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Richard Attenborough - Shown on the set, from left: Ben Kingsley (as Mahatma Gandhi), director Richard Attenborough - Thursday 28th March 2013

Richard Attenborough

Richard Attenborough - Richard Attenborough, ca. 1940s - Thursday 26th March 2009

Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough

Richard Attenborough - Richard Attenborough, c. 1946 - Tuesday 26th March 2013

Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough

Richard Attenborough - Shown from left: Richard Attenborough, Milo O'Shea, Lee Remick - Monday 25th August 2014

Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough

Richard Attenborough - Shown from left: Richard Attenborough, Judy Geeson - Tuesday 21st April 2009

Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough

Richard Attenborough - Shown from left: Richard Attenborough, Laura Dern, Sam Neill - Monday 25th March 2013

Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough

Richard Attenborough - Shown: Sheila Sim, Richard Attenborough - Friday 3rd August 2012

Richard Attenborough

Richard Attenborough - Shown from left: Eddie Constantine, Richard Attenborough - Thursday 14th July 2011

Richard Attenborough

Chaplin Review


Very Good
Movies about movie stars are always a dodgy affair. They reek of in-jokes, chumminess, and a glossy version of Hollywood that has never really existed.

As actors go, Charlie Chaplin is at least a worthy candidate for a biopic. His impact on the acting profession and especially physical comedy is hard to overstate, and the man remains an icon whose face (or silhouette) embodies cinema. In the hands of Richard Attenborough, Chaplin's life is digested into the highlights -- from vaudevillian youth to his arrival in Hollywood to his amazingly fast rise to fame. Attenborough even dabbles in Chaplin's investigation by J. Edgar Hoover's FBI. Naturally, the running series of Chaplin's famous romantic entanglements are carefully tallied, the actresses playing the various Mrs. Chaplins (and near misses) making up a who's who of early-'90s starlets.

Continue reading: Chaplin Review

Richard Attenborough - Lord Richard Attenborough London, England - at Waterstone's to sign copies of his autobiography 'Entirely Up To You, Darling,' released today. Written with Diana Hawkins, with whom he has worked for nearly 50 years, the title chronicles Attenborough's 60-year career. Thursday 4th September 2008

Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough

Richard Attenborough - Richard Attenborough and Guest Wednesday 9th April 2008 at Grosvenor House London, England

Richard Attenborough

Gandhi Review


Extraordinary
In a society rife with Robin Williams waterworks and Ben Affleck angst, it's nice to have an occasional jolt of truth. Gandhi, while a couple of decades old now, still has that bold-faced honesty which we find so often lacking in many contemporary films.

Gandhi stars Ben Kingsley in a retelling of the life and times of revered Indian leader Mohandas Gandhi, renowned peace lover, sage, and all around worldly wise man. There is little told here that cannot be read in any history book, for Gandhi is not some sort of Hollywood trumped up, Pearl Harbored dramatization of history. Rather, it's just the facts, nothing but truth.

Continue reading: Gandhi Review

The Flight Of The Phoenix (1965) Review


Excellent
This exciting and underseen film features James Stewart at the top of his late-career game, offering the far-fetched yet strangely compelling tale of a group of air crash survivors who, trapped in the Sahara Desert and with no other options in sight, decide to build a miniature plane out of the giant air hulk they crashed in. Sure, the odds of crashing your plane with a flotilla of tools, jet fuel, pressed dates, and a welding apparatus -- but without a working radio or much water -- isn't exactly believable, but somehow director Robert Aldrich (The Dirty Dozen) makes it work, and work well. Will this bizarre contraption really work? It's two and a half nail-biting hours during which personalities violently crash, schemes are hatched, and a career-making secret is revealed.

Continue reading: The Flight Of The Phoenix (1965) Review

Conduct Unbecoming Review


Good
The movie looks hideous: What, was this made for the BBC? The weird lighting and bad camera work (not to mention the music and even the credits) screams Movie of the Week. Good thing the story is far better than its technical pedigree, a case of military justice about a women, ostensibly raped by a soldier in British colonial India. A number of solid performances can be found in the courtroom (especially Michael York's earnest defense attorney), though the machinations of the case border on the absurd. The ending -- the sole part of the film that is visually moving -- almost makes it all worthwhile.

In Love And War Review


Weak
This period epic went virtually unseen and for good reason: It doesn't tell you much about love or war... or Ernest Hemingway, its ostensible subject. Chris O'Donnell playing rough-and-tumble Hemingway during his spell in World War I (which he spent in a hospital, falling for one of the nurses) is the bulk of the problem, but Richard Attenborough has never been one to tell a story succinctly, and In Love and War rambles interminably forever, going absolutely nowhere. The script, adapted from the nurse's diaries, actually feels like it was adapted from some nurse's diaries. I'll just read my wife's diary if I want that kind of a thrill.

Elizabeth Review


Good
Seeing Elizabeth on the day of the impeachment of President Clinton was a bit strange, but it did put things in perspective.

450 years ago, no one would've thought a thing about a little intern boinking. Today, that's obviously big news, and it should have made the sexual, political, and religious escapades of Elizabeth all the more thrilling.

Continue reading: Elizabeth Review

Séance On A Wet Afternoon Review


Good
Here's a good scam: Woman, trying to prove her ability as a psychic, kidnaps the child of a wealthy couple so she can use "her powers" to later find the child. She's not really in it for the money, alas. She's a raving lunatic.

Kim Stanley earned an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of a woman on the edge -- reminiscent of Angela Lansbury's turn in The Manchurian Candidate -- but it's Richard Attenborough who steals the show as her husband, who goes along with the affair but is torn between pleasing his wife and doing the right thing.

Continue reading: Séance On A Wet Afternoon Review

The Sand Pebbles Review


Good
A three hour epic about a U.S. patrol in 1926 China? Minghella and Bertolucci still make movies like this. Back in 1966 the auteur of the day was Robert Wise, who'd just come off of The Sound of Music. and this story of a ship headed upriver in revolution-torn China is as plodding as the engine on its gunboat. Much of the running time consists of engineer Steve McQueen working on the boat and trying to communicate with the local "slope heads," notably including a young Mako as a local co-worker. The last half of the movie has McQueen on the most protracted search and rescue mission imaginable. Wise has no handle on the out-of-control, yawn-inducing scenes, but McQueen helps to keep things generally interesting. Nominated for eight Oscars, The Sand Pebbles ultimately won none.

Jurassic Park Review


Good

When John Hammond, the rich billionaire who creates Jurassic Park, says he "spared no expense," we might as well be listening to Steven Spielberg, the film's prolific director. Jurassic Park cost somewhere in the vicinity of $63 million to make but that seems like nothing compared to the return, which was only a hair under $400 million. This is when we really knew what Spielberg could do: He could make a blockbuster better than anyone in the world. Jurassic Park isn't his best film by a long shot, but its mesmerizing entertainment and proof that the man is the go-to guy for action and adventure.

The beginning sets the pace perfectly: While transporting a cloned dinosaur into the titular theme park, a worker is pulled into its cage and ravaged while the other workers prod the beast to no avail. It's the following lawsuit that makes the park's owner, John Hammond (Richard Attenborough), want to bring in married paleontologists Alan and Ellie (Sam Neill and Laura Dern), theorist Ian (Jeff Goldblum), and his lawyer Mr. Gennaro (Martin Ferrero) to consult and give the park their seal of approval. When they first arrive, they are amazed by the dinosaurs and charmed by Hammond, his money and his technology. They are also charmed by his grandchildren, Tim and Lex (Joseph Mazzello and Ariana Richards), who come right before the security breaks down. Soon enough, the dinosaurs are loose, eating humans (and each other) with rampant glee.

The main attractions, obviously, are the dinosaurs and the wizards at Stan Winston Studios and Industrial Light and Magic, who did the special and visual effects for the film. For the raptors, specifically, they give the creatures such a fluid range of motion that the carnality of their attacks gives off a vibrant feeling. Spielberg has a knack for mixing visual fireworks with a solid storyline, but he still has trouble with his characters and making them deeper than mere sketches of people. It's easy: Hammond is the rich guy who learns his lesson, Alan is the logical, surprisingly adept hero, Ellie is his equal but understands more emotional things, Ian is the comic relief, Lex and Tim are the innocents, and the lawyer is a meal. But none of these characters really go beyond these archetypes, although the actors try their hardest to give the lines depth (special kudos to Dern and Neill). David Koepp, assisted by Michael Crichton, has crafted a great story in his screenplay, but he never gives enough care to the details of the characters.

It's been argued by a lot of people that Spielberg is a hack; that he treats his controversial films (Schindler's List, Amistad) with the same do-anything rush of his action/adventure films (Minority Report, the Indiana Jones trilogy). Maybe they have a point, but there is no arguing that Spielberg is an important director and a potent storyteller. Jurassic Park serves as an example of his control of story and imagery but also shows off his lack of character development, which has only really been cured in Jaws, indisputably his best film. His next film, Munich, was written by Tony Kushner, the famed author of Angels in America, which might make for a deeper drama from Spielberg. Either way, I guarantee that the producers spared no expense.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park Review

The Flight Of The Phoenix (1965) Review


Excellent
This exciting and underseen film features James Stewart at the top of his late-career game, offering the far-fetched yet strangely compelling tale of a group of air crash survivors who, trapped in the Sahara Desert and with no other options in sight, decide to build a miniature plane out of the giant air hulk they crashed in. Sure, the odds of crashing your plane with a flotilla of tools, jet fuel, pressed dates, and a welding apparatus -- but without a working radio or much water -- isn't exactly believable, but somehow director Robert Aldrich (The Dirty Dozen) makes it work, and work well. Will this bizarre contraption really work? It's two and a half nail-biting hours during which personalities violently crash, schemes are hatched, and a career-making secret is revealed.

Continue reading: The Flight Of The Phoenix (1965) Review

The Lost World: Jurassic Park Review


Good
Well, it ain't Schindler's List.

With his highly anticipated Jurassic Park sequel, Steven Spielberg grubs through the filmmaking archives for every plot device, camera trick, and clichéd scene you can think of, and rolls it into one big mess. Only with dinosaurs. Lots of 'em!

Continue reading: The Lost World: Jurassic Park Review

Doctor Dolittle (1967) Review


Very Good
As children's films go, Doctor Dolittle is a bit on the ridiculous side, clocking in at 2 1/2 hours long.

As one-joke movies go (veterinarian learns to talk to animals), Dolittle is... well, a bit on the ridiculous side, clocking in at 2 1/2 hours long.

Continue reading: Doctor Dolittle (1967) Review

Grey Owl Review


Weak
Pierce Brosnan stars in this period epic (and I do mean epic - this movie is looooong) about a British guy in the early 1900s who took on the persona of a native American beaver trapper named Grey Owl. The beginning of the film sports Grey Owl trapping beavers then coming to his senses for the environmental damage its causing, then Mr. Owl crusades around the world preaching "Not enough beaver." (I'll say.) By the end of the picture, Grey Owl is outed as being the Brit that he is, but no one seems to care. I only fell asleep twice.

The Magic Christian Review


Very Good
The video cover of The Magic Christian features Ringo Starr sitting on Peter Sellers' lap. Starr has on his usual shit-eating grin, and Sellers' expression can only be described as one of sheer horror.

Sellers may very well have had no idea what he was getting into with this movie, an adaptation of the cult novel by the same name from author Terry Southern. The film concerns Sellers' business magnate Guy Grand, who adopts a homeless man (Starr) and presents him to the board as his son.

Continue reading: The Magic Christian Review

Gandhi Review


Extraordinary
In a society rife with Robin Williams waterworks and Ben Affleck angst, it's nice to have an occasional jolt of truth. Gandhi, while a couple of decades old now, still has that bold-faced honesty which we find so often lacking in many contemporary films.

Gandhi stars Ben Kingsley in a retelling of the life and times of revered Indian leader Mohandas Gandhi, renowned peace lover, sage, and all around worldly wise man. There is little told here that cannot be read in any history book, for Gandhi is not some sort of Hollywood trumped up, Pearl Harbored dramatization of history. Rather, it's just the facts, nothing but truth.

Continue reading: Gandhi Review

Richard Attenborough

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Richard Attenborough

Date of birth

29th August, 1923

Date of death

24th August, 2014

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male


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Richard Attenborough Movies

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

When John Hammond of genetic engineering company InGen manages to clone dinosaurs from prehistoric DNA...

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Elizabeth Movie Review

Elizabeth Movie Review

Seeing Elizabeth on the day of the impeachment of President Clinton was a bit strange,...

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The Lost World: Jurassic Park Movie Review

The Lost World: Jurassic Park Movie Review

Well, it ain't Schindler's List.With his highly anticipated Jurassic Park sequel, Steven Spielberg grubs through...

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