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Monica Bellucci - 'Spectre' film premiere in Madrid - Madrid, Spain - Wednesday 28th October 2015

Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci

Monica Bellucci - Monica Bellucci attends the 'Spectre' photocall in Madrid - Madrid, Spain - Wednesday 28th October 2015

Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci

Daniel Craig, Monica Bellucci, Sam Mendes , Christoph Waltz - 007 Spectre attend photocall at ST. Renis Grandi Hotel in Rome at St. Regis Hotel Rome - Rome, Italy - Tuesday 27th October 2015

Daniel Craig, Monica Bellucci, Sam Mendes and Christoph Waltz
Daniel Craig
Daniel Craig
Daniel Craig
Daniel Craig
Daniel Craig

Lea Seydoux, Daniel Craig , Monica Bellucci - World Premiere of 'Spectre' attended by HRH Prince William Duke of Cambridge, HRH Katherine, Duchess of Cambridge and HRH Prince Harry in aid of the CTBF and held at the Royal Albert Hall, Kensington, London at Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Monday 26th October 2015

Lea Seydoux, Daniel Craig and Monica Bellucci

Lea Seydoux , Monica Bellucci - Royal Film Performance of 'Spectre' at Royal Albert Hall - Red Carpet Arrivals at Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Monday 26th October 2015

Lea Seydoux and Monica Bellucci
Lea Seydoux
Lea Seydoux
Lea Seydoux
Lea Seydoux
Lea Seydoux

Monica Bellucci - Royal film performance of 'Spectre' at Royal Albert Hall - Red Carpet Arrivals at Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Monday 26th October 2015

Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Lea Seydoux, Daniel Craig and Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Lea Seydoux, Daniel Craig and Monica Bellucci
Lea Seydoux, Daniel Craig and Monica Bellucci

Monica Bellucci, Lea Seydoux , Daniel Craig - Royal film performance of 'Spectre' at Royal Albert Hall at Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Monday 26th October 2015

Monica Bellucci, Lea Seydoux and Daniel Craig
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci

Video - Chiwetel Ejiofor And His Girlfriend Sari Mercer Seen Leaving NY Hotel For Met Gala - Part 3


'12 Years A Slave' star Chiwetel Ejiofor with his model girlfriend Sari Mercer were among the stunningly dressed celebrities snapped leaving their New York hotel to attend the 2014 Costume Institute Gala where this year's theme was 'Charles James: Beyond Fashion'.

Continue: Video - Chiwetel Ejiofor And His Girlfriend Sari Mercer Seen Leaving NY Hotel For Met Gala - Part 3

Monica Bellucci - 'Charles James: Beyond Fashion' Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art - Outside Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 6th May 2014

Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci

Designers Dolce And Gabbana Sentenced To Prison For Tax Evasion (Sort Of)


Monica Bellucci

Global fashion house Dolce and Gabbana's founders Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbanna have been sentenced to 1 year 8 months (suspended) in jail following an investigation and subsequent trail into their evasion of taxes.

The investigation into D&G by Italian police began six years ago, following a government decision to crack down on tax evasion. Dolce and Gabbana were initially convicted in 2011 but the decision was appealed and over-ruled.

Prosecuters at the trial believe the pair has evaded taxation on their earnings of 416 million Euros and a further 200 million euros which they moved to their Luxembourg based company Gado. The judge ruled the company officially move to the tax haven of Luxembourg in 2004 and their shares in it were bought at less than market value.

Continue reading: Designers Dolce And Gabbana Sentenced To Prison For Tax Evasion (Sort Of)

Monica Bellucci - Monica Bellucci and Belcim Bilgin Wednesday 12th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Rhino Season' photo call at TIFF Bell Lightbox.

Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci

The Sorcerer's Apprentice Review


Good
It's not like we expect anything else from Bruckheimer: this is a loud, wacky, effects-laden extravaganza that's short on plot, characterisations and any real tension. But it's also rather mindless good fun.

One of Merlin's apprentices, Balthazar (Cage), has been searching for Merlin's heir for nearly three thousand years, finally locating him in New York City in physics geek Dave (Baruchel). Doubtful but intrigued, Dave learns that Balthazar's ex-colleague Horvath (Molina) is determined to resurrect the evil Morgana (Krige) to destroy humanity. But Dave is badly preoccupied by the fact that the girl (Palmer) he has loved since age 9 is suddenly showing him some interest. Can't this world-saving business wait?

Continue reading: The Sorcerer's Apprentice Review

The Sorcerer's Apprentice Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Sorcerer's Apprentice

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The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review


Excellent
As a more emotional take on the themes examined in American Beauty, this internalised drama is subtle and unpredictable. It also features terrific performances from an eclectic cast.

Pippa (Wright) is married to the much-older Herb (Arkin), a publisher who hates that he's now retired. But it's Pippa whose world is starting to unravel, as she reaches the point where she needs more than being a trophy wife and mother to two now-grown kids (Kazan and McDonald). Her sleepwalking antics indicate that her subconscious has already figured this out, but it'll take a look at her childhood (played by Lively and youngster Madeline McNulty) to help her see what she needs to do next.

Continue reading: The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review

Nicolas Cage and Monica Bellucci Nicolas Cage and Monica Bellucci film a romantic scene in The Sorcerer's Apprentice at a park in Manhattan.

Nicolas Cage and Monica Bellucci
Nicolas Cage and Monica Bellucci

Shoot 'Em Up Review


Excellent
Presenting the recipe for a Shoot 'Em Up cocktail: Mix together a shot each of John Woo, Chuck Jones, and Run Lola Run, a dash of Sergio Leone and the Coen Brothers, add a twist of John Cassavetes' Gloria, shake vigorously and pour.

Michael Davis' Shoot 'Em Up is a giddy, deranged, pumped-up theme park ride in Bullet Land where the bullets fly like rain, bodies drop like hail, and carrots are used as lethal weapons.

Continue reading: Shoot 'Em Up Review

Irréversible Review


Bad
It's hard to imagine a more unpleasant film than Irréversible, a tale of sexual and physical violence that pulls out all the stops in attempting to shock its audience. The new film by French filmmaker Gaspar Noé - whose last feature, I Stand Alone, boasted a 30-second warning countdown before its graphic finale - is determined to rub our noses in the horrid realities of life, kicking things off with a nauseating murder and culminating in a revolting nine-minute rape sequence that garnered intense controversy at the film's 2002 Cannes Film Festival debut. Noé wants us to sit transfixed on the horrific because he's convinced that, by making us do so, he is exposing our naïve bourgeois minds to the grim, unforgiving "real" world. We are the students, he the teacher, and one can imagine Noé, as well as the film's admirers, arguing that those who don't like (or get) the film are simply sheltered ignoramuses afraid to admit that life isn't as warm and cozy as we think it is.

The supposed wisdom imparted by Irréversible is, unfortunately, wholly unoriginal in theory and decidedly odious in practice. To Noé, man is, regardless of his civilized facade, a vicious animal driven by primitive instincts. Homosexuality and femininity are the enemies of masculinity, and should be treated with suspicion and disgust. The modern world, and Paris in particular, is a cesspool of vice and depravity. And the only way to fully convey these themes is to depict them unflinchingly, without restraint or decency. The film, like far too many recent French imports (Baise-moi, Romance), mistakenly embraces blunt shock tactics as the surest means of capturing artless reality.

Continue reading: Irréversible Review

Remember Me, My Love Review


Good
Italian Beauty? Even more so than in his previous film, The Last Kiss, Gabriele Muccino's story of despair and decay in an outwardly normal Roman household apes domestic forebears like American Beauty almost too closely. Still, to claim suburban ennui as a distinctly American experience would be hubris at its worst, so let's give Muccino his stab at the genre.

In this outing, all four family members are dropped right in the middle of their respective crises: Dad (Fabrizio Bentivoglio) is rekindling an affair with an old girlfriend (played by Monica Bellucci, who could possibly blame him?), while Mom (Laura Morante) is tentatively dipping a toe into the world of acting. Sis Valentina (Nicoletta Romanoff) is the proto-teen who hates everything and dresses like a whore -- and she's trying to become a dancer on TV... and what good could come of that? Then there's brooding Paolo (Silvio Muccino, Gabriele's kid brother and a regular in his films), who can't score with the girls and seems on the verge of suicide from frame one.

Continue reading: Remember Me, My Love Review

The Brotherhood Of The Wolf Review


Bad
Brutal. Ugly. Predictable. Boring. Stereotypical. Comical. Violent. Lethargic. Seven words to describe the hellish cinema experience of The Brotherhood of the Wolf. Alas, I forgot two more epitaphs: disappointing and plagiaristic.

The Brotherhood of the Wolf has all of the makings of a great French epic. Dashing leading men including Vincent Cassel (The Crimson Rivers), voluptuous women such as Emilie Dequenne and Monica Bellucci, a promising storyline packed full of complex, daunting elements of suspense and mystery, and impressive production values clearly evident in costuming and set design. The problem is that this film is about as French in style and execution as McDonald's French fries.

Continue reading: The Brotherhood Of The Wolf Review

She Hate Me Review


Weak
She Hate Me borrows its title from "He Hate Me," a.k.a. Rod Smart of the XFL (the now-defunct WWE-sponsored extreme football league), but just as this pointless non-sequitur of a title has nothing to do with the film it adorns, Spike Lee's latest tosses together largely unrelated social commentary, broad humor, and nonsensical racial and sexual stereotypes in a vain attempt to critique modern-day romance and big business. Beginning with close-ups of billowing U.S. currency which culminate in the image of a George W. Bush-decorated three-dollar bill, and ending with a goofy "go forth and procreate, young man" rallying cry for its whorish African-American protagonist, the film is structured like a series of punch lines aimed squarely at what Lee sees as America's racist, corrupt white power structure. Too bad its story - about courageous whistle-blowing, lesbian procreation, and a black man's need to stand up, take responsibility for his actions, and do the right thing - doesn't do almost anything right.

Lee's initial target for censure is the crooked corporate culture that fosters brazenly greedy and duplicitous companies such as Enron and Worldcom. Jack Armstrong (Anthony Mackie) is a vice president at a pharmaceutical company whose new HIV cure has been rejected by the FDA. When he discovers a conspiracy orchestrated by the corporation's arrogant, racist CEO (Woody Harrelson) and his ruthless Martha Stewart-ish boss (Ellen Barkin) to cook the books and keep employees and shareholders in the dark about the new drug's ineffectiveness, Jack rats out his superiors to the SEC, and the price for betraying "the family" is immediate dismissal. As luck would have it, though, a new money-making venture falls directly into his, ahem, lap - his ex-fiancé Fatima (Kerry Washington), who left him for another woman, now wants to pay him $10,000 to impregnate her and her Dominican girlfriend. Before long, Armstrong - in some sort of filthier version of the Patrick Dempsey '80s cult classic Loverboy - is occupying his time spreading his seed through NYC's upper-crust lesbian community (which includes Monica Bellucci as a Mafioso don's daughter) for wads of cash.

Continue reading: She Hate Me Review

Malèna Review


Terrible
Even the great can stumble. Giuseppe Tornatore (Cinema Paradiso) adapted his new film Malèna from a story by Luciano Vincenzoni (The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly), yet the whole thing comes off like a loud and humorless ripoff of Federico Fellini's Amarcord.

The story is seen through the eyes of a 13-year-old boy named Renato (Giuseppe Sulfaro ), who is growing up in a small Sicilian village during the World War II. For a good three-fourths of the film, the local beauty Malèna (Monica Bellucci), the object of desire for the entire village, monotonously parades through streets and piazzas with cow-like indifference, followed by Renato and his gang of friends.

Continue reading: Malèna Review

Under Suspicion Review


Good
It's an interesting box drama, and given its huge stars -- Morgan Freeman and Gene Hackman -- it's amazing this is a "First on Max" thriller. Hackman plays a tax attorney in Puerto Rico who discovers a strangled girl's body on his morning run. He is brought in to answer "just a few questions," but soon it becomes clear he is the prime suspect. Or is he being framed? Is his gorgeous wife (Monica Belucci) involved? Maybe the cops?

The use of flashbacks is interesting and unique -- replaying scenes over and over with a different spin. And the film truly keeps you guessing, though it goes out of the way to make Hackman look guilty. But what's up with the nonsense ending?

Continue reading: Under Suspicion Review

The Passion Of The Christ Review


Extraordinary
Detractors have spent months condemning Mel Gibson's labor of faith, The Passion of the Christ. Many protest its abundant gore and relentless violence. The loudest arguments rally against the film's reported anti-Semitic stance. Gibson tried to answer his critics, but his defensive statements only sprinkled more gasoline on the already raging flames of controversy.

Now that the film is out, it finally can speak for itself. And as it turns out, some of the arguments are valid. Passion, which arduously depicts the final hours of Jesus Christ, contains brutal scenes of torture that linger for an eternity. And Gibson does limit his narrative to Jesus' conviction and crucifixion, with occasional fleeting reminders of significant events such as the last supper or the Sermon on the Mount.

Continue reading: The Passion Of The Christ Review

The Matrix Reloaded Review


Excellent
In 1999, Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne) uttered memorably, "Unfortunately, no one can be told what the Matrix is."

In 2003, no one needs to be told, because everyone fully knows what the Matrix is. The idea of the Matrix has entered the popular lexicon. Magazines, with utter seriousness, create polls asking whether readers think we are really living in the Matrix. And people say yes, apparently unable to realize that it is only a movie.

Continue reading: The Matrix Reloaded Review

Dracula (1992) Review


Very Good
Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of the Dracula story hasn't won any praise for its claim of being true to Bram Stoker's novel (despite the aka title, Bram Stoker's Dracula), but it is a huge success in one major front: Casting. Coppola has lined up a near-perfect cast, one which is actually inspired on some fronts. For starters, Gary Oldman makes for what may be the most memorable Dracula ever (I challenge you to name another besides Bela Lugosi), and Anthony Hopkins' Van Helsing is an intriguing -- and solid -- choice. It gets even better in the smaller roles: Richard E. Grant as a physician friend of Van Helsing, Bill Campbell as a gunslinging Texan who's wooing Miss Lucy (Sadie Frost in an absurd red wig), and -- best of all -- Tom Waits as a jibbering disciple of Dracula, locked away in an asylum. And watch for Monic Bellucci as one of Dracula's brides. Altogether it's a fun movie, full of gore and special effects that were groundbreaking at the time.

Tears Of The Sun Review


Very Good
A priest, two nuns, and an American doctor tend to wounded refugees in a Nigerian mission. No, this isn't the first line from one of your grandfather's old jokes. It's the launch pad for Antoine Fuqua's Tears of the Sun, a proper military potboiler that catapults blue-collar Bruce Willis back into the hero seat he's grown accustomed to over the years.

Civil war is tearing Nigeria in two. Without warning, the country's president is overthrown by infidels, who assassinate the deposed leader along with his immediate family. Amidst the political upheaval, our government orders a U.S. Navy SEAL platoon led by Lt. A.K. Waters (Willis) to infiltrate the African jungles and extract Dr. Lena Kendricks (Monica Bellucci) and her assistants.

Continue reading: Tears Of The Sun Review

The Brothers Grimm Review


Weak

There could be no one better than Terry Gilliam to direct a tongue-in-cheek supernatural thriller set in a world of fairytales.

Unfortunately, in "The Brothers Grimm" -- a movie with a Terry Gilliam look and feel but without a Terry Gilliam soul -- the eccentric genius behind "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," "12 Monkeys" and "Brazil" seems to have had his spirit broken by studio mandates (like a hottie love interest) and commercial constraints (like a curtailed run time).

Set in French-occupied Germany during the early 19th century, the fable-warping story reinvents the the legendary Grimms as good-natured con artists, who only later became authors, immortalizing the likes of Snow White, Rumpelstiltskin and the Golden Goose by putting their own famous dark-candy spin on familiar folk tales. Here wily huckster Wilhelm (Matt Damon) and frustrated idealistic scholar Jakob (Heath Ledger) are traveling snake-oil salesmen, exploiting local superstitions, staging theatrical hauntings, then peddling their services as ghost busters.

Continue reading: The Brothers Grimm Review

The Matrix Reloaded Review


Weak

Here's your review of "The Matrix Reloaded" in a nutshell: One incredibly cool, gravity-defying, CGI-aided, swirling-camera kung-fu melee; one jaw-dropping, 100-mph, against-traffic freeway chase; and way, way too much long-winded, expository, circular, self-important, pseudo-philosophical yappity-yappity-yap.

Writing-directing brothers Larry and Andy Wachowski saddle their cast with endless equivocal prattle while toiling to buttress the complex plot and metaphysical undertone of this picture's uber-stylish 1999 predecessor, which saw what we think is the real world exposed as an elaborate virtual reality prison for the minds of all humanity. Mankind's suspended bodies provide a power source for a race of machines, which a small band of escapees are hoping to destroy in the post-apocalyptic world outside the Matrix.

"We can never see past the choices we don't understand," sage but elusive cyber-prophet The Oracle (Gloria Foster) preaches cryptically to Neo (Keanu Reeves), the cyber-Messianic hero whose realization that physical laws don't apply in the Matrix led to the first film's groundbreaking wire-work martial arts fights and bullet-dodging slow-mo stunts.

Continue reading: The Matrix Reloaded Review

The Passion Of The Christ Review


Good

Beyond Jesus's inner circle of Disciples, relatives and Mary Magdalene, there's barely a single sympathetic character in the entirety of devoted director Mel Gibson's passion project "The Passion of The Christ."

Pontius Pilate, the tyrannical Roman governor on whose word the crucifixion went forward, gets a pass as a conflicted guy who was just doing his job -- killing Jesus to prevent a rebellion from a mob of frenzied Jews angry over his perceived as blasphemous preachings. Pilate's wife Claudia is a convert and therefore shown in a good light. There's a Jewish girl who tries to give Jesus water as he carries the cross on which he'll die through the streets of Jerusalem and a peasant father who has a religious epiphany by helping the now beaten bloody Jesus carry said cross.

Aside from a few people crying as Jesus is dragged past them, that's about it. Everyone else in this film seems to be a villain -- be they Roman guards who laugh maniacally (like James Bond movie henchmen) while whipping Jesus until his shredded skin looks like bloody, lumpy oatmeal, or be they Jewish hoards whipped into a frenzy by temple leaders, or be they the viciously evangelical rabbis themselves, whose spiteful rhetoric against his "heresy" sounds an awful lot like what still to this day comes from behind some pulpits and political podiums.

Continue reading: The Passion Of The Christ Review

The Matrix Revolutions Review


OK

The eye-popping, heart-stopping last hour and a half of "The Matrix Revolutions" more than makes up for everything plodding and ponderous that has taken place since the mind-blowing first hour of the 1999 original.

Astonishing in scale and momentous in scope, it encompasses a spectacular battle between the scrappy, out-numbered but heavily armed defenders of Zion (humanity's last refugee city hidden deep beneath the Earth's scorched surface) and a million-strong swarm of enemy sentinels (those frightening, giant squid-shaped robots) invading from the machine-ruled surface world.

But the monstrous melee may be for naught if uber-human messiah Neo (Keanu Reeves) cannot defeat the invincibly evil, incalculably self-replicating rogue computer program known as Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) in a simultaneous, nuclear-strength airborne-kung-fu showdown inside what's left of the crumbling Matrix (that virtual world pulled over the eyes of the comatose majority of mankind kept in stasis by the machines who feed off our life-force).

Continue reading: The Matrix Revolutions Review

Monica Bellucci

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Monica Bellucci

Date of birth

30th September, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.71




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Monica Bellucci Movies

James Bond - Spectre Movie Review

James Bond - Spectre Movie Review

For his latest adventure, James Bond mixes the personal drama of Skyfall with the vintage...

Spectre Trailer

Spectre Trailer

James Bond has never played by the rules, but this time he may have gone...

Spectre Trailer

Spectre Trailer

It seems James Bond's flighty career has all boiled down to this moment. He's in...

Spectre - Teaser Trailer

Spectre - Teaser Trailer

Picking up after the climactic battle at his childhood home of Skyfall Lodge and the...

The Sorcerer's Apprentice Movie Review

The Sorcerer's Apprentice Movie Review

It's not like we expect anything else from Bruckheimer: this is a loud, wacky, effects-laden...

The Sorcerer's Apprentice Trailer

The Sorcerer's Apprentice Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Sorcerer's Apprentice Balthazar Blake is a powerful sorcerer, and he's...

The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Movie Review

The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Movie Review

As a more emotional take on the themes examined in American Beauty, this internalised drama...

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Shoot 'Em Up Movie Review

Shoot 'Em Up Movie Review

Presenting the recipe for a Shoot 'Em Up cocktail: Mix together a shot each of...

Irréversible Movie Review

Irréversible Movie Review

It's hard to imagine a more unpleasant film than Irréversible, a tale of sexual and...

The Brotherhood of the Wolf Movie Review

The Brotherhood of the Wolf Movie Review

Brutal. Ugly. Predictable. Boring. Stereotypical. Comical. Violent. Lethargic. Seven words to describe the hellish cinema...

She Hate Me Movie Review

She Hate Me Movie Review

She Hate Me borrows its title from "He Hate Me," a.k.a. Rod Smart of the...

Malèna Movie Review

Malèna Movie Review

Even the great can stumble. Giuseppe Tornatore (Cinema Paradiso) adapted his new film Malèna...

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