find a way of defeating the villain and getting back home before it's too late.

Continue reading: Space Chimps Review

Deck The Halls Review


Bad
While watching Deck the Halls, my wife wondered aloud when the last good Christmas movie came out. (We eventually settled on A Christmas Story in 1983.) And while there may be passable Christmas movies released since then, Deck the Halls certainly isn't one of them. It's really quite the opposite.

Poor Matthew Broderick, normally so reliable, gets sucked into the nonsense here in short order. He's Steve Finch, a small-town optometrist and generally good guy, but when Buddy Hall (Danny DeVito), a car salesman, comes to town, his world is quickly upended. Buddy decides he won't rest until his home is visible from space, so he sets out to prove his non-loserness by setting up an absurdly elaborate light show on his house across the street from Steve. This thrills the locals but annoys Steve, and a rivalry develops in typical movie fashion. Steve tries to knock out Buddy's power with fireworks. Buddy responds by adding a blaring audio track to the light show.

Continue reading: Deck The Halls Review

The West Wing: Season Six Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Season Six Review

Running With Scissors Review


OK
In a game effort to deflect the immediate suspicions of most viewers likely to be mistrustful of its all-too-convenient cast of wildly entertaining eccentrics, the young boy narrating Running with Scissors acknowledges, somewhat ruefully, early on that "nobody's going to believe me anyway." It's a smart maneuver, given what follows in this overly energetic adaptation of Augusten Burroughs' bestselling 2002 memoir about growing up in the 1970s with a mentally damaged mother who sent him off to be raised by her psychiatrist in his house of David Lynch-ian strangeness. As it stands, Running with Scissors is best taken as a literary memoir and not judged on its complete veracity but whether it works as a story of flawed people in an environment that seems to cater to all their worst impulses. It almost does.

The film opens in 1972, showing a young Augusten as an audience of one for his mother Deirdre's in-home poetry reading, microphone and all. The bilious, self-aggrandizing manner with which Deirdre (Annette Bening) gives her reading tells you pretty much all you need to know about the opinion she holds as to her place in the world and any who may disagree. Any remaining questions about her fitfulness as a mother are answered when the film jumps to its primary setting in the late '70s, where Deirdre has become a whirling dervish of arrogant fury and spite. Her obsessive belief that she is an important poet being kept from her rightful place at the center of the literary firmament drives away first Augusten's father (Alec Baldwin, lightly soused) and then Augusten, whom she decides would be better off living with her exceedingly unorthodox psychiatrist, Dr. Finch (Brian Cox). A devout and at least partially mad Freudian of the most unrecondite sort, Finch keeps a special room next to his doctor's office which he calls The Masturbatorium and divines the future from the shape of his bowel movements. Seemingly he's not much of a father figure.

Continue reading: Running With Scissors Review

Running With Scissors Trailer


From day one, Ryan Murphy has kept me involved. People had warned me, "Once you option your book, it's out of your hands." I was like, "Good. Go, take it away, make it pretty. Call me when I have to buy a tux." 

Continue: Running With Scissors Trailer

Running With Scissors Review


OK
In a game effort to deflect the immediate suspicions of most viewers likely to be mistrustful of its all-too-convenient cast of wildly entertaining eccentrics, the young boy narrating Running with Scissors acknowledges, somewhat ruefully, early on that "nobody's going to believe me anyway." It's a smart maneuver, given what follows in this overly energetic adaptation of Augusten Burroughs' bestselling 2002 memoir about growing up in the 1970s with a mentally damaged mother who sent him off to be raised by her psychiatrist in his house of David Lynch-ian strangeness. As it stands, Running with Scissors is best taken as a literary memoir and not judged on its complete veracity but whether it works as a story of flawed people in an environment that seems to cater to all their worst impulses. It almost does.The film opens in 1972, showing a young Augusten as an audience of one for his mother Deirdre's in-home poetry reading, microphone and all. The bilious, self-aggrandizing manner with which Deirdre (Annette Bening) gives her reading tells you pretty much all you need to know about the opinion she holds as to her place in the world and any who may disagree. Any remaining questions about her fitfulness as a mother are answered when the film jumps to its primary setting in the late '70s, where Deirdre has become a whirling dervish of arrogant fury and spite. Her obsessive belief that she is an important poet being kept from her rightful place at the center of the literary firmament drives away first Augusten's father (Alec Baldwin, lightly soused) and then Augusten, whom she decides would be better off living with her exceedingly unorthodox psychiatrist, Dr. Finch (Brian Cox). A devout and at least partially mad Freudian of the most unrecondite sort, Finch keeps a special room next to his doctor's office which he calls The Masturbatorium and divines the future from the shape of his bowel movements. Seemingly he's not much of a father figure.Once it deposits the relatively colorless Augusten (Joseph Cross) in the house, the film throws an abundance of vivid characters at us, from Finch's pet-food-eating wife Agnes (Jill Clayburgh) to his daughters -- best described as the slutty one (Evan Rachel Wood) and the religious one (Gwyneth Paltrow) -- and the definitely insane son (Joseph Fiennes, uncomfortably bad) who starts an affair with the far-too-young Augusten. But the film is unable to make them much more than cartoon characters in Finch's filthy, falling-down house of oddities where dead cats receive full burials and pharmaceuticals are handed out like Pez.Writer/director Ryan Murphy (Nip/Tuck) knows that the material in his hands has the potential for humor, that queasy kind of if-you-don't-laugh-you'll-cry sort of funny which Burroughs uses as a coping device in his writing. What works in the book, however, comes off on film as shallow and mocking; we're laughing at these damaged people. Murphy scores too many scenes with well-worn and not terribly appropriate '70s pop chestnuts, playing it all for the easy punchline, making the film too often a shallow exercise in retro camp.There are, nevertheless, two reasons to see Running with Scissors, and they are Bening and Cox. Bening could well be accused of shamelessly going for the Oscar with her full-throttle and stage-clearing performance, but given the fearsomely focused pathos that results, it's hard to complain. Cox is as always the consummate professional who underplays as everyone else overplays, finding the sly humor and magisterial authority at the heart of his unapologetically crude patriarch. Although playing self-absorbed narcissists of the worst kind, given the half-formed caricatures flitting around them, Bening and Cox make their characters by far the film's most endearing; not a good sign for everyone else involved.And take your plate to the kitchen, too.

R.V. Review


OK
Bob Munro (Robin Williams) has reached a difficult intersection on the road of life. Once, he played hero to his daughter Cassie (Joanna "JoJo" Levesque). Now she's an iPod-sporting, disgruntled teenager who'd rather hang with Osama bin Laden than dear old dad. Bob seeks support from wife Jamie (Cheryl Hines) and son Carl (Josh Hutcherson), though his efforts are met by blank stares.

Bob's work situation isn't much better. As the former golden employee inches closer to retirement, he's forced to look over his shoulder at the younger, hungrier competition eager to please a selfish, credit-hogging boss (Will Arnett). Bob seeks support from his coworkers, and finds those familiar blank stares.

Continue reading: R.V. Review

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

Bewitched Review


Weak
Campy-revamp remakes and Nicole Kidman just don't mix.

But the problem is not the actress's performances. Sheadded bite and ironic melodiousness to last year's slapdash, self-destructing"TheStepford Wives," and she keeps the newself-aware, big-screen version of "Bewitched" afloat with herdelightful spark of perky naivete as a witch trying to live a mortal life.She has a deftly silly sense of comedic balance and timing.

The problem is, when she's just looking to have some funbetween dramatic roles, the girl can't pick a script.

Like "The Stepford Wives," this new comedy isa mess at the screenplay level. It changes mood, direction and (like "Wives")the rules of its own reality in every other scene. The plot is sloppy andstructurally unsound. Fictional characters from the original "Bewitched"come to life in single scenes for no explored reason ("The Daily Show's"Steve Carell is bloody awful as queeny Uncle Arthur) -- and this happenseven though the bulk of the meta-cinema plot takes place in real-worldHollywood. You see, Kidman plays an actual witch who becomes an actressand gets cast as TV sorceress Samantha Stevens in a network remake of thetitular 1960s sitcom.

Continue reading: Bewitched Review

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Kristin Chenoweth Movies

My Little Pony: The Movie [2017] Trailer

My Little Pony: The Movie [2017] Trailer

Princess Twilight Sparkle lives in the beautiful land of Equestria; a land of rainbows and...

The Peanuts Movie Movie Review

The Peanuts Movie Movie Review

Snoopy, Charlie Brown and friends finally arrive on the big screen in a movie that...

The Boy Next Door Movie Review

The Boy Next Door Movie Review

A cheesy TV movie ramped up with language and violence, this sudsy thriller is far...

Strange Magic Trailer

Strange Magic Trailer

In a magical world of fairies and goblins, two worlds live secluded from each other,...

The Boy Next Door Trailer

The Boy Next Door Trailer

Life is complicated enough for teacher, Claire (Jennifer Lopez). Her husband, Kevin (Ian Nelson) is...

Rio 2 Movie Review

Rio 2 Movie Review

After the snappy, clever 2011 original, this sequel feels rather lazy by comparison: it's still...

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Rio 2 Trailer

Rio 2 Trailer

Blu and Jewel believe that they are two of a kind as the only full...

Rio 2 Trailer

Rio 2 Trailer

Blu and Jewel's babies are growing up fast and developing an eagerness to learn about...

Rio 2 Trailer

Rio 2 Trailer

Blu and Jewel live as an idyllic life as any blue macaw could wish for,...

Family Weekend Trailer

Family Weekend Trailer

Emily Smith-Dungy is a 16-year-old super high achieving student with a great passion for jumping...

Hit & Run Movie Review

Hit & Run Movie Review

Audiences out for a bit of mindless fun will probably enjoy this raucous road movie,...

Hit and Run Trailer

Hit and Run Trailer

When Charlie Bronson, a bank robbery getaway driver on a witness protection programme, jeopardizes his...

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