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Biff! Kapow! Shia LeBeouf Takes A British Beating After Filming Drunks


Shia LaBeouf Lars Von Trier

Shia LeBeouf, you’re an idiot. Leicester Sq. on a busy, drunken evening isn’t the place to start filming intoxicated locals. It just isn’t. You’ll end up with a fist in your face, and that’s exactly what happened to the cocky Hollywood film star, who recently appeared smoking in a mass poster release for Lars Von Trier’s Nymphomaniac.

Nymphomaniac
Charlotte Gainsbourh, Shia LaBeouf, Stacy Martin and Jamie Bell

If the picture above was a line up, and the police asked, ‘alright, which one of these guys got beaten up for being arrogant and ignorant?’ it would be pretty easy to pick one out, wouldn’t it?

Continue reading: Biff! Kapow! Shia LeBeouf Takes A British Beating After Filming Drunks

So, Did Shia LaBeouf Drop Acid For 'The Necessary Death Of Charlie Countryman?'


Shia LaBeouf Sean Penn Lars Von Trier

Remember last year when we reported Shia LaBeouf had dropped acid for 24 hours to prepare for a role in The Necessary Death of Charlie Countryman? At the time, the 26-year-old told USA Today that he wanted to deliver a realistic rendering of a scene in which he character trips on LSD. "There's a way to do an acid trip like Harold & Kumar, and there's a way to be on acid," he said. "What I know of acting, Sean Penn actually strapped up to that (electric) chair in Dead Man Walking. These are the guys that I look up to," he said.

Well, the movie - which tells the story of a young man who heads to Romania after the death of his mother - premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this week. MTV News caught up with the actor to clear up the acid story, asking, "The character drops acid and you did that for the role. You did it because you wanted to be in that headspace, apparently?" LaBeouf appeared to go into detail about the process of preparing for a scene with the use of drugs, "I'd never done acid before. I remember sending Evan tapes. I remember trying to conjure this and sending tapes. And Evan being like 'That's good, but that's not but, that is," adding, "You reach out to friends and gauge where you're at. I was sending tapes around and I'd get 50 percents from people and that just starts creeping me out. I was getting really nervous toward the end. Not cause I wanted to be on drugs - I'm not trying to mess with the set or anything like that. It's really just fear that propels people."

LaBeouf was also reported to have drunk real moonshine to prepare for the gangster drama Lawless and was expected to film real sex scene for Lars Von Trier's Nymphomaniac before the idea was scrapped. Following its Sundance screening, The Necessary Death of Charlie Countryman courted positive reviews, with The Hollywood Reporter saying, "LaBeouf projects a degree of emotional recklessness that's both disarming and disconcerting to watch." 

Continue reading: So, Did Shia LaBeouf Drop Acid For 'The Necessary Death Of Charlie Countryman?'

Melancholia Review


Excellent
Von Trier continues to challenge audiences with his bold, bleak storytelling.

As always, he creates a stunning visual film experience full of raw, wrenching performances. And he tackles themes that are so big that we're not quite sure what to make of it in the end.

Justine (Dunst) is feeling a bit detached on the day of her wedding to the doting Michael (Alexander Skarsgard), and her brother-in-law John (Sutherland) is annoyed that she's not enjoying the expensive party he's staging. Her sister Claire (Gainsbourg) is more understanding, even when events take a few strange turns. Later, the shattered Justine will become the voice of reason when the planet Melancholia, which has been hiding behind the sun, heads towards Earth in a dramatic fly-by. Now it's Claire who's overwhelmed with moodiness, fearing for her young son (Spurr).

Continue reading: Melancholia Review

Melancholia Trailer


In a grand castle located in the beautiful countryside, Justine and Michael have married. They enter their reception to cheers and applause and everyone agrees that Justine has never looked happier or more beautiful. The newlyweds enjoy their new marital status and the company of their guests, which include Justine's sister Claire and her husband, John, who organised and paid for the entire wedding.

Continue: Melancholia Trailer

Antichrist Review


Very Good
Von Trier is a filmmaking genius, but this will challenge even his faithful fans. The expert direction, editing and photography are all here, along with two amazing performances. But this warped Adam and Eve myth is seriously hard to stomach.

After the accidental death of their young son, a couple (Dafoe and Gainsbourg) struggles to cope with their anguish. As a therapist, he offers to help her come to terms with the heartache that has landed her in hospital. But when they head to Eden, their isolated woodland getaway, the grief turns to pain and despair, and all of nature seems to conspire against their recovery. This eerily echoes her thesis on female nature, as events take a turn that's feral and terrifyingly gruesome.

Continue reading: Antichrist Review

The Kingdom (1994) Review


Excellent
This is what would happen if you let David Lynch loose on the set of ER with nothing but a TV camera, a gaggle of Danish actors, and a bone saw. The Kingdom, an extremely ambitious effort for both the filmmakers and the audience, is Denmark's hipper-than-thou answer to Twin Peaks.

I'm not even going to attempt to explain the plot of The Kingdom, as it could fill several pages and still not make a lick of sense. I'll leave it at this: "The Kingdom" is a giant Copenhagen hospital, and every single room in it (and most of the corridors, and the driveway, and the parking lot) contains at least one complete wacko.

Continue reading: The Kingdom (1994) Review

The Boss Of It All Review


Good
Lars von Trier seems like a smart fellow and to that end, I don't believe a word he says; at least not at face value. So, when he opens a film, in deconstructionist manor, with a proclamation that there is nothing up his sleeve and that he is trying to make a simple comedy, one can mull it over for a bit before realizing the man couldn't make a simple movie if he was handed the blueprints.

Ironically enough, the blueprints are handed straight to the audience: Von Trier's latest, The Boss of It All, basically lays out an office comedy while simultaneously instructing the audience on how a modern comedy should be made. Intermittently sprinkled through the narrative, von Trier's narration comes in to warn us of a change in plot that is "necessary," starting off falsely aloof and ending hopelessly irate. The man can't help himself.

Continue reading: The Boss Of It All Review

The Kingdom II Review


Excellent
5 more hours and 4 more episodes of The Kingdom... I love it! And it keeps getting better. Check out our review of the first 4 episodes of this Danish TV event that makes stateside television look pathetic, uninspired, and just plain stupid in comparison. Can't wait for (what I believe to be) the last 4 episodes.

In Danish and Swedish with subtitles.

Continue reading: The Kingdom II Review

Dear Wendy Review


Terrible
For the most part, 2005 was a great year for movies about something. I won't go through all the titles, but it was obvious that for once in a very long time, directors were good and angry. So, it comes as a large disappointment that Thomas Vinterberg's Dear Wendy fails to get away from its own self-masturbatory America-is-stupid letterhead of war as a means of peace. Gee, I wonder if Vinterberg and screenwriter Lars Von Trier are talking about Bush's "war for peace" and America's botched pacifism.

Set in the unidentifiable town known as Estherslope in some unknown time (confusing since there is a huge Axe deodorant spray advertisement in one scene), Dick (Jamie Bell) lives with his miner father and Clarabelle (Novella Nelson), the family maid. He takes a job at a supermarket and generally acts lonely constantly, especially when his father dies in the mines. At the supermarket, he meets Steven (Mark Webber), a young man exactly like him. Things light up between them when Steven sees Dick with a small gun that Dick thinks is a toy; it isn't. They begin to meet, and slowly form the Dandies, a gang of people who love guns but never use them. All is well in their lives until the sheriff (Bill Pullman) puts Dick in charge of checking in on Clarabelle's grandson, Sebastian (Danso Gordon), a small-time murderer. Sebastian takes liberties with Dick's gun (the titular Wendy) and, well, things don't end well.

Continue reading: Dear Wendy Review

The Kingdom Review


Excellent
This is what would happen if you let David Lynch loose on the set of ER with nothing but a TV camera, a gaggle of Danish actors, and a bone saw. The Kingdom, an extremely ambitious effort for both the filmmakers and the audience, is Denmark's hipper-than-thou answer to Twin Peaks.

I'm not even going to attempt to explain the plot of The Kingdom, as it could fill several pages and still not make a lick of sense. I'll leave it at this: "The Kingdom" is a giant Copenhagen hospital, and every single room in it (and most of the corridors, and the driveway, and the parking lot) contains at least one complete wacko.

Continue reading: The Kingdom Review

Breaking The Waves Review


Very Good
Lars von Trier knows weird and creepy. In northern Scotland, a woman (Watson) pines away in prayer for her husband (Skarsgård), who is offshore on an oil rig. When he is knocked into vegetable-land in an accident, he asks her to have sex with other men since he is unable to do so. Things get more and more deviant, while Watson's religious fervor gets more and more pronounced. Keep your eyes open -- despite an ass-numbing length (just shy of 3 hours), Watson's Oscar-nominated performance and a goose-bump-raising tale make Breaking the Waves a rare creepfest.

The Five Obstructions Review


Excellent
Anyone who makes art knows that creativity is born from limitations. The Five Obstructions idealizes this notion. Danish provocateur Lars von Trier makes a challenge to his old film professor (and renowned experimental filmmaker) Jørgen Leth: Remake his poetic 1967 short film The Perfect Human five times, according to arbitrary (and sometimes, in Leth's words, "satanic" or "diabolical") rules concocted by von Trier. The Five Obstructions is a documentary about Leth making those five remakes, filtered through von Trier's rules.

Ever since Breaking the Waves, von Trier has been imposing his own self-made limitations on his movies with varying levels of success. Indeed, he comes off in The Five Obstructions as the bad guy, a carefully cultivated image that's more annoying because it's so calculated. Von Trier's sadistic glee is the least interesting part of Obstructions, and Leth is the more compelling subject: an artist grappling with the art of making movies. When faced with the first obstruction-- where no clip must last more than 12 frames, the movie must be shot in Cuba, the questions posed by Leth's experimental short must be answered, and so on -- Leth creates a vivid, collage-poem where the 12 frame structure creates beautiful, dreamlike swirls of movement and daring editing jumps. When faced with Leth's stunning and beautiful completed work, von Trier seethes in mock exasperation: "The 12 frames were a gift!"

Continue reading: The Five Obstructions Review

Medea Review


Weak
Weird, to say the least, Lars von Trier's 75-minute Medea is a retelling of the tragic myth of Jason (of the Argonauts fame) and his sorceress girlfriend Medea. The cryptic tale is an exercise in long takes and roundabout dialogue, where every character speaks in riddles. Don't expect to learn much about Greek mythology, though some of the imagery in the film is quite haunting.

Epidemic Review


OK
In this film, two contemporary, young Danish men (played by Epidemic's screenwriter Niels Vørsel and writer/director Lars von Trier) set out, under pressure from their prospective producers and under a killing deadline, to write a screenplay about the title ailment, a mysterious and highly contagious illness characterized chiefly by the horrible, bloody demise it brings about within days. In that film, which we're treated to in doses, an idealistic young doctor named Mesmer sets out from the unnamed, sometime-in-the-20th-century, and still uninfected City for the outlying Infected Areas to provide treatment for those already afflicted. Fate plays an awful trick on our filmmakers, though: as work progresses on their film, an actual epidemic sweeps Europe, one strangely like that about which they're writing.

You know from the start that all will not turn out well; among the first scenes is a tour of the filmmakers' apartment in which the furniture is upended and the walls are smeared with blood. 1988's Epidemic chronicles the fateful few days in which the apartment's inhabitants simultaneously complete their film treatment and succumb to this plague.

Continue reading: Epidemic Review

The Element Of Crime Review


Good
Before he decided camera trickery was actually a bad thing (in re his Dogme 95 movement), Lars von Trier couldn't get enough of it -- as is evident in his first English-language feature, The Element of Crime. A twisted tale of a cop who undergoes a hypnotic treatment in order to track down a serial killer of young girls, Crime is shot under almost exclusively red lighting, giving the impression that you are seeing the film through a haze of blood.

This is interesting for five minutes, but after 105 it gets tedious to an extreme. It also makes it extremely difficult to actually see what's going on -- not only is everything red, but the whole film is shot at night and almost all of it in the rain.

Continue reading: The Element Of Crime Review

The Kingdom II Review


Excellent
5 more hours and 4 more episodes of The Kingdom... I love it! And it keeps getting better. Check out our review of the first 4 episodes of this Danish TV event that makes stateside television look pathetic, uninspired, and just plain stupid in comparison. Can't wait for (what I believe to be) the last 4 episodes.

In Danish and Swedish with subtitles.

Continue reading: The Kingdom II Review

Manderlay Review


Very Good
You should be very suspicious of anyone who owns Dogville and no other Lars Von Trier film. It's a ruse, a hoax, and a ploy, a way for that pretentious NYU philosophy major with the vintage Members Only jacket to impress that really cool, semi-punk girl with the cool Husker Du pin and prove to her that his brain is much more worthy than anyone else's. To like Dogville alone is to like the idea of Von Trier and to think you're special for picking up all the philosophical ideas behind it, along with name-checking Brecht. You're not, and Breaking the Waves, Dancer in the Dark, and The Element of Crime are much better films. Expect a copy of his latest film, Manderlay, Dogville's sequel, to be placed on that NYU kid's DVD shelf right next to Dogville, allowing for more philosophical meandering but this time, on racism and white, liberal guilt.

Picking up after the violent ending of Dogville, we catch up with Grace Mulligan (Bryce Dallas Howard, replacing Nicole Kidman) as her and her father (Willem Dafoe, replacing James Caan) end up at a small southern plantation named Manderlay. A young, black woman runs up to the car, yelling and crying about how they are going to whip Timothy (Isaach De Bankole). Stopping the car immediately and running onto the plantation, against her father's wishes, she finds that Manderlay is a plantation that still employs slavery. Seeing this as a grave injustice, Grace takes a few of her father's goons and starts running the plantation more like a business, making the white owners work while the slaves are given freedom to go about as they please, receiving shares in the crop's revenue. The slaves are led by Willhelm (Danny Glover), an older man who used to serve Mam (Lauren Bacall), the head of the plantation. As things progress, a dust storm, a child's death, the execution of an elder and Grace's slowly unraveling lust for Timothy start raising the issue that maybe things were better as they were.

Continue reading: Manderlay Review

Dancer In The Dark Review


Excellent
Early on in Dancer in the Dark, Peter Stormare confesses to Björk that he doesn't understand movie musicals, because all the characters suddenly start singing and dancing for no reason. He doesn't start singing and dancing for no reason, he says.

Selma, as played to perfection by the almost childlike Björk, does her share of singing and dancing, but she's got a reason: It's all in her head. And with that said, get ready for the creepiest, most depressing, and certainly the most unique movie musical ever put on film.

Continue reading: Dancer In The Dark Review

Dogville Review


Good
Evoking the age-old parable of human nature pillaging the likes of total goodness when it strangely pops up in town, Lars von Trier's much-anticipated Dogville has such intense extremes of useful experimentation and annoyingly repetitive patronization (a tendency throughout his respectable filmography) that the sum of its parts comes out evenly average.

Predictability reigns for much of the film, because we've seen the story far too often before. A stranger comes to town where the residents are skeptical of outsiders. She proceeds to go out of her way to ingratiate herself, they finally accept her, and then show their true colors against her of what they fear to inflict on one another due to extended co-habitation. The dysfunction turns into a gang of all versus one, regardless of any normal sense of morality, which they are able to slowly rationalize. On the one hand, the unhurried process through which this evolves respects the fact that nobody changes actions or views over night. But because we know it's going to happen, the path to getting there feels arduous.

Continue reading: Dogville Review

The Idiots Review


Essential
Why would a group of upstanding citizens of the middle class decide to meet in a large country house and get in touch with their inner idiot?

These young people are in a continual training process to get in touch with what they describe as their "inner idiot", allowing themselves to lapse into behavior outside of the constrictions imposed by a society obsessed with a mask of etiquette.

Continue reading: The Idiots Review

Zentropa Review


Good
Lars von Trier has never been known for making movies that are on the nose. In general, you're left to your own devices when it comes to figuring out what the hell is going on in The Kingdom or The Element of Crime. Zentropa is no exception, an inspired but devilishly confusing look at an American who takes a job on a German railroad -- in postwar 1945. Soon enough he's caught up in a mystery, a seeming pawn as a would-be terrorist, stuck between the Americans and the daughter of the railroad-owning magnate -- who winds up dead. Von Trier tries to emulate the work of Hitchcock like Notorious, but the suspense level never rises above a low simmer. Heavy on style (though budget constraints shine through from time to time) but a bit more than short on substance.

Continue reading: Zentropa Review

The Five Obstructions Review


Excellent

An eccentric and intrepid testament to the pure joy of cinema, "The Five Obstructions" is what happens when one of the world's most audacious filmmakers -- Las von Trier, founder of the minimalist Dogme95 movement and director of "Breaking the Waves," "Dancer in the Dark" and "Dogville" -- decides to challenge his artistic mentor to a duel of intellect and imagination.

The semi-documentary begins with a simple conversation between von Trier and prolific Danish writer-director Jorgen Leth, in which the student presents his one-time teacher with a challenge too thought-provoking to refuse: Leth is to direct five remakes of his 1967 short "The Perfect Human," and for each version von Trier will impose creative restrictions to see if the filmmaker can rise to the occasion.

Leth, a kindly, long-faced intellectual in his 60s, enters into the agreement enthusiastically but almost immediately comes to realize he's made a deal with the devil. The childish, egotistical von Trier delights in tormenting him with what seem like increasingly impossible hurdles.

Continue reading: The Five Obstructions Review

Lars Von Trier

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Lars Von Trier

Date of birth

30th April, 1956

Occupation

Filmmaker

Sex

Male

Height

1.70




Lars Von Trier Movies

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

Joe is a fiercely determined 50-year-old woman whose sexual drive has taken over her entire...

Nymphomaniac: Volume 1 Trailer

Nymphomaniac: Volume 1 Trailer

Joe has always known she's been completely obsessed with sex ever since she was a...

Nymphomaniac Movie Review

Nymphomaniac Movie Review

At four hours long, this drama is as confrontational as anything we've seen by Lars...

Melancholia Movie Review

Melancholia Movie Review

Von Trier continues to challenge audiences with his bold, bleak storytelling. As always, he creates...

Melancholia Trailer

Melancholia Trailer

In a grand castle located in the beautiful countryside, Justine and Michael have married. They...

Antichrist Movie Review

Antichrist Movie Review

Von Trier is a filmmaking genius, but this will challenge even his faithful fans. The...

The Boss Of It All Trailer

The Boss Of It All Trailer

The Boss Of It AllTrailerLars Von Trier - who many describe as the king of...

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The Boss of It All Movie Review

The Boss of It All Movie Review

Lars von Trier seems like a smart fellow and to that end, I don't believe...

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