Martin Sheen Page 4

Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

Martin Sheen Saturday 24th March 2012 has lunch with his family at Howdy's Mexican restaurant in Malibu

Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen and Rte Studios Friday 24th February 2012 Celebrities outside the RTE Studios for 'The Late Late Show'

Martin Sheen and Rte Studios
Martin Sheen and Rte Studios
Martin Sheen and Rte Studios
Martin Sheen and Rte Studios
Martin Sheen and Rte Studios

Martin Sheen Friday 24th February 2012 Martin Sheen at Today FM studios

Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen and Jason Donovan
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen

Tom Hickey, Martin Sheen and Dublin International Film Festival - Tom Hickey and Martin Sheen Thursday 23rd February 2012 Jameson Dublin International Film Festival - 'Stella Days' premiere at Cineworld Dublin - Arrivals

Tom Hickey, Martin Sheen and Dublin International Film Festival
Tom Hickey, Martin Sheen, Stephen Rea and Dublin International Film Festival
Tom Hickey and Dublin International Film Festival

Martin Sheen and Dublin International Film Festival - Martin Sheen and guest Thursday 23rd February 2012 leaving the Merrion Hotel to attend the screening of 'Stella Days' at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival

Martin Sheen and Dublin International Film Festival
Martin Sheen and Dublin International Film Festival
Martin Sheen and Dublin International Film Festival

Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez - Producer, David Alexanian, Martin Sheen, Director, Emilio Estevez, New York City, USA - at the premiere of 'The Way' to benefit the Walkabout Foundation at School of Visual Arts. Wednesday 5th October 2011

Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez

Martin Sheen Sunday 28th August 2011 advance screening of 'The Way' held at the Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center San Rafael, California

Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez - Sonja Magdevski, Martin Sheen, Emilio Estevez, David Alexanian Thursday 11th August 2011 at Chicago International Film Festival Chicago, Illinois

Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez - Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez Dublin, Ireland - 'The Way' Irish premiere held at The Savoy Theater Thursday 24th February 2011

Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez

Martin Sheen Wednesday 23rd February 2011 celebrities outside The May Fair Hotel London, England

Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen

Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen Monday 21st February 2011 'The Way' UK film premiere held at the BFI South Bank - Arrivals. London, England

Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen
Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen
Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen
Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen
Emilio Estevez
Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen

Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen Sunday 12th September 2010 The 35th Toronto International Film Festival - amfAR Cinema Against AIDS - Gala Toronto, Canada

Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen
Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen
Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen
Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen
Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen - Martin Sheen arriving at his hotel Toronto, Canada - The 35th Toronto International Film Festival Sunday 12th September 2010

Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen - Wednesday 1st April 2009 at Paley Center for Media New York City, USA

Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen and Bradley Whitford - Martin Sheen and Bradley Whitford Washington DC, USA - 'Faces of the Employee Free Choice Act' campaign held at the Russell Senate Building, The Capitol. Tuesday 31st March 2009

Martin Sheen and Bradley Whitford
Richard Schiff and Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen and Bradley Whitford
Richard Schiff and Martin Sheen
Richard Schiff and Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen and Paramount Pictures Wednesday 25th February 2009 World Premiere of 'Echlon Conspiracy' held at the Paramount Pictures Studio Hollywood. Los Angeles, California

Martin Sheen and Paramount Pictures
Martin Sheen and Paramount Pictures
Martin Sheen and Paramount Pictures
Martin Sheen and Paramount Pictures
Martin Sheen and Paramount Pictures
Martin Sheen and Paramount Pictures

Martin Sheen Tuesday 10th February 2009 arriving at LAX on a flight from London Los Angeles, California

Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez
Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez

Isaac Hayes, Barry White, Ben Affleck, Martin Sheen, Nicolas Cage, South Park and Grammy Thursday 11th October 2007 Washington DC

Isaac Hayes, Barry White, Ben Affleck, Martin Sheen, Nicolas Cage, South Park and Grammy

Isaac Hayes, Barry White, Ben Affleck, Denzel Washington, Martin Sheen, Nicolas Cage, South Park and Grammy Saturday 2nd April 2005

Isaac Hayes, Barry White, Ben Affleck, Denzel Washington, Martin Sheen, Nicolas Cage, South Park and Grammy

Isaac Hayes, Barry White, Ben Affleck, Martin Sheen, Nicolas Cage, South Park and Grammy Thursday 4th November 2004 Hollywood, California

Isaac Hayes, Barry White, Ben Affleck, Martin Sheen, Nicolas Cage, South Park and Grammy

Gandhi Review


Extraordinary
In a society rife with Robin Williams waterworks and Ben Affleck angst, it's nice to have an occasional jolt of truth. Gandhi, while a couple of decades old now, still has that bold-faced honesty which we find so often lacking in many contemporary films.

Gandhi stars Ben Kingsley in a retelling of the life and times of revered Indian leader Mohandas Gandhi, renowned peace lover, sage, and all around worldly wise man. There is little told here that cannot be read in any history book, for Gandhi is not some sort of Hollywood trumped up, Pearl Harbored dramatization of history. Rather, it's just the facts, nothing but truth.

Continue reading: Gandhi Review

The Dead Zone Review


Very Good
One of the more successful entries into the Stephen King horror film genre (and probably the best under the Dino De Laurentiis production label), The Dead Zone is aided in no small part by Christopher Walken in the lead role.

Walken stars as high school teacher Johnny Smith, who wrecks his Beetle and spends five years in a coma, only to discover he now has the gift of second sight. Predicting local tragedies is one thing, but eventually he becomes entangled in a political race (with Martin Sheen running for President), and Johnny foresees that if he wins, disaster will ensue (you know, the nuclear kind).

Continue reading: The Dead Zone Review

The Departed Review


Excellent

Just as Spike Lee took a basic caper and added his own pet issues to elevate Inside Man to the upper echelons of its genre, Martin Scorsese has taken The Departed, based on an intriguingly simple premise, to its own heights by infusing issues that have concerned him ever since Mean Streets. Along the way, he makes room for some memorable performances, not the least of which comes from the most likely of sources.

The Departed is based on the Hong Kong blockbuster Infernal Affairs, in which a cop goes undercover in the mob while the mob places one of their own as a mole in the police force. In Scorsese's version, the scene shifts to Boston, where mob boss Frank Costello (Jack Nicholson) puts loyal-from-boyhood employee Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) through police training. As Sullivan rises through the ranks, Special Investigations Unit chiefs Queenan (Martin Sheen) and Dignam (Mark Wahlberg) recruit rookie Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio) to get "kicked off" the force and do time to gain Costello's confidence.

All of this happens before the opening titles.

Continue reading: The Departed Review

Badlands Review


Excellent
Terrence Malick introduced his odd yet highly compelling filmmaking style in this 1973 feature, inspired by the long murder spree of Charles Starkweather (here Kit Carruthers, played by Martin Sheen). Carruthers is a garbage man who spies Holly (Sissy Spacek, who narrates disaffectedly) twirling her baton, soon after he's shot her family dead and they're on the run, living in the woods and the badlands of the northern midwest as they try to get to Canada to make a hastily planned escape. Body counts rise, but Malick isn't overly concerned with the violence. He takes us inside the heads of this bizarre duo, the quiet sociopath Kit and the even quieter neurotic Holly. One of cinema's most curious character studies and probably still Malick's best film.

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

Tibet: Cry Of The Snow Lion Review


Excellent
What are we going to do about Tibet? It's a heartbreaking question that has no easy answers. Tom Peosay's meticulously prepared Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion is an excellent introduction to the genocidal horrors that have been committed by the Chinese government against the people of Tibet for 50 years. It's also a powerful primer on the geopolitical realities of the 21st century that make any relief for suffering Tibetans hard to imagine, at least in the short term. Only the superhuman compassion of the Dalai Lama himself shines a ray of light on this very dark situation.

The documentary is not a hysterical human rights diatribe (even though Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins are present in voiceovers). Peosay points out that Tibetan society was never Shangri-la. It was a highly stratified culture, with armies of peasants serving a fat aristocracy. What everyone shared, however, was a lifestyle built entirely around profound spiritualism. When the Chinese communists invaded to stake their claim to the massive Tibetan plateau in 1950 (Tibet had always considered itself independent of China but didn't have any particular international recognition of that fact), one of their claims was that they had arrived to redistribute land to the peasants, just as they had done in the rest of China. Unfortunately, the landowners were the clergy, and the Tibetan people wouldn't tolerate the abuse of the monks and lamas who served as their spiritual leaders. By 1959, a full crackdown was underway, and during the Cultural Revolution, more than 6,000 monasteries were destroyed. By the time of Mao's death in 1976, one in six Tibetans -- more than a million -- had died of starvation or met a violent end.

Continue reading: Tibet: Cry Of The Snow Lion Review

O Review


Good
Well, all good classics eventually come to a crashing end (Planet of the Apes, anyone?), and the works of Shakespeare are no exception. This time out, it's Othello that gets an urban/teen makeover -- and considering that Slick Willy's themes about the hazards of interracial relationships are still present after 400 years, you'd think O would be a gimme. No such luck.

With this updating, Othello and Desdemona have become Odin and Desi. Odin (Mekhi Phifer) is the sole black student at a ritzy prep school for the overly wealthy. He's also the star basketball player, destined for greatness in college ball, at least. He carries on a semi-secret love affair with Desi (Julia Stiles), a waifish Julia Stiles stock character, who is also the daughter of the dean (John Heard). The basketball coach (Martin Sheen) favors his star player, of course, virtually ignoring his own son Hugo (Josh Hartnett, in the famed and villainous Iago role), who even turns to steroids (gasp!) to improve his performance in an attempt to match Odin's court prowess. After years of no luck and less love, Hugo eventually masterminds a plan to disgrace Odin... all of which ends disastrously, as you know if you've ever read the play.

Continue reading: O Review

Shadrach Review


Good
Bizarre southern morality fable, about a poor man who encounters a homeless ex-slave on the verge of his death. Poor southern man must then come to grips with burying this guy. Uh, okay. 80 minutes of breezy cinematic fluff.

Apocalypse Now Review


Essential
In the grand tradition of movies that explore the reality that is the Vietnam War, one film stands out -- for defying reality.

Martin Sheen stars as Captain Willard, sent upriver in war-torn 'Nam to "terminate, with extreme prejudice" one Colonel Kurtz (Brando), a former green beret who has gone primal all the way in Cambodia and has taken on the guise of a god to the local people of the area.

Continue reading: Apocalypse Now Review

Monument Ave. Review


Good
Weird little Ted Demme movie about (what else?) drugs and thugs. Denis Leary plays a low-level gangster in an Irish mob, forced to maintain utmost secrecy when one of his best friends is capped by the boss right in front of his eyes (and in a rather jarring sequence). Curious story, it tells us about loyalty but never says whether that's a good or a bad thing. Not to mention, it's always tough to take Leary seriously in a dramatic role. At least he really is Irish.

Continue reading: Monument Ave. Review

The Dead Zone Review


Very Good
One of the more successful entries into the Stephen King horror film genre (and probably the best under the Dino De Laurentiis production label), The Dead Zone is aided in no small part by Christopher Walken in the lead role.

Walken stars as high school teacher Johnny Smith, who wrecks his Beetle and spends five years in a coma, only to discover he now has the gift of second sight. Predicting local tragedies is one thing, but eventually he becomes entangled in a political race (with Martin Sheen running for President), and Johnny foresees that if he wins, disaster will ensue (you know, the nuclear kind).

Continue reading: The Dead Zone Review

Catch Me If You Can Review


Very Good
By 1967, Frank Abagnale Jr. (Leonardo DiCaprio) had become the youngest con man to make the FBI's "Most Wanted List." He'd cashed millions of dollars in forged checks, posed as a co-pilot for a major airline, landed a job as a surgeon in Atlanta, and passed the bar exam in New Orleans. At the time, he was barely old enough to drive.

So goes Catch Me If You Can, Steven Spielberg's second film of the year after the darker, more imaginative Minority Report. The director's cat-and-mouse game draws from Abagnale's autobiography and begins with the criminal's capture at the hands of FBI agent Carl Hanratty (Tom Hanks). The film then slowly backtracks six years to explain both how and why these two men wound up at this point. Part of it has to do with Frank's father (Christopher Walken), a smooth-as-silk seller with tax troubles. But most of it has to do with Frank's need to test his wits against inferior playmates.

Continue reading: Catch Me If You Can Review

Apocalypse Now Redux Review


Essential
Forget The Godfather. The sheer brilliance of Francis Ford Coppola lies in the images and words of his real masterpiece, Apocalypse Now. Twenty-two years ago, Coppola ventured into the jungles of the Philippines to shoot an adaptation of Joesph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, set against the turmoil and fury of the Vietnam War. Coppola assembled an impressive cast of actors -- 14 year-old Laurence Fishburne, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen (replacing Harvey Keitel), Dennis Hopper, Frederic Forrest, and the great Marlon Brando -- and set out to shoot a war epic. By the end, Coppola had lost 100 pounds, principal photography ran for 16 weeks, Martin Sheen had a heart attack, Brando demanded all of his shots be done in shadow, and Coppola had invested millions of his own money to keep the production going, all while threatening suicide numerous times. After all the pain, Apocalypse Now was finally revealed, exposing itself as one of the most amazing pieces of celluloid ever produced, capturing not only the ugliness and ridiculousness of Vietnam, but exposing the dark heart of man as well.

The end result: 8 Academy Award nominations (including Best Picture) and 2 wins for Cinematography and Score. Apocalypse Now additionally cemented Coppola's place as an A-plus-list film director, giving him free rein for the next 20 years to make crap like Captain Eo and Jack, junk which no one in Hollywood would dare criticize.

Continue reading: Apocalypse Now Redux Review

Gandhi Review


Extraordinary
In a society rife with Robin Williams waterworks and Ben Affleck angst, it's nice to have an occasional jolt of truth. Gandhi, while a couple of decades old now, still has that bold-faced honesty which we find so often lacking in many contemporary films.

Gandhi stars Ben Kingsley in a retelling of the life and times of revered Indian leader Mohandas Gandhi, renowned peace lover, sage, and all around worldly wise man. There is little told here that cannot be read in any history book, for Gandhi is not some sort of Hollywood trumped up, Pearl Harbored dramatization of history. Rather, it's just the facts, nothing but truth.

Continue reading: Gandhi Review

Catch-22 Review


Extraordinary
A wry and sarcastic (and thick as hell) book about the ridiculous duplicity of war? Sounds like a movie to me.

And so it did to Mike Nichols and Buck Henry, collaborators on The Graduate who conspired once again to make one of the greats of cinema. While Catch-22 has none of the cachet of other war movies (and we'll get to that...), it's by far one of the best out there, ranking with Platoon, Full Metal Jacket, and Apocalypse Now as one of the greats.

Continue reading: Catch-22 Review

Catch Me If You Can Review


Excellent

Steven Spielberg's best movie in at least a decade, "Catch Me If You Can" is a capricious, invigorating, infectiously jaunty caper about one of the most extraordinary con men in United States history.

In the mid-1960s, Frank Abagnale Jr. passed himself off as an airline pilot and fooled Pan Am, as a doctor and got a job as a Georgia hospital's graveyard-shift emergency room manager, and as a lawyer, becoming an assistant prosecutor in Louisiana under the wing of his unsuspecting fiancée's father.

And when he was finally caught -- after cashing millions of dollars in bogus checks to boot -- Frank Abagnale Jr. was all of 20 years old.

Continue reading: Catch Me If You Can Review

O Review


OK

William Shakespeare plays reinvented as modern-language high school movies have become a mini-genre unto themselves in the last few years. But the very fact that "10 Things I Hate About You" ("The Taming of the Shrew") and "Get Over It" ("A Midsummer Night's Dream") were comedies gave them some leeway from literary scrutiny. They were, after all, just for fun.

That kind of forgiveness is hard to apply to the awkward alterations that arise in Tim Blake Nelson's "O" -- an update of the treacherous tragedy "Othello," featuring a private school basketball hero standing in for the Moorish general driven to murdering his wife by a malicious, coldly calculating officer in his command.

Mekhi Phifer ("Soul Food," "Clockers") stars as Odin James, an inner-city import to highfalutin Palmetto Grove Academy. Odin has run afoul of Hugo (Josh Hartnett in the Iago role), a hoops teammate silently enraged by the feeling that his utilitarian talents are going unrecognized in Odin's long shadow -- even by the coach, Hugo's own father (Martin Sheen).

Continue reading: O Review

Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Martin Sheen Movies

Rules Don't Apply Trailer

Rules Don't Apply Trailer

Warren Beatty writes, directs and stars in the new movie Rules Don't Apply. Marla Mabrey...

Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping - Teaser Trailer

Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping - Teaser Trailer

With the passing of each decade, the music industry is constantly set alight by the...

Selma Movie Review

Selma Movie Review

One of the finest biopics in recent memory, this drama manages to present someone as...

Trash Movie Review

Trash Movie Review

With elements of political corruption and life-threatening prejudice, this film has a rather much darker...

Trash Trailer

Trash Trailer

Three friends, Raphael (Rickson Teves), Gardo (Eduardo Luis) and Rato (Gabriel Weinstein) from Brazil all...

Advertisement
The Amazing Spiderman 2 - Clips Trailer

The Amazing Spiderman 2 - Clips Trailer

Peter Parker is facing a period of deep confusion in every aspect of his life....

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Trailer

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Trailer

Peter Parker has always had difficulty trying to prioritise his life. There's the personal side...

Salinger Trailer

Salinger Trailer

J.D. Salinger - known to his friends as Jerry - is the mysterious author of...

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World Movie Review

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World Movie Review

There's a whiff of wilful quirkiness about this apocalyptic comedy-drama, but as the brittle humour...

The Amazing Spider Man Movie Review

The Amazing Spider Man Movie Review

Just 10 years after Sam Raimi's now-iconic Spider-man, Marvel has decided to tell the character's...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.