Mena Suvari Page 2

Mena Suvari

Mena Suvari Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

Mena Suvari , KATHLEEN YORK - Screening of FilmRise's 'Janis: Little Girl Blue' at Private Residence - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 8th November 2015

Mena Suvari and Kathleen York
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari and Guest
Mena Suvari and Guest
Mena Suvari and Guest
Mena Suvari and Guest

Mena Suvari - Mena Suvari out and about in Beverly Hills at beverly hills - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 7th October 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Delious Kennedy, Diane Warren, Robert Englund, Mena Suvari, Lucas Till , Ron Truppa - Catalina Film Festival Saturday September 26 2015 at Avalon Theater - Avalon, California, United States - Saturday 26th September 2015

Delious Kennedy, Diane Warren, Robert Englund, Mena Suvari, Lucas Till and Ron Truppa
Nancy Booth and Robert Englund
Robert Englund
Robert Englund
Ron Truppa and Robert Englund
Ron Truppa, Robert Englund and Delious Kennedy

Jennifer Chidester, Ron Truppa, Mena Suvari , Delious Kennedy - Catalina Film Festival Saturday Night Gala held at Avalon Theater - Arrivals at Avalon Theater - Avalon, California, United States - Saturday 26th September 2015

Jennifer Chidester, Ron Truppa, Mena Suvari and Delious Kennedy

Mena Suvari - Los Angeles premiere 'She's Funny That Way' at Harmony Gold - Arrivals at Harmony Gold - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 19th August 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Mena Suvari - Los Angeles Premiere of 'She's Funny That Way' at Harmony Gold - Red Carpet Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 19th August 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Mena Suvari - Women in Film Crystal and Lucy Awards 2015 - Arrivals at Century Plaza Hotel - Century City, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Mena Suvari - Women In Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Mena Suvari - Women In Film 2015 Crystal + Lucy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

Mena Suvari - Step Up Women's Network 12th Annual Inspiration Awards - Arrivals at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Friday 5th June 2015

Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari
Mena Suvari

American Reunion [aka American Pie: Reunion] Review


Weak
Call this a missed opportunity. While there's plenty of scope to have fun with these characters as they hit 30, this script is simply not up to the job. It's never very funny, has no sense of momentum and only comes to life due to the endearing characters and the likeable actors who play them.

It's the class of 1999's 13th reunion (huh?), so the entire gang returns to East Great Falls. Jim and Michelle (Bigs and Hannigan) now have a 2-year-old son, which has interrupted their sex life; Oz (Klein) is a B-list TV star with a supermodel girlfriend (Bowden); the now-married Kevin is worried about rekindling his high school romance with Vicky (Reid); Finch (Thomas) is a world traveler who clicks with Michelle's band camp pal Selena (Ramirez). And then there's party-boy prankster Stifler (Scott), who hasn't changed at all and leads them into all manner of trouble.

Continue reading: American Reunion [aka American Pie: Reunion] Review

Hemingway's Garden Of Eden Trailer


David and Catherine Bourne are newlyweds, for their honeymoon they decide to visit the beautiful French Riviera. The couple are inseparable, both willing to try new things and always looking for some excitement. After extending their honeymoon it doesn't take long for Catherine to become restless but she is soon appeased by an attractive Italian girl called Marita.

Continue: Hemingway's Garden Of Eden Trailer

Stuck Review


Extraordinary
Sometimes you're the windshield; sometimes you're the bug. But in Stuart Gordon's thoroughly nasty horror/comedy parable of the Bush era, Stuck, every character is a bug on the windshield of a hateful American society, some more so than others. And others literally so.

Take Tom (Stephen Rea, channeling Norman Wisdom through a manic depressive sheen). Tom has had a bad day. Thrown out of his fleabag apartment, he hopes to wrangle a job at the unemployment office but due to a computer error, his name doesn't appear in the computer, so he is forced to roam the streets as a homeless man. When he falls asleep on a park bench, a cop wakes him up and tells him to move on. As he pushes a shopping cart in front of him, he runs into Brandi (Mena Suvari). Or more to the point, Brandi runs into him. She is returning from a club in a drug-induced haze, happy that by working on her day off for her harpy boss at the depressing retirement home she will get a promotion from her deadening job as an attendant. But calling her lunkhead boyfriend Rashid (Russell Hornsby) on her cell phone on her drive home, she neglects to look at the road and smacks into the hapless Tom, who becomes stuck in the glass windshield of the car, bleeding to death. Rather than stop her vehicle and come to Tom's assistance, she drives onward home, parking her car in her garage and hoping Tom gives up the ghost during the night so that Brandi can ditch the body and not mess up her chances at a promotion when she goes in to work the next morning. The only glitch is that Tom refuses to die.

Continue reading: Stuck Review

Brooklyn Rules Review


Weak
Oh, brother. Or, as they say it in Brooklyn, oh, brudda. You've seen Brooklyn Rules before. Many times before. A cliché-clogged and utterly unsurprising mash-up of A Bronx Tale, Goodfellas, and even Saturday Night Fever (the Verrazano Bridge looms ominously in the background of many exterior shots), this coming-of-age tale tracks three best friends from Bay Ridge as they try to make a go of life in a Mob-run neighborhood. This town is so steeped in Mafia madness that even the most casual walk in the woods will ultimately lead to a cosa nostra killing field.

As teenagers in 1985 (cue the best-of-the-'80s soundtrack), Michael (Freddie Prinze, Jr.), Carmine (Scott Caan), and Bobby (Jerry Ferrara) are veering onto different paths. Bobby is the chubby and lovable lunkhead, so stupid he fears failing the Post Office application test. Carmine is the baby goodfella, a hyper stud who takes note of the money and respect that the local bosses have and can't imagine why he shouldn't join up with their crew. And Michael is the one who wants "to get out of this hellhole." An ambitious orphan, he's stumbling through Columbia on a pre-law track and has the hots for Connecticut preppie ice queen Ellen (Mena Suvari), who finds Michael's Brooklyn background attractively "edgy."

Continue reading: Brooklyn Rules Review

Factory Girl Review


Good
At the outset, Factory Girl looks like thin material for a biopic: It covers the life of Edie Sedgwick, a college dropout propelled to "it" girl status by Andy Warhol in the sixties, only to lose herself, as "it" people often do, to drugs and fresher faces. The movie starts with her leaving college, ends well before her death at age 28, and (intentionally or not) presents a convincing case that she didn't do much with the years in between.

But so many filmed biographies cram from childhood to old age, resulting in filmed Cliff Notes, or a mini-series at twice the speed and half the scenes. That Factory Girl doesn't have to cover an Edie Sedgwick comeback -- that she dies young and off-camera -- is a perverse relief. George Hickenlooper's brief, sometimes impressionistic film is most illuminating when showing both the allure and the casualties of Warhol's free but detached Factory scene.

Continue reading: Factory Girl Review

Stephen Tobolowsky's Birthday Party Review


Excellent
A casual search on filmcritic.com reveals the name "Tobolowsky" affiliated with at least 15 movies we've reviewed, and that's just counting the ones he had a big enough role to merit mention in the cast list.

Make this 16.

Continue reading: Stephen Tobolowsky's Birthday Party Review

Edmond Review


Weak
There's a slight chance, very slight, that David Mamet is a genius. As a writer, his blunt, edgy, and constantly interrupted dialogue has earned him a lot of weight, so much so that he is considered one of the more important playwrights of the last 25 years or so. As a director, he is precise and extremely-well calculated, if not a bit lacking in aesthetic substance and style. When he directs his own work, it tends to go remarkably smooth, as it did in the fantastic Heist and his best film, State and Main. However, when put in the hands of others, sometimes it goes exceedingly well (James Foster's Glengarry Glen Ross) or exceedingly bad (Michael Corrente's American Buffalo). The latest is a retelling of his play Edmond by King of the Ants helmer Stuart Gordon.On his way home from work, Edmond Burke (William H. Macy) decides to stop at a fortune teller. She simply tells him this: "You are not where you're supposed to be." This causes him to leave his wife (a brief Rebecca Pidgeon) and to go out on the town to get an old fashioned piece of tail, as suggested by a stranger at a bar (the reputable Joe Mantegna). He goes through strippers, booth girls and expensive call girls, played by a who's who of young actresses ranging from Mena Suvari to Denise Richards. He finally settles on a waitress (Julia Stiles) who he picks up after attacking a pimp and finding a newfound love for life. This passion, however, leads to a terrible act that lands him in jail and doing things that he was scared of before, constantly saying "every fear hides a wish."Mamet's sly style of writing somehow seems lacking here. In Glengarry, he wrote with blood and thunder about the rigorous work of real estate salesmen and in Oleanna, he split the sexual harassment debate so thinly that you couldn't see his opinion without microscope eyes. With Edmond however, he lays everything out for the audience and world to see, allowing the character to often pontificate on basic musings like what it's like to feel alive and the mundane nature of normal life. There is a serious lack of subtext that gives off the feeling of extreme annoyance.Gordon directs with a simple enough structuralism and he gives impressive terror to the climactic scene where Edmond goes over the edge. However, this simplicity also leads to a considerable loss in mood and atmosphere, which seems devoid after the excellent opening scene in the fortune teller's room. The actors, chiefly Macy and Stiles, struggle to keep the story afloat and exciting, but it's a losing battle. Reliable character actors like Bai Ling and Dylan Walsh (so good in Nip/Tuck) are given scant screen time to show their prowess, but Bokeem Woodbine works wonders as Edmond's bunkmate when he enters prison. None of this, however, allows Edmond to make more than a small ripple in the water. It's a fussy little movie that wants to be much more controversial and important than it is. Did I say those chances were very, very slight?The dead hooker's under the card in the middle.

Rumor Has It... Review


Terrible
Rumor Has It is the only 2005 release that I walked out of. It's really that bad. I am not exaggerating.Just saw it.

The Musketeer Review


Bad
And now the high-flying Hong Kong style of filmmaking has made its way down to the classics, and it isn't pretty. This time out the nod to Asia goes by way of France in the excruciating bland and lukewarm production of The Musketeer, a version of Dumas's The Three Musketeers. By bringing in popular Asian actor/stunt coordinator Xing Xing Xiong -- whose only prior American attempts at stunt choreography have been the laughable Van Damme vehicle Double Team and the Dennis Rodman cinematic joke Simon Sez -- our Musketeers are thrown into the air to do their fighting. The end result is a tepid and dull action/adventure rip-off that stinks of Indiana Jones and bad Asian kung fu.

The story is so simple my grandmother could have adapted the screenplay. D'Artagnan (Justin Chambers) is the vengeful son of a slain Musketeer. He travels to Paris to join the Royal Musketeers and find the man that killed his parents. In Paris, he meets the cunning Cardinal Richelieu (Stephen Rea), who is trying to overthrow the King, and Richelieu's man-in-black associate Febre (Tim Roth), the killer of his folks. He finds the Musketeers in Paris disbanded and drunk, so he rounds up Aramis (Nick Moran), Athos (Jan Gregor Kremp) and Porthos (Steven Spiers) to free the Musketeer's wrongfully imprisoned leader Treville from the King's prison. D'Artagnan and his new frisky love interest/chambermaid Francesca (Mena Suvari) play footsy and coo at each other as the Cardinal hunts down the Musketeers until finally the Queen (Catherine Deneuve) ends up being captured by the menancing Febre, forcing the Musketeers to regroup, with D'Artagnan leading the charge, and save the day.

Continue reading: The Musketeer Review

Loser Review


OK
If you're a cynic, you might wonder when Amy Heckerling (director of the utterly vapid Clueless) lost touch with the youth of America. I'm inclined to believe it was in 1982, right after the release of Fast Times at Ridgemont High, her only good movie, which she made when she was only 28.

Now in her mid-forties, it's rather depressing to see Heckerling using the same jokes that worked almost two decades ago. And for a movie that uses "Dare to be different" as its tagline, it's almost pathetic that this story is lifted virtually verbatim from Fast Times, with the Mark Ratner-Stacy Hamilton romance going awry once again. Brian Backer, who starred as Ratner, is even back in a small role.

Continue reading: Loser Review

American Beauty Review


Extraordinary
At last, a movie with no likable characters that is nothing short of a joy to watch. Let's see if American Psycho can top that!

American Beauty chronicles the last year in the life of 42 year-old hack magazine writer Lester Burnham (Spacey), a suburban loser that has just about had it with his humdrum life and decides to make a few changes to regain control, for better or for worse. Those changes include quitting his job and blackmailing his employers, buying a vintage Firebird, taking a new job at the local fast food joint, buying thousands of dollars worth of pot, and plotting to sleep with his daughter's best friend (Suvari, the good girl from American Pie, playing the bad girl here).

Continue reading: American Beauty Review

Snide And Prejudice Review


Weak
Quite an assembly of talent is ultimately wasted in this near-pointless look at a mental patient (that guy from the TV remake of Jason and the Argonauts) who thinks he's Hitler. A bunch of his fellow patients seem to think they're members of his staff, too. Essentially this is a re-imagining of Marat/Sade, adding in a head shrink (that guy from one of the Star Trek shows) who may be crazy too. Hitler's psychosis (the real Hitler, I mean) has been examined with substantially more depth and to a more powerful effect numerous times before.

Sonny Review


OK
He's a gigolo. She's a call girl. Together they're a pair of super-heroes that galavant around 1981 New Orleans. OK, everything but that super-hero part is true about Nicolas Cage's directorial debut, which gives us James Dean lookalike James Franco trying to change his ways and get a "normal" job, only to find out normal ain't all it's cracked up to be. Back to the housewives with ya, and now that Cage has the vanity project out of his system, he can go back to making more movies with Spike Jonze.

Trauma Review


Bad
Hey, just because you put Colin Firth in your movie doesn't mean it isn't total nonsense.

In the ill-advised Trauma, Firth tries his hand at, of all things, a psychological horror movie. His Ben wakes from a coma to discover that his wife has been killed in a car crash. He tries to get his life together in the creepiest apartment complex on earth, only to be haunted by a variety of visions, snoopy cops, and a plague of ants. Oh, and Mena Suvari lives down the hall.

Continue reading: Trauma Review

Live Virgin Review


Bad
See Mena Suvari... before she got her teeth fixed. Yikes, this snagglepuss chews up the scenery as she pits pornographer against pornographer. One wants to broadcast her deflowering (hence the title of the film), the other is her father!

Gosh, what would Donna Reed have done...

Continue reading: Live Virgin Review

Beauty Shop Review


OK
The laughs come fast and easy in "Beauty Shop," a sharp-tonguedspin-off from IceCube's "Barbershop"comedies that follows stylist Gina Norris (Queen Latifah) as she opensher own salon. But the minimal-effort plot keeps getting underfoot.

After performing peripheral duties in "Barbershop2: Back in Business," Gina has moved fromChicago to Atlanta in this picture so her daughter can attend a prestigiousperforming arts school. To pay for it she's been putting up with workingunder Jorge, the pompous, flamboyantly skanky owner of a ritzy downtownsalon -- played by Kevin Bacon with a gleefully bad Euro-trash accent andgreasy, over-highlighted hair in his eyes.

But as the movie opens, she's just about had enough. Packingup her scissors and you-go-girl self-confidence, she hooks a small bankloan and fixes up a neglected beauty shop on the edge of a rough neighborhood,where inherits a handful of mouthy stylists with chips on their shouldersand hopes for the best.

Following the successful "Barbershop" formula,the movie's strength is its colorful cast of characters for whom no topic-- from bikini waxes to Oprah Winfrey -- is off-limits to zingers and smartremarks. They range from the ever under-appreciated Alfre Woodard as aheritage-proud black hairdresser who knows a Maya Angelou quote for everyoccasion to Alicia Silverstone as a bumpkin shampoo girl (with an unconvincingsouthern accent) who leaves Jorge's with Gina and gets a ghetto makeoverafter slowly winning over her new co-workers.

Continue reading: Beauty Shop Review

American Beauty Review


Excellent

Every time I see a new Kevin Spacey movie, I expect the world from him, and every time he delivers the galaxy.

Arguably the greatest actor currently working in motion pictures, he is capable of putting across leagues of depth with the subtlest, most insignificant glance. He can play menacing or meek, ardent or indifferent, nervous or non-nonchalant with equal dexterity.

Look at "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil," "The Negotiator," "L.A. Confidential," "The Usual Suspects" or any of his recent roles and just try to imagine another actor in the part. It simply can't be done. Spacey doesn't act, he embodies his characters viscerally from the inside out.

Continue reading: American Beauty Review

American Pie 2 Review


Bad

Back from their freshman year at college, the sex-crazed gang from "American Pie" rent a beach house and party hardy for the summer in the inevitable assembly-line sequel "American Pie 2."

Pastry-plugging loser Jim (the insufferable Jason Biggs) is waiting for a visit from Swedish exchange sexpot Nadia (the vapid Shannon Elizabeth), whose interest in him still isn't adequately explained. Loud-mouthed lecher Stifler (Seann William Scott) is still obsessed with nailing anonymous bimbos. Finch (Eddie Kaye Thomas) is still obsessed with bedding Stifler's mom (Jennifer Coolidge).

Oz (Chris Klien) is still hopelessly devoted to Heather (Mena Suvari), who only shows up about three times in the movie, calling on the phone from Europe. Freaky flutist Michelle (Alyson Haningan) is back at band camp, where Jim pays a visit for sexual advice. Former virgin Kevin (Thomas Ian Nicholas) is pining for former virgin Vicki (Tara Reid), who has moved on.

Continue reading: American Pie 2 Review

Spun Review


OK

An entertaining but hideous romp on the circus side of crystal meth addiction, "Spun" wants to be another "Trainspotting" and/or "Requiem for a Dream." Inundated with trip-cam trickery that keeps the audience riding the ups and downs of the main character's drug buzzes, the film is nothing if not stylish, but falls short for lack of depth.

Music video guru and first-time feature director Jonas Akerlund makes liberal use of the disorienting, grainy, washed-out look of bleach-bypass photography. When Ross -- a downward-spiraling college dropout (played by Jason Schwartzman of "Rushmore" fame) on the leading edge of addiction but still clinging to his letter-jacket memories -- takes a hit of speed, the movie's tempo is fed a brief burst of shaky acceleration. A rapid montage of sensory-assault, nervous-tension images dance across the screen, sometimes in the form of cinematic hyper-awareness (e.g., fish-eye lens ultra-close-ups of chapped lips, bloodshot eyes and nervous-ticking fingers), sometimes in the form of animated, soddenly pornographic hallucinations.

The world of "Spun" is an acutely realized day-lit underground of ghetto shacks and combustible meth labs in cheap, airless hotel rooms (greatly enhanced by a hip-trippy score from the Smashing Pumpkin's Billy Corgan) in which all the characters seem acquiescently ensnared.

Continue reading: Spun Review

The Musketeer Review


Terrible

After all its TV commercial posturing about "re-envisioning" a classic as a post-Hong Kong actioner, "The Musketeer" betrays the truth of its utter lack of real ambition in the casting of a wooden, charmlessly handsome, totally generic Hollywood pretty boy in the title role.

His name is Justin Chambers (Jennifer Lopez's irritating Italian suitor in "The Wedding Planner"), and he looks and acts like he got the part only because Chris O'Donnell -- the industry's preferred choice for glinty-eyed, mannequin-souled heroes -- already played D'Artagnan in Disney's weightless 1993 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas' "The Three Musketeers."

Out to avenge the murder of his father some 14 years before, this D'Artagnan is "all for one" without the "one for all." Ostensibly, he ventures to Paris to join King Louis XIII's elite guard, only to find them disbanded and in disarray following a power shift that favored troops loyal to the power-mad Cardinal Richelieu (Stephen Rea).

Continue reading: The Musketeer Review

Mena Suvari

Mena Suvari Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Advertisement
Advertisement

Mena Suvari Movies

The Knot Movie Review

The Knot Movie Review

Clearly intent on being a British Hangover/Bridesmaids hybrid, this comedy romp doesn't contain a single...

You May Not Kiss The Bride Trailer

You May Not Kiss The Bride Trailer

Brian is a highly ordinary pet photographer who clashes with formidable Croatian crime kingpin Vadik...

Advertisement
American Reunion [aka American Pie: Reunion] Movie Review

American Reunion [aka American Pie: Reunion] Movie Review

Call this a missed opportunity. While there's plenty of scope to have fun with these...

American Pie: Reunion Trailer

American Pie: Reunion Trailer

When we last saw East Great Falls' Class of '99, they were celebrating the wedding...

Advertisement
Hemingway's Garden Of Eden Trailer

Hemingway's Garden Of Eden Trailer

David and Catherine Bourne are newlyweds, for their honeymoon they decide to visit the beautiful...

Edmond, Trailer Trailer

Edmond, Trailer Trailer

EdmondTrailer "You are not where you belong." Thus begins a brutal descent into a...

Brooklyn Rules Movie Review

Brooklyn Rules Movie Review

Oh, brother. Or, as they say it in Brooklyn, oh, brudda. You've seen Brooklyn Rules...

Caffeine Movie Review

Caffeine Movie Review

Something's always brewing at the Black Cat Café, or so they say. The advertisers behind...

Factory Girl Movie Review

Factory Girl Movie Review

At the outset, Factory Girl looks like thin material for a biopic: It covers the...

Factory Girl, Trailer Stream Trailer

Factory Girl, Trailer Stream Trailer

Factory GirlTrailer StreamNew ClipA beautiful, wealthy young party girl drops out of Radcliffe in 1965...

Edmond Movie Review

Edmond Movie Review

There's a slight chance, very slight, that David Mamet is a genius. As a writer,...

Rumor Has It... Movie Review

Rumor Has It... Movie Review

Rumor Has It is the only 2005 release that I walked out of. It's really...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.