Miranda Otto Page 2

Miranda Otto

Miranda Otto Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

Miranda Otto , Darcey O'Brien - Premiere Of Disney's "Alice Through The Looking Glass" at El Capitan Theatre, Disney - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 24th May 2016

Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien
Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien
Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien
Miranda Otto and Darcey O'brien

Darcey O'Brien , Miranda Otto - Premiere of Disney's 'Alice Through The Looking Glass' - Arrivals at Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 24th May 2016

Darcey O'brien and Miranda Otto

Atheer Adel, Rene Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic , F. Murray Abraham - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Atheer Adel, Rene Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic and F. Murray Abraham
Atheer Adel, Rene Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic and F. Murray Abraham
Miranda Otto

Atheer Adel, René Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic , F. Murray Abraham - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at The Shrine Expo Hall, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Atheer Adel, René Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic and F. Murray Abraham
Atheer Adel, René Ifrah, Miranda Otto, Alexander Fehling, Mark Ivanir, Sarah Sokolovic and F. Murray Abraham

Hilary Swank, Sonja Richter and Miranda Otto - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - 'The Homesman' premiere - Arrivals - Cannes, France - Sunday 18th May 2014

Hilary Swank, Sonja Richter and Miranda Otto
Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank

'I, Frankenstein' Fails To Raise Critics' Pulses


Aaron Eckhart Frankenstein Bill Nighy Yvonne Strahovski Miranda Otto Aden Young Caitlin Stasey

I, Frankenstein, the latest adaptation of Mary Shelley's classic novel, has been crushed by critics and no electrical cables or extra body parts seem likely to rebuild its reputation.

Aaron Eckhart
Aaron Eckhart stars as Adam, Frankenstein's monster.

The creators of the Underworld saga have contributed to this supernatural monstrosity, which is hardly surprising considering the standards of the latter movies in that particular franchise. The film is based on the graphic novel of the same name by Kevin Grevioux which places Frankenstein's monster in an alternative present day where gargoyles and demons struggle for dominance. 

Continue reading: 'I, Frankenstein' Fails To Raise Critics' Pulses

Miranda Otto - 2014 TCA Winter Press Tour FOX All-Star Party At The Langham Huntington Hotel and Spa - Pasadena, California, United States - Tuesday 14th January 2014

Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto

Miranda Otto - 3rd AACTA International Awards At Sunset Marquis Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 11th January 2014

Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto

Miranda Otto - AIF Breakthrough Awards - Arrivals - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Friday 25th October 2013

Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto
Miranda Otto

I, Frankenstein Trailer


Adam is the original creature created by Dr. Frankenstein 200 years ago and has taken on his maker's surname having been mourning his death for so long. He now returns to society having been hidden away in the North Pole for the last two centuries and finds that he is stronger than any other lifeform on the planet. However, he soon finds himself embroiled in a deadly battle between two different immortal forces of the world that are determined to take over the planet. Adam wants to save the human race that he was born into and that once showed him mercy, but how can he when he's one guy against so many unstoppable beings who are determined to destroy him no matter what?

'I, Frankenstein' is the thrilling fantasy adventure written and directed by Stuart Beattie ('Tomorrow, When the War Began', 'Australia', '30 Days of Night') and based on the as yet unpublished graphic novel by Kevin Grevioux. It acts as a sequel to the original 1818 gothic novel 'Frankenstein' by Mary Shelley, bringing Frankenstein's monster into a modern society that is under threat by more of his own kind. The film is set to be released in the UK on January 24th 2014.

Click Here To Read - I, Frankenstein Movie Review

Miranda Otto and Central Park Friday 17th August 2012 on the set of 'The Art of Losing' in Central Park

Miranda Otto and Central Park
Miranda Otto and Central Park
Miranda Otto and Central Park
Miranda Otto and Central Park
Miranda Otto and Central Park
Miranda Otto and Central Park

Miranda Otto - Sunday 13th June 2010 at Sydney Film Festival Sydney, Australia

Miranda Otto

The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review


Very Good
Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy? It's more hobbits, orcs, swords, and sorcery, so if you sawThe Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (and why would you be reading this if you hadn't?), you know what to expect.

And it's expectations that director Peter Jackson has clearly found himself having to address in this movie. Given that all three films in the series were shot simultaneously, Jackson doesn't have much opportunity to introduce new stuff with each movie. We're well familiarized with the main characters and the primary settings, so much of the weight falls on the new people and creatures introduced in this episode to carry the story.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship andThe Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

Close Your Eyes Review


OK
Michael Strother's more than just a hypnotherapist, he's also a psychic! And when you hypnotize a police detective who's trying to quit smoking and start seeing her cases in your mind, well, it's big trouble for our hero!

Goran Visnjic's Michael is a troubled soul, having moved from Europe to America and back again in hopes of escaping whatever demons come along with his strange powers. Too bad he keeps flapping his gums about children floating in bodies of water and so on -- obviously the curiosity of those who he prophesying for get a little curious. And so it comes that a detective (Shirley Henderson, not really cut out for this part) blackmails Michael into helping her out on a kidnapping case -- the young girl escaped her tormentors but she hasn't spoken since. Enter the mind reader to get to the bottom of things.

Continue reading: Close Your Eyes Review

Flight Of The Phoenix (2004) Review


Weak
Even if you're not familiar with the original 1965 version of this film, the title alone makes the outcome of this flight predictable. And while that may not suggest you should abort this journey completely, it just means Flight of the Phoenix must work harder to overcome its predictability. Be warned that it may not be worth the turbulent ride. Unlike the outcome of the fabled Phoenix, this story cannot resurrect itself.

This is surprising because this remake is considerably faithful to the plot of its predecessor. The story tells the plight of an eccentric group of underachieving oilrig workers who become stranded in Mongolia's Gobi Desert (the Sahara in the original) after their cargo plane crashes during a fierce sandstorm. There's very little water, and only a few cans of peaches to sustain their existence under the scorching desert summer sun. Despite their circumstances, the group decides to take their chances and, gulp, build a new plane in a desperate attempt to save themselves.

Continue reading: Flight Of The Phoenix (2004) Review

Danny Deckchair Review


OK
In the game of life, Danny Morgan (Rhys Ifans) is a checkers piece sitting on a chess board. At his construction site job, he spends more time in the cement mixer than he does on the girders. His solution to just about any problem, no matter how complicated, is to hold a pancake breakfast. And his current dream in life is to tie multiple helium balloons to his deckchair to see if he can get off the ground.

Danny Deckchair is an unchallenging romantic comedy that begins with its quirky character's balloon-and-chair experiment but never flies as high as the film's leading man. Writer/director Jeff Balsmeyer injects his script with the universal desire to fit in, to be accepted despite one's obvious faults. It's familiar territory and relatively harmless, for sure, but it's also humorless and lacking in those all important grains of logical sense.

Continue reading: Danny Deckchair Review

Love Serenade Review


Very Good
This quirky Aussie comedy was massively overshadowed by Muriel's Wedding, which preceded it by a year, but it's just as enjoyable. Miranda Otto steals the show in an early performance of the mousy sister of a shrewish hag (Rebecca Frith), who is instantly smitten when a radio DJ (George Shevstov) moves in next door. There's not much shaking in their remote community, so when the DJ picks Miranda first, an epic catfight/love triangle ensues. Lots of fun, though the supernatural third act comes out of nowhere and ruins a lot of what was built up earlier.

The Well Review


Good
Aussies know creepy, with movies like Picnic at Hanging Rock and The Piano (okay, Jane Campion's from New Zealand, but whatever). The Well takes creepy beyond these mildly disturbing pictures, shot entirely with a blue-tinted lens filter and dealing with a presumed dead man who's been tossed down a well.

Shades of I Know What You Did Last Summer notwithstanding, The Well explores what happens when two women -- one an older, crippled spinster (Pamela Rabe, who looks like a vaguely female Tom Wilkinson) and a young girl she takes into her home (Miranda Otto, who has the largest head on earth) -- conspire to dispose of a dead man who the young girl hits with their car during a joyride. He's sent down the titular dry well, only for the girl to hear him calling for food, light, and her love. Then there's the little matter of the women's money... which may very well have gone down the well also, hidden in the man's pockets.

Continue reading: The Well Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship and The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

Human Nature Review


Very Good
If nothing else, writer Charlie Kaufman has created a style of comedy all his own. He is one of the very few screenwriters able to distinctly stamp his unmistakable personality on a film. Much like his previous Being John Malkovich, Kaufman again has his script brought to the big screen by a music video/commercial director. This time French helmer Michel Gondry is behind the camera, and the result is every bit as uniquely offbeat and original as one might expect. The result being that Human Nature may be an acquired taste, but anyone who welcomes a dash of the avant-garde fused with their humor should take pleasure in this crazed, joyous romp of a film.

Patricia Arquette plays Lila, a best-selling environmental book author, who suffers from a hormonal disorder that causes her to sport an overabundance of body hair. Prior to finding success, the young woman learned to use the affliction as a source of strength and was able to get in touch with her true self while living in the wilderness for several years. Upon Lila's return to human civilization, she begins seeing an electrolysist named Louise (Rosie Perez) who helps her deal with the excess hair. She also introduces Lila to a brilliant, though maladjusted, behavioral scientist Nathan (Tim Robbins). A relationship soon blossoms.

Continue reading: Human Nature Review

The Healer Review


Good
Looking to go to bed depressed, moping, and on the verge of suicidal? Look no farther than The Healer, a pedigreed movie with such a dark core than it's no mystery it never merited a theatrical release of any consequence. (The original title, Julie Walking Home, couldn't have helped either.)

Canadian Julie (Miranda Otto) returns home from a trip with her two twin children, only to find husband Henry (William Fichtner) in bed with another woman. Like that, her marriage is ruined. Days later, she discovers her son (Ryan Smith) has cancer. Soon after that, we learn he's allergic to the chemotherapy. Julie just can't catch a break. Julie hears about a faith healer in Poland and decides to take her son there to get some healin'. (Why Poland? Could have something to do with writer/director Agnieszka Holland (Oscar nominated for Europa Europa in 1992), who hails from the country.)

Continue reading: The Healer Review

What Lies Beneath Review


Extraordinary
So far, this summer's supposed blockbusters could have used a free course on filmmaking from Robert Zemeckis.

Lesson number one: Take time to acclimate the audience to the characters. Unlike The Perfect Storm, What Lies Beneath completely absorbs the main character's personalities into the dramatic mix- frailties and all, through an intense look into their psyche, practically forcing the audience to become emotionally attached. This is not an original concept in cinema, but after watching Clooney and Wahlberg jump on that fishing boat and mournfully pronounce their goodbyes as if they already knew the ominous storm was on its way, you can't help but root for the ship to capsize.

Continue reading: What Lies Beneath Review

What Lies Beneath Review


Weak

Robert Zemeckis' self-indulgent direction hangs like an albatross around the celluloid neck of "What Lies Beneath," a soft-peddled yuppie horror flick that could have been -- with some fine tuning -- a sharp and genuinely scary thriller.

Forty minutes longer than necessary and featuring a cry-scream-and-run climax so drawn out that every ounce of tension evaporates from the screen half an hour before the credits roll, it's a frustrating movie to watch because of all the wasted potential.

Anything but a standard teens-in-peril slasher movie, "What Lies Beneath" stars Michelle Pfeiffer as a New England mom with empty nest syndrome after packing her daughter off to college in the opening scenes. Now alone in the house a lot, she becomes a busy body, spying on the new next door neighbors and witnessing what she thinks is a murder.

Continue reading: What Lies Beneath Review

Lord Of The Rings:
the Two Towers Review


Good

Unless you're a "Lord of the Rings" superfan, you'd better brush up on "Fellowship of the Ring" before seeing the sequel "The Two Towers," because director Peter Jackson just jumps right in to the middle of the story without much in the way of introductions or explanations.

He assumes you know who Hobbits Merry and Pippin are and why they've been abducted by the Uruk-Hai, the beastly minions of unseen supernatural villain Sauron (you know all about them, right?). He assumes you recall where "Fellowship" left off with human warrior Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) and Elfin archer Legolas (Orlando Bloom), and why they're trying to rescue Merry and Pippin.

He also assumes you know that hero Hobbits Frodo and Sam (Elijah Wood and Sean Austin) are still trying to reach the kingdom of Mordor, where they are to cast the dangerously omnipotent Ring into the volcanic fires of Mount Doom, thus keeping it out of the hands Sauron, who would use its dark psychic powers to lay waste to the world.

Continue reading: Lord Of The Rings:
the Two Towers Review

Flight Of The Phoenix Review


Weak

There are bound to be very few surprises in a movie that gives away its ending in the title. A remake of a 1965 Jimmy Stewart movie in which the survivors of a desert plane crash build a new makeshift aircraft from the wreckage of the old one, "Flight of the Phoenix" has no surprises at all.

From a guy showing pictures of his wife and kid (uh oh) before the doomed cargo plane even takes off to ferry workers home from a shut-down Gobi Desert oil rig, to the personality clashes as social order disintegrates, to the inspirational speeches that bring them all back together, everything in the story comes pretty much on cue. Even the band of desert marauders who turn up to threaten them arrives just in time to kick off the third act.

"Baby Boy"), the rig's project leader and token female (Miranda Otto, "Lord of the Rings"), the corporate stooge who shut her down (Hugh Laurie, Fox TV's "House"), and a gritty cultural cross-section of rig workers.

Continue reading: Flight Of The Phoenix Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Good

By the time hobbit hero Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) finally -- finally! -- struggles to the top of Mount Doom, where at the climax of "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" he must cast into its volcanic fires the malevolently omnipotent Ring that has been slowly consuming his psyche for three movies now, many of the nit-picky things that have gotten on my nerves throughout all the "Lord of the Rings" flicks had come to a head.

So many times now has Frodo's whiney, obsequious traveling companion Samwise Gamgee (Sean Austin) begun boo-hoo-hooing that I started rooting for him to be chucked into the lava along with the jewelry. One too many times has a lucky coincidence saved our hero, as when in this picture he's captured by the demonic, bad-tempered Orcs, only to be rescued moments later when his two guards -- the only two guards in an entire tower it seems -- are conveniently distracted by fighting with each other.

And once too often has director Peter Jackson assumed that the previous installments will be fresh in minds of the audience. That's a pretty safe bet for his fan base, but for the unobsessed, "Return of the King" -- like "The Two Towers" before it -- has many what-did-I-miss? moments. For example, in one of two climactic battle scenes, a never-identified army of fearsome face-painted foes riding atop gigantic elephants appears on the flank of the protagonists' battalion, prompting the question, "Who the heck are these guys?" (Apparently they were in the second movie too, but pardon me for not having seen it since last year.)

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

Miranda Otto

Miranda Otto Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Miranda Otto Movies

Annabelle 2 - Annabelle: Creation Trailer

Annabelle 2 - Annabelle: Creation Trailer

After the death of his daughter, doll maker Samuel Mullins had a crisis of self....

The Turning Trailer

The Turning Trailer

In 2005, Australian author Tim Winton collected a series of 17 short stories and published...

The Turning Movie Review

The Turning Movie Review

Life-changing moments feature in each of the nine short films in this Australian anthology, and...

The Homesman Movie Review

The Homesman Movie Review

Strong characters and a vivid sense of life in frontier America give this film a...

The Homesman Trailer

The Homesman Trailer

George Briggs is a claim jumper who has only ever known a dishonest life. When...

Reaching for the Moon Movie Review

Reaching for the Moon Movie Review

Based on a true story, this Brazilian drama has a lush authenticity as it tells...

I, Frankenstein Movie Review

I, Frankenstein Movie Review

Even with its relentlessly cliched production design (trenchcoats and flickering candles galore), this raucous gothic...

I, Frankenstein Trailer

I, Frankenstein Trailer

Adam is the original creature created by Dr. Frankenstein 200 years ago and has taken...

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The...

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Movie Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Movie Review

Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings...

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The...

Flight of the Phoenix (2004) Movie Review

Flight of the Phoenix (2004) Movie Review

Even if you're not familiar with the original 1965 version of this film, the title...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.