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Nocturnal Animals Trailer


For a short time, Edward and Susan had a happy marriage, they lived in a nice neighbourhood, Susan had a good career and Edward was not far from taking the bar. Susan lives a fast-paced life and as such barely sleeps and Edward would somewhat affectionately tell her that she's a 'nocturnal animal'.

25 years later, Susan has remarried a serial philanderer and her life is far from happy. Unexpectedly a manuscript arrives at her door titled 'Nocturnal Animals' and with the dedication to 'Susan'. She pushes the pages aside and decides to leave them but eventually she can't help but start to read the book that she inspired Edward to write.

The story that unfolds is an incredibly dark tale of murder and revenge and Susan is shocked and traumatised that she would play such a pivotal role in the creation of such a dark piece of work. Susan's interpretation and retelling of the story soon impacts on her life and is unsure how Edward's return into her life will turn out.

Continue: Nocturnal Animals Trailer

Sully Trailer


Chesley Sullenberger has been a pilot all of his adult life. Having had an interest in planes from a young age, Sully decided to join the United States Air Force Academy where he became a 'top flyer' in his class. From his initial position as a cadet, he worked his way up the ranks be become a captain. His astute knowledge of planes was one of the reasons why he was also part of an accident investigation board.

After leaving the air force, he began work at American Airways, whilst also keeping up his interest in aircraft safety. On January 15, 2009 sully began work as usual, travelling to LaGuardia Airport for a flight to Charlotte. The bags were loaded, the passengers seated and the checks completed as it was time for take-off.

As Sully and his co-pilot, Jeff Skiles, initiate the take-off procedure, there was nothing to make either think that this wouldn't be a straightforward shuttle flight. As the wheels took off and the plane lifted from the ground, the plane is suddenly thrown into chaos as a flock of geese fly into the plane and cause serious malfunctions in both engines.

Continue: Sully Trailer

Genius Trailer


Thomas Wolfe was a writer who was used to rejection. His constantly lengthy novels didn't seem to appeal to the vast majority of publishers out there and most editors were fazed by his compulsion to write hundreds of pages.

Not willing to give up on his talent, Wolfe send his pages to Maxwell Perkins, the man who originally published Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. When Thomas is summoned to Maxwell's office, he presumes he's once again about to be told that he's been unsuccessful but the chance to meet a man who's had so much literary influence is too much to pass up. The meeting begins as Wolfe thinks it would but he's soon informed by Perkins that the company will take on Wolfe's latest book.

Wolfe and Perkins form a close relationship, Wolfe still delivering copious amounts of words and Perkins seemingly the only man capable of editing them.  As their personal and professional relationship deepens, Perkins is taken in more and more by the acclaimed genius.

Continue: Genius Trailer

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2: Out Of The Shadows Trailer


Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael are back in full force and ready to protect their beloved home town of Manhattan, this time the brothers are equipped with their fully loaded Tartaruga wagon and nothing will stop them from fighting the bad guys they face, in their own words: "We're just four brothers who hate bullies and love this city."

Once again the team is joined by the feisty April O'Neil and this time the Turtles mission is bigger than ever. When a mad scientist by the name of Dr. Baxter Stockman, creates a new form of mutagen, chaos is released all over the city in part due Shredder's two new henchmen, Bebop & Rocksteady and a much bigger mechanical Alien invasion which will see the turtles step out of the shadows and take the spotlight to save their city.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out Of The Shadows will be released 16 June 2016 and was once again directed by Dave Green.

Laura Linney - Women In Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Laura Linney
Laura Linney
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Laura Linney and Toni Howard
Laura Linney and Toni Howard

Laura Linney - Women in Film Crystal and Lucy Awards 2015 - Arrivals at Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Laura Linney
Laura Linney
Laura Linney and Toni Howard
Laura Linney and Toni Howard

Laura Linney - Women In Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Laura Linney
Laura Linney
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Laura Linney

Sir Ian McKellan and Laura Linney - The UK premiere of 'Mr Holmes' - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 10th June 2015

Sir Ian Mckellan and Laura Linney
Sir Ian Mckellan
Sir Ian Mckellan
Sir Ian Mckellan
Sir Ian Mckellan
Sir Ian Mckellan

Laura Linney - Mr Holmes UK premiere held at the Odeon Kensington - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 10th June 2015

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Laura Linney
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Laura Linney

Laura Linney - UK premiere of 'Mr. Holmes' at the Odeon Kensington in London - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 10th June 2015

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Laura Linney
Sir Ian Mckellen and Laura Linney
Sir Ian Mckellen and Laura Linney
Sir Ian Mckellen and Laura Linney
Sir Ian Mckellen and Laura Linney

Laura Linney - Laura Linney outside the ITV Studios - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 10th June 2015

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Laura Linney
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Laura Linney
Laura Linney

Laura Linney - 65th Berlin International Film Festival - 'Mr Holmes' - Premiere - Berlin, Germany - Sunday 8th February 2015

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Laura Linney
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Laura Linney

Ian McKellen, Milo Parker and Laura Linney - 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - 'Mr. Holmes' -Photocall - - Sunday 8th February 2015

Ian Mckellen, Milo Parker and Laura Linney
Ian Mckellen
Ian Mckellen
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Ian Mckellen
Ian Mckellen

Laura Linney - Celebrities attends the premiere for "Mr.Holmes" at the Berlinale Palaste in Berlin. - Berlin, Germany - Sunday 8th February 2015

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Laura Linney
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Primetime Emmy Awards 2013: How Accurate Were Nomination Predictions?


Emmy Awards Sofia Vergara Kevin Spacey Toby Jones Neil Patrick Harris Maggie Smith Helen Mirren Netflix Paul Aaron Kate Mara Adam Driver Ed O'Neill Bobby Cannavale Mandy Patinkin Jim Carter Al Pacino Peter Dinklage Michael Douglas Matt Damon Anna Gunn Alec Baldwin Matt Le Blanc Jason Bateman Bill Hader Tony Hale Julie Bowen Kerry Washington Claire Danes Connie Britton Jon Hamm Damian Lewis Jeff Daniels Emilia Clarke Christina Hendricks Benedict Cumberbatch Laura Linney Jessica Lange Game Of Thrones

The Primetime Emmy Award nominations were announced yesterday (Thursday 18th July). The nomination ceremony was presented by Kate Mara and Aaron Paul via a live video stream on the Emmy's website. 

Kate Mara
Kate Mara at the Vanity Fair and Juicy Couture's Celebration of 2013 in L.A.

Netflix has managed to triumph with nominations for their shows: House of Cards; Hemlock Grove and Arrested Development. The company are developing this aspect of their business, which is proving hugely popular and profitable. The future does seem bright for the company which announced it was expanding into its 64th country. It also seems likely their awards over the next few years will increase especially with recent praise of Orange is the New Black

Continue reading: Primetime Emmy Awards 2013: How Accurate Were Nomination Predictions?

Laura Linney Urges Women Mentor And Share Experiences At 40th Annual Women In Film Awards


Laura Linney Sofia Coppola George Lucas

The 2013 Women in Film Crystal + Lucy Awards were held in Beverly Hills this past Wednesday night and attracted a number of both female and male supporters of equality in the film industry. The Big C actress Laura Linney was on hand to accept the Lucy Award for excellence in film, as well as give a sort of “state of affairs” speech on gender equality.

"As an actress in film, it is very easy to become isolated just due to the ratio of gender inequality that exists," 49-year-old Linney said, via AceShowbiz. "Rarely do you have a scene with other women, very few women are on the crew, and what few female executives arrive tend to keep to themselves. You have fewer and fewer women to turn to for help or advice, and information is not easily shared."

She urged the members of the audience to stand against the problem of isolation by reaching out and mentoring other women: “Reach out to a younger actress, or junior executive, or crew person, or office worker or a student," she said. Take them to lunch, put in the time to talk and learn what they are encountering. Listen to their observations. Share with them your insight and your mistakes and share information so that our experiences are not wasted."

Continue reading: Laura Linney Urges Women Mentor And Share Experiences At 40th Annual Women In Film Awards

Laura Linney - Women In Film's 2013 Crystal + Lucy Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 12th June 2013

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Laura Linney
Laura Linney
Laura Linney
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Laura Linney - Good Shepherd Services Spring Party hosted by Isaac Mizrahi - New York City, New York , United States - Thursday 25th April 2013

John Benjamin Hickey, Laura Linney and Isaac Mizrahi

Laura Linney - ANN Opening night at the Vivian Beaumont Theatre - Arrivals - New York, NY, United States - Thursday 7th March 2013

Laura Linney

Laura Linney - Premiere of 'The Revisionist' held at the Cherry Lane Theatre - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Thursday 28th February 2013

Laura Linney
Laura Linney
Laura Linney

Hyde Park On Hudson Review


Good

The breezy, entertaining tone of this historical comedy-drama kind of undermines the fact that it centres on one of the most pivotal moments in US-British history. Director Michell (Notting Hill) knows how to keep an audience engaged, and yet he indulges in both tawdry innuendo and silly cliches, never giving the real-life events a proper sense of perspective. Even so, some terrific performances make it enjoyable.

The events in question take place in 1939, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt (Murray) invites Britain's King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (West and Colman) to visit Hyde Park, the upstate New York residence he shares with his mother (Wilson), while his wife Eleanor (Williams) lives down the road with her "she-male" friends. Roosevelt knows that George is here to ask for help against the growing threat of Hitler's Germany, and as a result of their talks a "special relationship" develops between America and Britain. Meanwhile, the womanising Roosevelt is not-so-quietly having an affair with his distant cousin and confidant Daisy (Linney).

Essentially there are two films here fighting for our attention. Much of the story is seen through Daisy's eyes, complete with an annoyingly mousy voiceover that never tells us anything we can't see on screen. Linney underplays the character to the point where we barely notice that she's in the room, and the depiction of Daisy's romance with FDR is often squirm-inducing. By contrast, the other aspect of the plot is fascinating, with West and especially Colman shining in their roles as witty, nervous Brits trying to make the most of the first ever visit of a British monarch to America. Their steely resolve is brilliantly undermined by their brittle nerves and endless curiosity. 

Continue reading: Hyde Park On Hudson Review

Hot Tickets! This Weekend’s US Movie Releases: Hyde Park On Hudson, Playing For Keeps, Lay The Favorite, Bad Kids Go To Hell


Bill Murray Roger Michell Laura Linney Olivia Williams Gerard Butler Jessica Biel Rebecca Hall Bruce Willis Stephen Frears Judd Nelson

Kind of a disappointing showing this week folks, best hold on for those Christmas heartwarmers, or, if you’re one of the 56 people left on the globe that haven’t seen Skyfall, that’s probably still showing…

Hyde Park On Hudson has been touted by many as Bill Murray’s next stab at Oscar success. However, the movie itself has hardly received glowing reviews. Directed by Roger Michell (Notting Hill) and also starring Laura Linney and Olivia Williams, Hyde Park on Hudson tells the story of Franklin D Roosevelt and his love affair with his distant cousin, Margaret Stuckley. The ‘action’ takes place over a weekend in 1939, when the King & Queen of England visited upstate New York.

Murray’s performance has been hailed as a masterpiece and there have been mutterings of Oscar contention, but it seems that Murray is a jewel in a pretty shabby crown, here. He may carry the film, but it’s clear that it’s a deadweight. Bill will have to keep his fingers crossed that the Academy award voters can stay awake through the historical drama long enough to appreciate his performance.

Continue reading: Hot Tickets! This Weekend’s US Movie Releases: Hyde Park On Hudson, Playing For Keeps, Lay The Favorite, Bad Kids Go To Hell

Laura Linney Saturday 13th October 2012 50th Annual New York Film Festival - 'Hyde Park On Hudson' Screening - Arrivals

Laura Linney
Laura Linney
Bill Murray, Roger Michell, Olivia Williams, Laura Linney and Richard Nelson

John Adams Review


Excellent
The mammoth success of David McCullough's John Adams (2001) was one of publishing's great shockers. How could a lengthy hardcover about America's least glamorous founding father sell so many copies?

It wasn't the Pulitzer that moved units. It was McCullough's storytelling which transformed Adams' life from a forgotten textbook paragraph to something deserving of a big-budget, seven-part HBO epic.

Continue reading: John Adams Review

The Savages Review


Very Good
Tamara Jenkins' The Savages opens with old people acting their age: playing a few holes of golf, aqua-aerobics, and even a dance troupe fitted with matching blue-and-silver leotards. Ideally, this is the way to slip into one's golden years; at least for one's kin. Quickly, however, we are introduced to Leonard Savage (Philip Bosco) eating a bowl a cereal at the Sun City home he shares with his catatonic girlfriend. When Lenny is chastised by a living aide for not flushing the toilet, he pulls a de Sade and writes "Prick" on the wall with his excrement. This is how the other half ages.

On the other side of the country, Lenny's two kids are busying themselves with crap jobs while they attempt to be acclaimed writers. Wendy (Laura Linney) temps at data-entry cubicles in New York City, using their copiers and mailing capabilities to apply for Guggenheim fellowships. When she can, she also sneaks into the supply room and steals her weight in pens and paper. She comes home to a message on her answering machine about her father's incident and panics. Meanwhile, Jon (Philip Seymour Hoffman) teaches at a second-rate Buffalo college as he attempts to finish research for a book on Bertolt Brecht. When Wendy pleads for him to help her hunt down their father, Jon responds with lethargic wit: "This is not a Sam Shepard play."

Continue reading: The Savages Review

The Nanny Diaries Review


Good
Somewhere between Mary Poppins and Sex and the City lies The Nanny Diaries, an adaptation of Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus' sordid, cynical best seller that is able to coast on its working-grrl attitude and a couple of intelligent casting decisions.

It's nice to see Scarlett Johansson outside of Woody Allen's clutches. Here she showcases her rarely exercised knack for self-deprecating physical comedy as Annie Braddock, titular babysitter and recent college graduate who postpones her inevitable plunge into the rat race by accepting a nanny position at the posh Upper East Side residence of snippy Mrs. X (Laura Linney, fabulous in the role).

Continue reading: The Nanny Diaries Review

The Hottest State Review


Weak
The film version of Ethan Hawke's The Hottest State, which he adapted from his own novel of the same name, represents a strange form of time-travel. In it, the young actor Mark Webber embodies the kind of character -- self-conscious, scruffy, chatty, and able to make self-deprecation seem downright pretentious -- that Hawke himself grew out of playing about 10 years ago. Webber even sounds a bit like Hawke in his voiceover narration; it's like a low-tech version of motion capture, allowing Hawke to virtually direct his ten-years-younger self.

Perhaps not coincidentally, a decade back is about when the novel version of The Hottest State came out. Webber/Hawke's William is an aspiring actor, apparently, though if this aspect of the character is autobiographical, Hawke left out any details that explain how exactly he got through any auditions without clever asides or other low-key hipster gestures. William is the type of guy who talks about acting almost exclusively in terms of personal metaphors about pretending and deception, despite never appearing to act like anyone but his own insecure, talkative self. While I don't doubt that some young actors behave this way, I have a little more trouble believing they'd somehow get flown down to Mexico to star in an Alfonso Cuarón movie (the name of the fictional film's director is never mentioned, but it's briefly visible on a clapboard, just long enough to register vague disbelief, even if it is just an autobiographical in-joke -- the real-life Hawke appeared in Cuarón's version of Great Expectations).

Continue reading: The Hottest State Review

Jindabyne Review


Excellent
Although the odor of buried sin and some vast, encroaching punishment hangs over most every frame of Jindabyne, this is hardly a religious film in the traditional manner. After a disturbing crime, church and an old family Christian tradition hold no succor. There seems to be only the wild vastness of Australia's New South Wales, a landscape more comfortable with the rawer, less enfeebled spirituality of the few, benighted aborigines still living in the area. Given the ardor with which some of the characters pursue a form of redemption, one can only hope that there's a god of sorts out there in the land's soaring endlessness paying attention -- and maybe even granting absolution.

Intelligently adapted by screenwriter Beatrix Christian from Raymond Carver's short story "So Much Water So Close to Home," Jindabyne is about the things people do to remember that they're alive, and the things they want to forget that make them feel dead. Set in the titular small village (a sign on the road identifies it as "a tidy town") Laura Linney and Gabriel Byrne play Claire and Stewart Kane, a couple with troubles surrounded by friends and coworkers with plenty of their own. Everyone works the small-time kind of jobs you can find in a town the size of Jindabyne, Claire clerking at a drugstore and Stewart (a former auto racing star) running a gas station. There's darkness in the Kanes' past, like the year and a half when Claire lived elsewhere after the birth of their son Tom (played with heartbreaking sincerity by Sean Rees-Wemyss), never explained. A couple they're friends with has troubles, too: a dead daughter and now the unexpected stewardship of their goddaughter, Caylin-Calandria (Eva Lazzaro), a haunted and troublemaking 10-year-old who seems to have a death wish.

Continue reading: Jindabyne Review

Breach Review


Very Good
Moving briskly from equivocator Stephen Glass to the chairman of the Benedict Arnold Fan Club, Robert Hanssen, director Billy Ray turns his tonal focus from Shattered Glass's journalistic felony to high crime in the intelligence agency. In what seems to be a new trend of cinematically capturing events before they have actually played out, Breach reenacts what is widely accepted as the greatest fracture of FBI security in the history of the organization.

Following possible terrorists and their contacts, Eric O'Neil (Ryan Phillipe) eagerly tries to discuss bureau protocol with his team, only to be ignored and have his well-prepared report on the subject shoved back in his face. That is, until he is dragged into a bureau conference room on a Sunday to meet with his superior and head agent Kate Burroughs (Laura Linney). It's here that O'Neil is asked to shadow Russian intelligence specialist Robert Hanssen (Chris Cooper) for what is originally agreed to be sexually perverse activities. It isn't till O'Neil is taken under wing by the intelligence expert that Burroughs reveals that Hanssen has actually been selling information to the Russians for some time and has cost the government billions of dollars and uncountable agent lives.

Continue reading: Breach Review

Driving Lessons Review


Weak
As with many young stars before him, Rupert Grint finally strikes out from his Harry Potter series to see if he has the chops to be anyone but Ron Weasley. Jeremy Brock's Driving Lessons offers him a more dramatic role compared to the comic-relief label that his character in the Potter films often is stamped with. It's a shame that the screenplay and filmmaking doesn't pursue the movie with the same integrity Grint attempts to instill into his character.

Ben Marshall (Grint) has been born into a house of piety. His father (Nicholas Farrell) is an English vicar and his mother (Laura Linney, of all people) preaches and speaks The Word with more holier-than-thou sentiment than her husband ever even considered. Ben's father is aloof to the fact that his wife is also being "visited" by a younger priest that works at his church. These things could be the explanation behind Ben's peculiar behavior with girls and other schoolmates, but his mother insists it's that he isn't doing enough in the community. To rectify this, Ben is somewhat forced into weed-pulling servitude to Evie Walton (Julie Walters), a washed-up theater actress who speaks with brash wit and blunt obviousness. As expected, what first starts out as awkward employer/employee relations turns into warm friendship and blossoms when Ben accompanies her to a small reading in Edinburgh, where Ben drops his V-card and, in theory, learns what life is really about.

Continue reading: Driving Lessons Review

Man Of The Year Review


Bad
Like a politician riding the campaign trail, Barry Levinson's Man of the Year talks out of both sides of its mouth by promising one thing but delivering another. Ad materials suggest an irreverent Robin Williams comedy that aims to satirize our electoral process. Once that plot is established, though, Year converts into a low-level political potboiler that's scraped from the sides of John Grisham's circular file.

What's funny about this deceptive bait-and-switch is that Year rests on the shoulders of a character whose primary directive is to slice through the empty rhetoric that's clogging our branches of government. Talk show host Tom Dobbs (Williams) takes Washington bureaucrats to task on a nightly basis - the character is modeled after Daily Show host Jon Stewart. At the urging of his fed-up fan base, Dobbs tosses his hat into the presidential race and hits the campaign trail with his manager (Christopher Walken) and producer (Lewis Black) in tow.

Continue reading: Man Of The Year Review

The House Of Mirth Review


Good
Draw near and bear witness to Gillian Anderson, a very successful television actress (The X Files) who is still trying to find her legs on the big screen. Like many before her, she will try a tactic that has made stars out of otherwise B-list actors: By taking the leading role in an art house flick.

Welcome then to The House of Mirth, a period piece which bears little happiness for those within. Or, ultimately, for those in the audience.

Continue reading: The House Of Mirth Review

P.S. Review


Very Good
Dylan Kidd's first film, Roger Dodger, conquered the rarified nation of two-character drama, anchored by Kidd's punchy dialogue and Campbell Scott's commanding lead performance. Kidd's follow-up, P.S., suggests he's not quite ready to expand. Not that this is a bad thing. Nor does Kidd actually repeat himself -- as there are a good deal more than two important characters in P.S., and that's the problem.

The two we care about are Louise (Laura Linney) and F. Scott (Topher Grace), an admissions officer at Columbia University and a prospective student, respectively. Their relationship hangs on a fascinatingly awkward hook: F. Scott is the spitting image of Louise's long-ago first love (now deceased): in body, mind, soul, and some other ways that are even harder to fake, like handwriting. Louise, a lonely divorcee, latches onto F. Scott's eerie familiarity. F. Scott, as a young man, latches onto Louise's cautious older-woman hotness.

Continue reading: P.S. Review

You Can Count On Me Review


Excellent
You Can Count on Me is a film that, in true Sundance form, mixes the familiar with the unexpected. The Best Dramatic Film winner from this year's festival has some actors we've seen before (including Matthew Broderick) and some traditional storylines (single Mom's troubles, loner returns to hometown), but first-time writer-director Ken Lonergan adds just enough unpredictable dialogue and creativity to make this movie the real deal.

The single Mom is Sammy (Laura Linney), an organized bank loan officer living in her small-town childhood home. The loner is her scraggly brother Terry (Mark Ruffalo), a troubled wanderer coming back to ask Sammy for cash. And while this seems pretty basic from the outset, Lonergan has some smart ideas up his sleeve.

Continue reading: You Can Count On Me Review

Lush Review


OK
Never mind the spooky box cover image and creepy tagline, Lush is hardly the gothic melodrama its promotion tries to sell. And that's probably for the better, because as a dark thriller this movie isn't going to win many fans.

The story follows a washed-up golfer (Campbell Scott), fresh out of prison, who returns to his home town of New Orleans to get a fresh start. Soon enough he's wrapped up with a wealthy-yet-drunk lawyer (Jared Harris), who takes him from one socialite party to the next. But then the lawyer turns up missing, and most people suspect our ex-con hero has done away with him.

Continue reading: Lush Review

Love Actually Review


Very Good
I can only presume that the British calendar is so uniquely screwy that it allows for a Christmas movie to open a week after Halloween. Or maybe Love Actually is just in a universe of its own... one in which the prime minister is inaugurated in November and where an adverb can be used to modify a noun.

But a little oddness is forgivable: Directing a movie is a strange place for Richard Curtis, who's written umpteen Brit-friendly movies and TV shows over the years but hasn't directed one, until now.

Continue reading: Love Actually Review

Absolute Power Review


Bad
Really lame thriller about the president and the cover-up that ensues when he murders some hot chick. Can't believe William Goldman wrote this crap, or that Eastwood, Hackman, Harris, and Davis bothered to get involved with it either.

The Life Of David Gale Review


Weak
Let's start by clearing up a common misconception: Despite an uninspired and pretentious title that indicates to the contrary, The Life of David Gale is not a true story. Laughably, even the Austin Visitors Bureau posted on its web site that it's based on fact! (The film was shot at and around The University of Texas at Austin (my alma mater), dubbed The University of Austin in the film for soon-to-be-apparent reasons.) Now one would think that a story about an anti-death penalty activist who ends up on death row himself would jog some memories at the Bureau, but oh well. Maybe it's just wishful thinking. Not much of historical note has happened in Austin since Charles Whitman's shooting spree killed 16 people in 1966.

This is a movie meant to be a sophisticated take on criminal punishment, but unfortunately it's actually the kind of garden variety thriller that Hollywood pumps out with one thought: to keep you guessing what surprise The Big Twist will bring. Unconvinced? Recent garbage like High Crimes and Reindeer Games leap to mind. Same formula, same disastrous results.

Continue reading: The Life Of David Gale Review

The Exorcism Of Emily Rose Review


Good
For the record, I'm suspicious of any film that claims to be based on "true events." The opening credits for The Exorcism of Emily Rose tell us that it is based on the true story of a priest accused of negligent homicide resulting from an exorcism gone bad. Really, unless you lived it yourself, how do you actually know what happened? So many made-for-entertainment movies are guilty of stretching reality so thin that it's difficult to trust the "truth" that is told to us. Some subjects are just better told as documentaries.

And Rose is one of those films. That's not to say that Rose is not entertaining in its current form -- it is. I'm giving it a marginal recommendation. But knowing that it is based on the events surrounding the Catholic Church's recognition of demonic possession, the way that the film unfolds does not give the story enough due justice. Instead of the model of reality that it's credentials claim it to be, Rose plays out like an overly calculated episode of Law and Order.

Continue reading: The Exorcism Of Emily Rose Review

Mystic River Review


Weak
Around this time of year, select projects start entering theaters powered by an invisible yet completely tangible force known as Awards Buzz. Mystic River, Clint Eastwood's adaptation of Dennis Lehane's textured novel, enjoys such clout, and with good reason. For his 24th directorial effort, the Hollywood legend assembles an impressive cast and marries them to a hefty and literate screenplay by Oscar-winner Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential). Then, in typical Clint fashion, he challenges his actors to claw out from underneath his heavy-handed direction.

Some manage, but most do not, and River drowns in tedium and cumbersome symbolism as a result. The 73-year-old Eastwood remains a meat-and-potatoes filmmaker. He's not afraid to take chances when selecting material, but his no-nonsense approach regardless of the content dooms this and other projects to a static and mind-numbingly wearisome state.

Continue reading: Mystic River Review

The Mothman Prophecies Review


Very Good
Although its title sounds new age goofy, The Mothman Prophecies most certainly is not. It's an intelligent, tense thriller of the unexplained, a film for anyone who thinks the X Files movie comes up short. In fact, most of the action plays out like an extended X Files episode, one that would leave fans of the genre a little spooked, slightly sad, and wanting more.

Based on real events, most of which occurred in 1966 and 1967 (the film is set in present day), The Mothman Prophecies is a complex meeting of unseen monsters, voices from beyond, and eerie coincidence (...or is it?) Richard Gere stars as John Klein, an established Washington Post reporter whose good fortune is shattered when his beautiful wife Mary (Debra Messing) sustains severe injuries in what appears to be a single car accident. As Mary slips in and out of consciousness, she asks if John has seen "it." "It," according to her wild sketches, appears to be some sort of beastly giant bat. Either Mary has suffered brain damage, or something wholly supernatural has entered John's life.

Continue reading: The Mothman Prophecies Review

Kinsey Review


Excellent
In 1948, Alfred Kinsey, a goofy-looking professor from Indiana University previously known (if at all) for his long and laborious study of gull wasps, published Sexual Behavior in the American Male, and the country was never the same. For years, Kinsey had been trekking across the country with his team of researchers, interviewing and studying thousands of people about their sexual attitudes and behavior. His book was the result of this survey, and it tried to prove to Americans - many of whom were starting to believe the Cold War propaganda of conformity being forced upon them - that their fellow citizens were much more sexually diverse (and perverse) than had ever been previously thought.

In Kinsey, writer/director Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters) makes all this into a divertingly fresh story about a scientific crusader who was just too honest and inquisitive for his own good. But rather than taking a straightforward biographical approach, Condon fortunately makes the film a character study of Kinsey himself, wisely placing star Liam Neeson front and center. The film opens in black and white, Neeson quizzing his researchers on how best to interview a subject for the study. He's forthright, strong-willed and oddly provocative - you'd give up your life story to this guy in about ten seconds.

Continue reading: Kinsey Review

Kinsey Review


Good

Writer-director Bill Condon has a talent for hitting just the right tone in his work. Whether he's paying stylistic homage to "Bride of Frankenstein" creator James Whale in "Gods and Monsters" or writing a screenplay for "Chicago" that re-envisioned the Broadway musical as a wannabe showgirl's uniquely cinematic daydream, Condon always finds a way to seamlessly marry the crux of his story to the strengths of his medium.

In "Kinsey," he legitimizes and revitalizes a rather tiresome narrative gimmick -- on-camera interviews with the characters. For a biopic about legendary sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, there could be no more apropos structure for the story. Kinsey himself interviewed thousands of Americans about their bedroom predilections in the 1940s and '50s to compile his groundbreaking, rather comprehensive and certainly controversial studies on the subject. So Condon opens the film in kind -- with a simple, head-on, black-and-white image of the bluntly matter-of-fact and obliviously awkward Professor Kinsey (Liam Neeson) being quizzed about his own background and sexual experience.

Composing the film around Kinsey's answers, Condon cues flashbacks of an upbringing under the fire-and-brimstone hand of a preacher father (John Lithgow), introduces the equally clinical-yet-passionate student who becomes his wife (Laura Linney), touches on the man's own pseudo-scientific dalliances and their promiscuous effect on his marriage, and sets the stage for the studies that helped launch the sexual revolution.

Continue reading: Kinsey Review

The House Of Mirth Review


Good

Director Terrence Davies took a chance casting "The X-Files'" Gillian Anderson as the devastated heroine in his adaptation of "The House of Mirth," Edith Wharton's corset opera of turn-of-the-Century social politics.

But in her first 20 seconds on screen -- speaking in deliciously eloquent dialogue and looking stunning in plumed hats with veils, fur collared dresses, brooches and a parasol -- she erases any and all memory of Agent Scully, the TV alter-ego you probably thought would haunt the actress for the rest of her career.

A drawing room drama about the whispered politics and wily business of marriage in New York high society, the film is about a beautiful young socialite whose life becomes hampered with scandal, in part because she can't reconcile her heart with the fact that she must marry well to maintain her station.

Continue reading: The House Of Mirth Review

The Life Of David Gale Review


Weak

Practically trumpeting its utter dependence on Hollywood convention, the death row drama-with-a-twist entitled "The Life of David Gale" acts as its own executioner, injecting the very first scene with a lethal cliché from which the film never recovers.

In the opening moments, a rental car driven by a big-city journalist (Kate Winslet) breaks down on a lonely Texas highway as she's desperately rushing to an execution with evidence that could exonerate the man scheduled to die.

So trite and inane is this plot device that 11 years ago it was a major punchline in Robert Altman's cynical, Hollywood-skewering farce "The Player." But to director Alan Parker ("Angela's Ashes") and writer Charles Randolph this is a very serious moment in what they erroneously hope will be a very important film about the capital punishment debate.

Continue reading: The Life Of David Gale Review

Laura Linney

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Laura Linney

Date of birth

5th February, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.70


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Laura Linney Movies

Nocturnal Animals Movie Review

Nocturnal Animals Movie Review

It's been seven years since designer Tom Ford made a splash with his award-winning writing-directing...

Nocturnal Animals Trailer

Nocturnal Animals Trailer

For a short time, Edward and Susan had a happy marriage, they lived in a...

Sully Trailer

Sully Trailer

Chesley Sullenberger has been a pilot all of his adult life. Having had an interest...

Genius Trailer

Genius Trailer

Thomas Wolfe was a writer who was used to rejection. His constantly lengthy novels didn't...

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2: Out Of The Shadows Trailer

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2: Out Of The Shadows Trailer

Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael are back in full force and ready to protect their...

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Mr. Holmes Movie Review

Mr. Holmes Movie Review

Despite this being a film about Sherlock Holmes, the fact that it's not much of...

Mr Holmes - Teaser Trailer

Mr Holmes - Teaser Trailer

The year is 1947. Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) is 93 years old and living in...

Mr Holmes Trailer

Mr Holmes Trailer

Time makes a fool of all of us; even the greatest minds will become blunt...

The Fifth Estate Trailer

The Fifth Estate Trailer

'The Fifth Estate' stars Benedict Cumberbatch, Laura Linney, Daniel Bruhl and Stanley Tucci along with...

Morning Trailer

Morning Trailer

Alice and Mark are a married couple who are desperately struggling to come to terms...

The Fifth Estate Trailer

The Fifth Estate Trailer

When Julian Assange began to leak damaging governmental information online through WikiLeaks, he was praised...

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Hyde Park on Hudson Movie Review

Hyde Park on Hudson Movie Review

The breezy, entertaining tone of this historical comedy-drama kind of undermines the fact that it...

Hyde Park On Hudson Trailer

Hyde Park On Hudson Trailer

'Hyde Park On Hudson' is the story of the 32nd President of the United States...

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