Lucas Black Page 2

Lucas Black

Lucas Black Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

Fast 8: The Fate of the Furious Trailer


If you thought things had cooled down for the 'Fast and Furious' team in the last film, you were wrong. They compromised their amnesty over their past crimes with events in 'Furious 7', and now most fo the group has disbanded, Brian and Mia have retired from their street-racing-cum-crime careers and Dom (Vin Diesel) and Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) are intending to follow a normal life following their honeymoon. Unfortunately, Dom's love of danger draws him to a mysterious stranger who enlists him into another crime-fuelled adventure which takes him everywhere from Cuba to New York to the Arctic. He ends up betraying his closest friends, people who have become more like family, as he embarks on a journey that will bring him challenges that he's never experience before.

Continue: Fast 8: The Fate of the Furious Trailer

42 Trailer


42 is the true to life story of Jackie Robinson and his rise to the top as one of America's best and most respected Baseball players and the manager of Brooklyn Dodgers, Branch Rickey, who decided to end racial segregation by enlisting Robinson onto his team.

Brian Helgeland ("L.A. Confidential") comes the real-life drama "42," starring Chadwick Boseman ("The Express") as Jackie Robinson and Oscar¸ nominee Harrison Ford ("Witness") as Branch Rickey.

In 1947, Branch Rickey controversially made a name for himself when he signed Jackie Robinson to the Brooklyn Dodgers. At the time, this kind of behaviour was unheard of, and both Robinson and Rickey were sure to cause problems for themselves - both on and off the pitch. Racism was rife between player on every team including the Dodgers and Robinson's transition was one of the most courageous of its time. 

Continue: 42 Trailer

Get Low Trailer


When an aging hermit by the name of Felix Bush decides to have a living funeral, most of the folks in the town were surprised by the idea. For many years rumours of devil worship, murder and other terrible crimes have circulated through the town and now, Felix wishes to tell them the truth behind his lonely existence.

Continue: Get Low Trailer

Legion Review


Good
There's nothing wrong with being preposterous, but this guilty pleasure thriller has a tendency to be pretentious as well. Despite a few winks at the camera, the emphasis on po-faced, nasty brutality wears rather thin.

The angel Michael (Bettany) has fallen from heaven, cut off his wings and armed himself to the teeth. Soon he's holed up in a remote desert diner run by Bob (Quaid) and his son Jeep (Black). Michael encourages the rag-tag group in the diner (including Gibson's shady tough guy, one-armed chef Dutton and bickering family Walsh, Tenney and Holland) to fight an invading horde of zombies, apparently sent by God to destroy humanity. And mankind's only hope is to save the unborn child of a waitress (Palicki) from the snarling angel Gabriel (Durand).

Continue reading: Legion Review

Legion Trailer


Watch the trailer for Legion

Continue: Legion Trailer

The Fast And The Furious: Tokyo Drift Review


Good
The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift plays like the archetypal Western. A newcomer arrives in town, upsets the locals, plays with hearts, and rides around a lot before a final "this town ain't big enough for the both of us" showdown sends him, or someone else, on their way. Of course, the movie is actually an Eastern: The frontier is Japan, the town is big enough for about 20 million, and there is plenty of horsepower, but not a mare or stallion in sight. Despite the setting, the basic principles remain unchanged. The stranger, Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) is an Alabaman High School student, sent away to live with his seafaring father (Brian Goodman) in Tokyo after getting in trouble with the law back home. It seems Sean can't stop racing cars. Unfortunately, for unknowing parents, the wild wild East of Japan is a paradise for the boy from the west, with its underground racing culture and scantily clad sirens, and soon Sean finds himself tangled in the criminal engine of his dangerous new town.In Tokyo, Sean meets Twinkie (Bow Wow), an iPod-dealing "army brat" who introduces him to the city's racing underworld. Every night, groups of outrageously dressed young people take their outrageously painted cars out for some dynamically orchestrated races. The Yakuza (Japanese mafia) is heavily involved in the races, and the Drift King, DK (Brian Tee), is high up in their ranks. Of course, in grand Point Break (and, um, Fast and the Furious) tradition, Sean takes a liking to DK's girl, Neela (Nathalie Kelley), causing DK to take an extreme disliking to Sean. The two race, and the newcomer loses. However, DK's business partner and seeming sage, Han (Sung Kang), sees a spark in the kid, and vows to train him in the ancient Japanese art of drifting (driving sideways). All Sean has to in return, is run a few criminal errands.To describe the plot of The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift is more effort than it's worth (and possibly more effort than it took to come up with). Plot, dialogue, character development: All are irrelevant. What clearly matters to the filmmakers, and one suspects, to those contemplating a trip to the theatre to see it, is the sound and fury of the thing. On this level, Justin Lin's film is a grand achievement. Every race and chase is brilliantly handled. The concept of drifting, really just a fancy name for a movement we've all seen before, is nonetheless utilized to breathtaking effect. When Sean races DK down a windy mountain road, both cars drifting dangerously close to an off-road disaster, Lin's camera plummets and whips around, itself racing and demonstrating the consequences of any potential mishaps. He is a director with an innovative eye suited to this kinetic material.Unfortunately, where the eye is strong, the ear is weak. Alfredo Botello, Chris Morgan and Kario Salem's screenplay is a paint-by-numbers job that fails even to color effectively within the lines. The script is woeful. There are attempts at exposition, humor and development, all of which fail and act merely as speed bumps for a film otherwise moving well. The most hilarious scene involves a rooftop discussion between Han and Sean, supposed to establish their bond and some bizarre driver philosophy, that instead sets itself up for instant parody.Despite its execrable screenplay, some dull performances (although it must be said that Black can scowl with the best of them), and failure on nearly almost every level but the action, Tokyo Drift still manages to kind of work. The racing scenes are that good and that frequent that one can almost forgive everything else. It's a Western: We know it's junk; we just want the showdown. On this level, the film provides. It is not as good as a certain other movie about "cars" currently playing, but then that movie hit on a fundamental point. It let the cars, not the people, do the talking. Looking at Twinkie's green Hulk car, I couldn't help but let my mind drift, and think, "Ahhh, if these cars could talk...."They went thattaway.

All The Pretty Horses Review


Weak
All the Pretty Horses reminds me of a bad comedian telling a joke. He begins with an awful set-up and takes forever introducing the characters. If you're lucky, he stumbles into the narrative within five minutes. By the time he's arrived at the punch line, you don't care. You've forgotten the setup altogether.

Billy Bob Thornton's latest film, which examines a Texas cowboy trying to find his dreams in 1949 Mexico, is a tale I might have been interested in. But like that lousy comedian, Thornton's delivery positively stinks. And, what's worse, I couldn't find the punch line anywhere.

Continue reading: All The Pretty Horses Review

Crazy In Alabama Review


Weak
This bizarrely incoherent tale set in the segregated South mixes two stories as well as oil and water. One follows Melanie Griffith's neo-psychotic widow on a cross-country trip with her husband's decapitated head along for the ride. The second follows her nephew's quest to integrate a small town in Alabama. The only thing scarier than Griffith's black fright wig is the "directed by Antonio Banderas" credit. Talk about crazy.

Friday Night Lights Review


Very Good
When the lights come on at the 20,000-seat Ratliff Stadium, the city of Odessa, Texas shuts down. Streets are deserted and stores close early so that everyone can crowd onto the sparse campus of Permian High School to cheer on their Panthers. In this small, barren town, Friday night football is bigger than life.

Based on journalist H.G. Bissinger's best selling book, Friday Night Lights examines the craze surrounding the team's bumpy road to the 1988 state championship. For these players, excelling at football is the only ticket out of their dilapidated desert town. All of Odessa's residents are motivated to do their part to help get them out. Players are pushed to the breaking point on the field by driven coaches, and equally pressed off the field by their win-obsessed parents. At the local burger joint, players eat for free, heed words of advice, and pose for pictures with fans.

Continue reading: Friday Night Lights Review

Cold Mountain Review


Weak

From the very first words of its opening voice-over, inwhich a detectable trace of Aussie inflection invades Nicole Kidman's affectedSouthern accent, there's something amiss with "Cold Mountain,"a two-and-a-half-hour Civil War epic built around a lackluster love story,written and directed by an Englishman, starring half a dozen British actorsand shot in Romania.

Sweeping in scope, the picture's earnest intentions, periodatmosphere and cinematic beauty are above reproach as it portrays brutal,bloody, brother-against-brother battlefields and a North Carolina home-fronthamlet where prim, city-bred newcomer Ada Monroe (Nicole Kidman) waitsfor the return of her soldier sweetheart while struggling to survive onher dead father's farm.

And yet, the emotional investment in the characters issomething less than sweeping. The passionless decorum of Ada's first-reelcourtship by the adoring but reticent Inman (Jude Law), the declarationof war which cuts short their time together, and the questionable castingof Kidman -- who at 36 is too old to be credible as a bashful unmarriedbelle in 1864 Dixie -- result in a lack of validity and vitality that isn'tremedied until the invigorating second-act arrival of Renee Zellweger.

Continue reading: Cold Mountain Review

Friday Night Lights Review


Weak

"Friday Night Lights" takes place in a dismal West Texas suburb where society revolves entirely around high school football and the "winning is everything" philosophy is considered an All-American value.

Director Peter Berg ("The Rundown") vividly captures life here beginning with the opening shot -- an aerial view of sagebrush, oil pumps and dust rising to a hazy horizon as a pickup barrels down a dirt road, an AM radio sports show blaring out its windows with boorish, pejorative fans calling in for a round of Monday morning quarterbacking.

But the film seems to endorse the hardcore sports-junkie attitude that obstinately forgives arrogance, misogyny, substance abuse, narrow-mindedness and bullying in any star athlete just as long as he produces results on the field. The movie's principles are seriously out of whack, even as it angles toward a Big Life Lesson about learning to live with falling short of greatness.

Continue reading: Friday Night Lights Review

Crazy In Alabama Review


OK

After a 26-year career of coming off like fingernails on a chalkboard, Melanie Griffith has finally begun to mature as an actress.

In 1996 she stood out from the otherwise sorry "Mullholland Falls" in an emotional role as a cheating cop's heartbroken wife. Early this year she was a revelation as an aging heroine addict and ironically motherly, career petty thief in "Another Day in Paradise." And now there's "Crazy In Alabama," an daffy, obliging murder farce set precariously against more serious undertones of 1960s racial strife.

Griffith was the perfect choice to star as Lucille, a dizzy, Southern, '60s sex bomb housewife, on the lam and headed for Hollywood after offing her abusive husband. Of course, the part was hers anyway, since this picture is the directorial debut of her husband, smoldering Spanish sex symbol Antonio Banderas.

Continue reading: Crazy In Alabama Review

All The Pretty Horses Review


OK

In directing "All the Pretty Horses," a romantic homage to the great American cowboy epic, Billy Bob Thornton adheres honorably to the code of the Western and emerges with a familiar and satisfying -- if not entirely memorable -- eulogy to a lifestyle that rode off into the sunset some time last century.

The film takes place in 1949 and follows a handsome young rancher, played with surprising 10-gallon-hat credibility by Matt Damon (he says "I reckon" like he means it), who clings to the cowboy way as he tries to find a new life in Mexico after losing his family's long-time homestead.

"Come to find out, Mama means to sell it," Damon narrates in a flawless Texas drawl. "Says the oil company will pay her three times what it's worth."

Continue reading: All The Pretty Horses Review

Lucas Black

Lucas Black Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Lucas Black

Date of birth

29th November, 1982

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.78




Lucas Black Movies

Fast and Furious 8 (The Fate Of The Furious) Super Bowl Trailer

Fast and Furious 8 (The Fate Of The Furious) Super Bowl Trailer

Just what does Dominic Toretto think he's doing? It seems the original team has disbanded,...

Fast 8: The Fate of the Furious Trailer

Fast 8: The Fate of the Furious Trailer

If you thought things had cooled down for the 'Fast and Furious' team in the...

Furious 7 - Super Bowl TV Spot Trailer

Furious 7 - Super Bowl TV Spot Trailer

The sins of London have followed them home. After throwing Owen Shaw (Luke Evans) out...

Furious 7 Trailer

Furious 7 Trailer

The cast of 'Furious 7' talk about their favourite moments from the 'Fast & Furious'...

Fast & Furious 7 Trailer

Fast & Furious 7 Trailer

There's ever more death-defying stunts to be had with this crack team of vehicular warriors,...

42 Movie Review

42 Movie Review

What could easily have been a sentimental slog is given a spark of intelligent wit...

42 Trailer

42 Trailer

42 is the true to life story of Jackie Robinson and his rise to the...

Promised Land Movie Review

Promised Land Movie Review

Hydraulic fracturing might not be the most compelling subject for a movie, but it provides...

Promised Land Trailer

Promised Land Trailer

Steve Butler is a successful businessman as part of a natural gas company who wishes...

Get Low Movie Review

Get Low Movie Review

Not only is this film elegantly shot, with a gorgeous sense both of internal textures...

Get Low Trailer

Get Low Trailer

When an aging hermit by the name of Felix Bush decides to have a living...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.