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Peter O'Toole Wednesday 19th March 2008 World Premiere of 'The Tudors: Season 2' - Arrivals

Peter O'toole
Peter O'toole
Peter O'toole

Peter O'Toole Wednesday 19th March 2008 World Premiere of 'The Tudors - Season 2' at Sheraton Hotel New York City, USA

Peter O'toole
Peter O'toole
Peter O'toole

Peter O'Toole Tuesday 11th March 2008 The 2008

Peter O'toole
Peter O'toole
Peter O'toole

The Ruling Class Review


Good
Too long, too willfully oddball, too full of obvious critiques of the British upper crust, Peter Medak's 1972 film The Ruling Class is still fairly enjoyable as a showcase for Peter O'Toole. As Jack Gurney, the heir to an earldom, he completely throws himself into the role of a man gone completely mad; convinced he's God, he sleeps on a crucifix, wears his hair at a Christlike length, and make loud and unhinged proclamations about the state of the universe. Jack's mental state troubles his uncle, Sir Charles Gurney (William Mervyn), but only because he's angry that the previous earl left him out of the will, and he plots to have Jack cured, or at least to hook him up with his mistress, Grace (Carolyn Seymour), in the hopes of producing a sane heir.

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Club Paradise Review


Bad
Before "celebrity" reality shows, ensemble comedies were the lifelines that kept failing showbiz careers from bottoming out. This subgenre was like a post-Thanksgiving meal concocted of small quantities of disparate leftovers. It was never particularly good, but if one dish didn't taste good, at least you had a dozen other Tupperwares to open.

Club Paradise is a prototypical specimen, starring a dozen actors in career lulls, including Mork, Twiggy, a gaggle of Second City vets, Jimmy Cliff, and even Lawrence of Friggin' Arabia. A word of warning: these leftovers are rotten.

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My Favorite Year Review


Excellent
Here's a funny little number based, as it happens, on a night in the life of Errol Flynn, when he showed up drunk to appear on Sid Caesar's variety show. O'Toole plays a Flynn-esque swashbuckler, Bologna is faux Sid, and Linn-Baker (pre Perfect Strangers) is their go-between. Touching and altogether happy, this is an easy Favorite.

Lawrence Of Arabia Review


Essential
Being the self-proclaimed professional film critic that I am, I am somewhat embarrassed to admit that I had not seen Lawrence of Arabia (just out in a special DVD edition) until only recently. After all, it's considered by just about everyone to be the masterpiece epic of director David Lean, who also directed films such as Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago. So one day, a friend of mine loaned me a copy of the video and I sat down and watched it. I was initially skeptical that something made almost 40 years ago would be able to keep my attention for the butt-numbing 3 1/2 hours of its duration. But now I fully understand why this has become the film that other epic films are judged against -- the winner of seven Academy Awards in 1963 for Best Picture, Director, Editing, Cinematography, Art Direction, Music, and Sound. After watching the film again, I am convinced that it is simply one of the finest works of cinematic genius to ever illuminate the big screen.

Based on the autobiographical writing of British officer T.E. Lawrence during World War I, Lawrence of Arabia depicts Lawrence (played by then-unknown actor Peter O'Toole) as a lieutenant lacking any sort of military discipline whatsoever. Bored with his assignment of coloring maps for the British Army in a dimly lit headquarters building, Lawrence jumps at the opportunity to be re-assigned as an observer for an Arabian prince fighting against the Turkish army. Lawrence quickly sees just how caring and great these desert dwelling people can be and ends up rallying the various tribes together to fight the Turks and help the British turn the tide of World War I.

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Caligula Review


Weak
Hokey doesn't even begin to describe it. Take A Clockwork Orange and remove all the clothes, triple the violence, and roll the clock back 2000 years, and you've got an approximation of the Roman Caligula, the only film where the orgies are bigger than the war scenes. Oh yeah, get rid of the plot altogether. Maybe through in some more boobs... yeah, that's Caligula. Only from Guccione and Penthouse...

High Spirits Review


Bad
Steve Guttenberg falls in love with a ghost. Sounds about right.

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The Stunt Man Review


Essential
From the very first shot -- of an eagle sitting on a light pole -- to the very last scene, The Stunt Man is the most exuberant piece of kinetic filmmaking ever produced. I daresay it's also one of the best American films of the 1980s, and, ironically, one of the most overlooked and unknown. Moreover, at a danger of sounding banal, I have to confess that it is one of my favorite films of all time. The Stunt Man is a film about making a film, a motion picture that generates a riveting, scintillating spell and, like no other film, exemplifies everything that cinema is: illusion, make-belief, obsession, control, and romance.

The film follows Cameron (Steve Railsback), a former Vietnam soldier, who is sought by the police and FBI. He is a street-smart savage and a criminal with unblinking tension in widened, wild eyes. Even motionless, he seems to be running from something. Soon he's on the run from the cops, and finds himself witnessing the shooting of a film. When the scene is over and the director, Eli Cross (Peter O'Toole), descends from the helicopter, the camera is looking at him from down below -- he is at once God and Devil, and he brings with him an air of greatness and unfathomable mystery. Peter O'Toole is brilliant in a role of megalomaniacal film director: He is imperial, bitter-tongued and controlling. He carries his madness in the blue arrogance of his eyes, in the deep wrinkles of his face and sinister sleeves of his black turtleneck. When he is looking down on Cameron from the helicopter's window, he seems to be gazing right into Cameron's soul. They strike a deal and Cameron becomes someone else -- a stunt man, an actor, and a fugitive -- in the movie. If he works it all out, it could mean having one more chance to lose, and Richard Rush exploits the twists and turns of Cameron's adventures with exuberance and unpredictable inventiveness.

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The Lion In Winter Review


Excellent
There's something terribly fascinating about the ruthless intrigue which takes place within a royal court. Think of the shifting allegiances in the recent Elizabeth or the diabolical conspiracies and ingenious assassinations of those ruthless Frenchmen in Queen Margot. Ah, yes -- those elaborate costume-dramas where the powerful survive by wit, cunning, a chess player's penchant for strategy, and the indelible art of the double-cross.

Watching these cinematic treats is nothing short of delicious. Since revenge is a dish best served cold, it seems appropriate that the grand dame of these films takes place in the bleak midwinter of 1183, when the royal family has gathered for the Christmas holidays.

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Rock My World Review


Weak
An old English couple poses as servants and allows an American rock band to stay at their country estate for a week. This ridiculous story just about scrapes bottom when Alicia Silverstone applies glitter makeup to the face of Joan Plowright. Pity Peter O'Toole, who is so far above this material and yet takes everything in stride. He almost makes the movie worth watching for his stuffy butler performance.

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Troy Review


OK

For moviegoers anxious to see Brat Pitt, Orlando Bloom and Eric Bana oiled up and sweaty in various states of undress, Hollywood's handsome, aggrandized, $200-million-plus swords-and-sandals epic "Troy" has a lot to offer -- a whole lot to offer.

For those seeking a "Gladiator"-style, thinking-person's summer action movie, the film is on shakier ground -- and for folks more interested in watching the Trojan War of Homer's "Iliad" brought to life, brace yourselves for disappointment.

Screenwriter David Benioff ("25th Hour") takes many, many liberties with his source material, some of which are creative and shrewd, like using the mistaken-identity battlefield death of Achilles' look-alike cousin to imply how legends of the warrior's immortality spread in this version of the story which is devoid of gods, demigods and such mythology.

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Bright Young Things Review


Very Good

"Bright Young Things" is a terribly witty romp through 1930s pre-war London with a pack of idle young swells who live scrumptious but superficial lives of joyous gossip-page decadence and complacent scandal that has the potential to ruin them.

Very cleverly adapted (from Evelyn Waugh's novel "Vile Bodies") and directed by the gifted comedic actor Stephen Fry ("Wilde," "Peter's Friends"), our surrogate in this world is Adam Symes (newcomer Stephen Campbell Moore), a well-connected but flat broke novelist and fringe member of this society who is railroaded into writing an anonymous gossip column about his pals -- although he's soon inventing entirely fictional members of the circle just to keep his readers amused.

An ironic failure at schemes to get rich quick so he can ask the "frantically bored" and beautiful but secretly vulnerable and melancholy Nina (subtly heartbreaking and simply wonderful Emily Mortimer) to marry him, Adam's fortunes -- which practically fluctuate with the tides -- are just one source of endless humor. But director Fry furtively hints at shades of compunction and misfortune under the film's carefree surface that bubble up as world events encroach on these lives of leisure, eventually taking the film to an unexpected level of empathy, nuance and humanity.

Continue reading: Bright Young Things Review

Peter O'toole

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Peter O'Toole

Date of birth

2nd August, 1932

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.82


Peter O'Toole Movies

Ratatouille Movie Review

Ratatouille Movie Review

A fine red wine only gets better with age. Long before that cork is popped...

Venus Movie Review

Venus Movie Review

Not since Harold and Maude has there been an intergenerational love connection as intense as...

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Troy Movie Review

Troy Movie Review

"War is young men dying and old men talking," bellows one Greek leader following a...

Lawrence of Arabia Movie Review

Lawrence of Arabia Movie Review

Being the self-proclaimed professional film critic that I am, I am somewhat embarrassed to admit...

Man of La Mancha Movie Review

Man of La Mancha Movie Review

The translation from theatrical musical to movie musical doesn't get much more disastrous than in...

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