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Stephen Fry and Elliot Spencer - EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA) Nominees Party at Kensington Palace - Arrivals at British Academy Film Awards - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 7th February 2015

Stephen Fry and Elliot Spencer
Stephen Fry and Elliot Spencer
Stephen Fry and Elliot Spencer

Elliot Spencer and Stephen Fry - Harvey Weinstein's Pre-BAFTA dinner at Little House, in partnership with Burberry & Grey Goose - London, United Kingdom - Friday 6th February 2015

Elliot Spencer and Stephen Fry
Elliot Spencer and Stephen Fry
Elliot Spencer and Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Stephen Fry EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA) rehearsal at the Royal Opera House. at British Academy Film Awards - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 5th February 2015

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Stephen Fry sighting at The BBC - London, United Kingdom - Monday 2nd February 2015

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Shots from the announcement of the nominations for the EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs) which was held in Piccadilly, London, United Kingdom - Friday 9th January 2015

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Sam Claflin and Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - People of the Year Awards 2014 at The Citywest Hotel - Outside Arrivals - Dublin, Ireland - Saturday 6th December 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Snaps of a host of celebrities as they arrived for the People of The Year Awards 2014 which were held at Citywest Hotel in Dublin, Ireland - Saturday 6th December 2014

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Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Shots from the World Premiere of 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' the final film in the trilogy as stars arrived at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, United Kingdom - Monday 1st December 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Shots from the World Premiere of 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' the final film in the trilogy as stars arrived at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, United Kingdom - Monday 1st December 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Celebrities at Chiltern Firehouse restaurant - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 30th September 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry Is In Martin Scorsese's New Movie, 'Tomorrow'


Stephen Fry Martin Scorsese

Stephen Fry and the singer-songwriter Joss Stone are among the cast for the Martin Scorsese produced Tomorrow, the directorial debut of Martha Pinson, his long-time script consultant. 

Stephen FryStephen Fry is among the cast for the Martin Scorsese produced 'Tommorowland'

The movie explores the difficulties that many soldiers in World War II had with reintegrating into society. Production began in London on Monday (September 22) and will continue in Wiltshire and Spain.

Continue reading: Stephen Fry Is In Martin Scorsese's New Movie, 'Tomorrow'

Stephen Fry - 'Salome' gala screening at South Bank - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 21st September 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Mark Shand's Memorial at St Pauls Church in Knightsbridge - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 11th September 2014

Stephen Fry - Celebrities at Chiltern Firehouse in Marylebone - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 20th July 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Celebrities outside Chiltern Firehouse in Marylebone - London, United Kingdom - Friday 11th July 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Monty Python Live held at The O2 - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 1st July 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Stephen Fry leaves the Chiltern Firehouse restaurant on a mobility scooter complete with 'I Love Dogging' sticker. The comedian wore a black t-shirt with 'I'm Still In Beta' before he sped down the street - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 25th June 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Celebrities at the Chiltern Firehouse restaurant in Marylebone - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 25th June 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry and Eddie Redmayne - Miss Saigon Press Night at the Prince Edward Theatre - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 21st May 2014

Stephen Fry and Eddie Redmayne
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Chelsea Flower Show VIP and Press Preview - London, United Kingdom - Monday 19th May 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Celebrities at the Chiltern Firehouse restaurant in Marylebone - London, United Kingdom - Monday 28th April 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - RTS Programme Awards 2014 held at Grosvenor House Hotel - Arrivals - London, England, United Kingdom - Tuesday 18th March 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - David Frost - memorial unveiling and service of remembrance held at Westminster Abbey - Departures. - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 13th March 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - David Frost - memorial unveiling and service of remembrance held at Westminster Abbey - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 13th March 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - Prince gig at Ronnie Scott's in Soho - Outside Arrivals and departures - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 18th February 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry - EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA) after-party held at the Grosvenor House - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 16th February 2014

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry

The 2014 BAFTAs Run Like The Oscars' Older, Funnier Sister


Stephen Fry Emma Thompson Chiwetel Ejiofor Steve McQueen Alfonso Cuaron Lupita Nyong'o Barkhad Abdi

As the British equivalent to the Oscars, last night’s BAFTAs were obviously a glamorous affair. In between bouts of Stephen Fry’s self deprecating humor (“[Oprah’s] performance in The Butler was so moving, I almost gave mine the afternoon off.”) and jabs at all of his colleagues (Fry introduced the flawless Emma Thompson as “In the film world, a goddess. In real life, a ghastly piece of sickly shrieking awful.”) there were also some awards given out.

Stephen Fry, The Hobbit Premiere
Stephen Fry always makes for an entertaining awards show.

The big winners of the night were somewhat surprising. Predictions pegged Gravity and 12 Years A Slave – the two award show favorites so far – for the majority of BAFTAs as well. Instead, the Steve McQueen directed 12 Years only took two awards out of 8 nods total. Granted, they were the big ones - best film and leading actor (Chiwetel Ejiofor) – but that was it.

Continue reading: The 2014 BAFTAs Run Like The Oscars' Older, Funnier Sister

'24: Live Another Day' Will Feature Stephen Fry As Prime Minister


Stephen Fry Kiefer Sutherland

The new season of 24 has been grabbing headlines on both sides of the Atlantic over the past month. London is at the center of this focus due to the film’s British setting.

Kiefer Sutherland
Keifer Sutherland On The Set Of '24' In London

And now – in more Anglo-centric news - Stephen Fry is to play the recurring role of Trevor Davies, British Prime Minister in the twelve-episode series.

Continue reading: '24: Live Another Day' Will Feature Stephen Fry As Prime Minister

Stephen Fry Joins '24' New Season, As British Prime Minister


Stephen Fry Kiefer Sutherland

24's new series will feature Stephen Fry as the British Prime Minister. Fry confirmed the news on Twitter, posting a link to the story on Deadline.com and writing, "Well, this particular cat is out of the bag." 

Stephen FryStephen Fry Will Play British Prime Minister in '24's New Season'

In 'Live Another Day' - set four years after the last series and once again starring Kiefer Sutherland - Fry will play the "strong and charismatic" leader of the country. Sutherland's counter-terrorist expert Jack Bauer returns to London as a fugitive on the run from the CIA. Our recent photographs show the U.S. star shooting action scenes in the capital's Aldgate.

Continue reading: Stephen Fry Joins '24' New Season, As British Prime Minister

Bravo Stephen Fry, May Your Open Letter Herald Change


Stephen Fry

If you haven’t read Stephen Fry’s eloquently written, emotionally charged open letter to the Prime Minister, M Rogge, Lord Coe and Members of the International Olympic Committee, then you can do that here. If you have, then you’ve probably shared it on Facebook or Twitter or some such.

Fry is making the most of the digital age - something he’s both obsessed with and delighted with – by writing an open letter, pleading to both the leaders of sport and politics in this country, the worlds of which are entwined, to help put an end to the violently homophobic regime currently operating in Russia under Vladimir Putin’s command.

Stephen FryFry's letter will reach millions through the power of social media

Continue reading: Bravo Stephen Fry, May Your Open Letter Herald Change

Stephen Fry Demands Russian Winter Olympics Ban Over Anti-Gay Laws In Letter To PM


Stephen Fry David Cameron

TV presenter and comedian Stephen Fry has spoken out against the Russian Federation's new harsh anti-Gay law that even forbids the discussion of homosexuality around young people under 18. In an open letter to UK Prime Minister David Cameron, the Olympic Committee (IOC) and Lord Sebastian Coe, Fry urges that Russia be banned from the 2014 Winter Olympics, disparaging the country's laws as "shaven headed thuggery and bigoted religion."

Stephen Fry
Fry Has Demonstrated His Disgust Over Russia's Gay Laws.

If the Winter Olympics in Russia went ahead, rule six of the code of the Olympic Movement would indeed be flouted, as Fry quotes in his letter: "[The IOC should] Act against any form of discrimination affecting the Olympic Movement."

Continue reading: Stephen Fry Demands Russian Winter Olympics Ban Over Anti-Gay Laws In Letter To PM

Body Of Eastenders Actor Paul Bhattacharjee Has Been Identified


Stephen Fry

The body of EastEnders actor Paul Bhattacharjee was found last week, after a two-day disappearance. He was found at Splash Point cliffs in Seaford, East Sussex. Yesterday (Wednesday, June 17th) the body was finally identified as belonging to the 53-year-old actor. His next of kin have been notified and the death isn’t being treated as suspicious. Bhattacharjee was last seen leaving the Royal Court Theatre in London’s Sloan Square on July 10th, according to the BBC.

Stephen Fry, RAA Auction
Stephen Fry was among those appealing for the actor's return.

Those who saw him last say the actor had appeared to be in good spirits on the night, even having texted his girlfriend before he went off the radar. The Met was contacted on Wednesday morning by Sussex Police who said a body matching his description had been found last week. A number of actors took to Twitter to urge people to be on the lookout during Bhattacharjee’s disappearance. After news of the Casino Royal actor’s death, many used social media to express their grief and give their condolences to his family. Musician and composer Nitin Sawhney tweeted: "The saddest day. My friend (cast as Tagore in my play) Paul Bhattacharjee was found dead yesterday."

Continue reading: Body Of Eastenders Actor Paul Bhattacharjee Has Been Identified

Paul Bhattacharjee's Death Confirmed Prompting Twitter Tributes


Stephen Fry Kim Cattrall Colin McCredie Brooke Kinsella

Paul Bhattacharjee, the actor best known for his role as Inzaman on EastEnders, has died. The 53-year-old actor went missing on Wednesday 10th July. A body found in East Sussex on 12th July has been confirmed as Bhattacharjee.

Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry at the NOW Exhibition, held at the Royal Academy of Arts, 2012.

His body was found near cliffs in Seaford, East Sussex on Friday 12th July. It wasn't until yesterday that the body was identified as that of the actor.

Continue reading: Paul Bhattacharjee's Death Confirmed Prompting Twitter Tributes

Where Is Paul Bhattacharjee? Actor's Disappearance Sparks Fears For Safety


Stephen Fry Daniel Gillies

Paul Bhattacharjee was in high spirits after he left rehearsals at London's Royal Court theatre at approximately 6.15pm on Wednesday 10th July. His girlfriend received a text from the James Bond actor at 9pm but he has not been seen since, with increasing fears for the 53 year-old's safety. As reported by The Guardian, police have described Bhattacharjee's disappearance as "totally out of character" and are appealing to the public for any information or witnesses.

A Royal Court spokesperson has said that "He left on Wednesday in good spirits but didn't make it to rehearsals the next day," which was unusual for the hard-working actor who has starred in Spooks, The Bill, Waking the Dead and Eastenders. He was in the midst of rehearsals for Talk Show - a black comedy - in which Bhattacharjee's character has now been recast with performances having commenced from 16th July.

Paul Bhattacharje Performing In Much Ado About Nothing With Meera Syal:

Continue reading: Where Is Paul Bhattacharjee? Actor's Disappearance Sparks Fears For Safety

Stephen Fry’s Attempted Suicide While Filming Gay Documentary


Stephen Fry

It speaks volumes for both The U.K and the man himself, that Stephen Fry is openly gay, suffers from bipolar disorder, and is still a national treasure. Part of the reason he is so highly thought of is his openness and honesty, especially regarding his life-long battle with depression.

"I would go as far as to tell you that I attempted it last year,” explained Fry as he opened up on the issue of suicide, “so I'm not always happy – this is the first time I've said this in public, but I might as well. I'm president of Mind, and the whole point in my role, as I see it, is not to be shy and to be forthcoming about the morbidity and genuine nature of the likelihood of death amongst people with certain mood disorders." It was revealed that the comedien, writer, director, poet and actor, among other things, attempted to commit suicide while filming a BBC documentary about being gay in different parts of the world. Thankfully, he was stopped. 

"Fortunately, the producer I was filming with at the time came into the hotel room and I was found in a sort of unconscious state and taken back to England and looked after," he said while in conversation with fellow comedian Richard Herring. The host of Q.I and general British favourite empowers many to be openly gay, and his work with Mind, who deal with mental illness in the U.K, will no doubt raise awareness across the country, considering his high profile.

Stephen Fry Opens Up On His Condition: ‘I Attempted Suicide Last Year’


Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry is often open about his bipolar condition; we know about his tumultuous upbringing and his troubled teenage years. As one of Britain’s most treasured broadcasters, his position as the President of Mind – a mental health charity – represents a dichotomy of sorts.

On the one hand, he must inform and entertain in his various roles for the BBC and beyond, but on the other, he must remain open and honest so that he may help others with afflictions akin to his. Thankfully, for those with mental health issues, he is a constant beacon of candidness, and his latest comments while chatting with fellow comedian Richard Herring are nothing less than brutally honest.

"I would go as far as to tell you that I attempted it last year, so I'm not always happy – this is the first time I've said this in public, but I might as well,” he explained to a live audience at the Leicester Square Theatre. “I'm president of Mind, and the whole point in my role, as I see it, is not to be shy and to be forthcoming about the morbidity and genuine nature of the likelihood of death amongst people with certain mood disorders."

Continue reading: Stephen Fry Opens Up On His Condition: ‘I Attempted Suicide Last Year’

Stephen Fry Was Saved By His Producer Following Drink And Drugs Suicide Attempt Last Year


Stephen Fry

National treasure and known bipolar-sufferer Stephen Fry apparently tried to take his life last year, with the everyman spiralling into a deep, seemingly inescapable depression whilst filming overseas. Downing a cocktail of vodka and pills whilst locked away in his hotel suite, it was only because of a intervention of one of his producers that the QI presenter was found and rescued.

Fry detailed his most recent attempt to take his life - having tried a various points in his life before, most famously during his 1995 breakdown when he fled to Belgium - during an on-stage interview with comic Richard Herring at the Leicester Square Theatre in London. He told the comic; "I am the victim of my own moods, more than most people are perhaps, in as much as I have a condition which requires me to take medication so that I don’t get either too hyper or too depressed to the point of suicide," going on to say, "It was a close run thing. I took a huge number of pills and a huge amount of vodka and the mixture of them made my body convulse so much that I broke four ribs, but I was still unconscious. And, fortunately, the producer I was filming with at the time came into the hotel room and I was found in a sort of unconscious state and taken back to England and looked after.”

The well-exposed television presenter, who has fronted exposés on the mental disorder in the past, also spoke of the anguish he feels during the filming of QI, despite the usually chirpy front he has on when the cameras are rolling. “There are times when I’m doing QI and I’m going, ‘ha ha, yeah, yeah’ and inside I’m going, ‘I want to f****** die. I want to f****** die.’”

Continue reading: Stephen Fry Was Saved By His Producer Following Drink And Drugs Suicide Attempt Last Year

Edinburgh Festival Goes Down Under Yet Again, This Time With Fergus Linehan


Stephen Fry Edinburgh Festival Fringe

Former director of the Sydney Festival, Fergus Linehan, has been appointed to take over the Edinburgh international festival, which will kick off this August in the historic city.

Until as recently as 2012, Linehan – a Irish native – was the head of contemporary music at the Sydney Opera House, and currently, he is the artistic director of Vivid LIVE, which this May, presents Kraftwerk performing their eight albums and Bobby Womack's Australian debut. Linehan said: "I am delighted and deeply honoured to have been appointed as the next director of the Edinburgh international festival. I look forward to safeguarding the founding principles of the festival in ways which are engaging and relevant to all. Successful festivals respond to both place and provenance to create a unique identity and this is particularly true of Edinburgh, the pre-eminent festival city."

Stephen FryStephen Fry made his name at The Edinburgh Fringe

Continue reading: Edinburgh Festival Goes Down Under Yet Again, This Time With Fergus Linehan

Sweeney Todd Sweeps The Board Whilst Stephen Fry Also Wins At Whatsonstage.com Awards


Michael Ball Stephen Fry

Sweeney Todd was the clear champ at the more prestigious than they sound Whatonstage.com Awards in London at the weekend, with the much-loved play taking five wins, including best musical revival, best actor (for Michael Ball), best actress (Imelda Staunton), best director and best lighting.

The awards are voted for by theatre goers, so although the more traditional ceremony critics might sniff their nose at them, they often mean a good deal more to the recipients, given that it’s the public vote that’s meant they’ve achieved the win. For instance take Stephen Fry, who won a best supporting actor award for his performance as Malvolio in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. “ I am simply astonished” he said, according to Sky. “Seventeen years ago, I left this country in disgrace having run out of a play and I thought I might never return to the stage again. But thanks to the Globe ... I have been back on stage in a wonderful play and had the privilege of playing with one of the best casts that has ever been assembled."

Fry’s comments came in relation to a bad review he got for a performance in the play Cell Mates, something that caused the star – who suffers from manic depression - to skip the country. Elsewhere, Will Young won a newcomer of the year award for his West End debut in Cabaret.

Continue reading: Sweeney Todd Sweeps The Board Whilst Stephen Fry Also Wins At Whatsonstage.com Awards

Kylie Minogue Returns To Television For The First Time Since Neighbours


Kylie Minogue Andy Warhol Stephen Fry

It's safe to say that, while television provided her with the platform she needed, Kylie Minogue is a popstar first and an actor second. But she'll be needed her skillset from the latter as she returns to TV in a black comedy drama on Sky Arts.

Hey Diddly Dee - about a group of actors putting on a play about Andy Warhol - will also star Homeland star David Harewood, and sees her in a rare television performance since she quit Neighbours to pursue an illustrious career in music. The show is by Stephen Fry and Sandi Toksvig's production company, Sprout, and written and directed by actor Marc Warren. She made a brief comeback in the Doctor Who Christmas special on BBC1 in 2007, and earned rave reviews for her most recent role in Leos Carax film, Holy Motors, last year. "I'd definitely love to do more acting. My heart cries out for it; it's such a deep longing," she told the Guardian in an interview at the time. "For years I've been waiting to get back into it and it just hasn't happened. Or, it has happened and it was so disastrous that I thought: 'Oh, it's just not for me.'"

Sky's head of drama, Anne Mensah, told journalists of the show: "I think there's a drama renaissance going on at the moment ... to add Sky to that mix, anything that Sky does makes the drama community in the UK just richer and more exciting."

A Return To Form, Stephen Fry On Stage As Malvolio In The West End.


Stephen Fry

17 years ago, in 1995, Stephen Fry fled the stage of Cell Mates, by Simon Gray. Citing stage fright initially, and later, attributing it to a bout of depression as part of his sufferance with bi-polar disorder, Fry has not returned to the stage until now. Appearing as Malvolio, the epicentre of the comic sub-plot of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, his role has drawn vast national attention, to almost universally positive reception. 

Twelfth Night is, fundamentally, a confused love story of repeated mistaken identity, with a further comic sub-plot about a group of servants trying to convince Malvolio that a beautiful woman has fallen in love with him, the result which makes him appear mad. Malvolio's character and his role in the canon of literature becomes ever more significant in a world that is largely both particularly pointed at mental illness, yet also decidedly with its back turned towards it. Likewise, Malvolio is made to seem mad and abandoned in that false-mad state by those who put him there in the first place. For Fry, who has spoken about his experiences with bi-polar disorder, this is undoubtedly a poignant issue for him. This is perhaps why the humour with which Fry plays Malvolio is described as 'surprisingly gentle' by the ArtsDesk and as 'suitably grave' and 'dignified' by The Guardian. 

The Independent's observations were most generous and astute: "It's hardly surprising that so much of the coverage has been focused on him - a disproportion that increased when it was decided that there would be no official reviewing of the production's short recent run at the Globe," they said. "The irony is that Fry's performance - intelligently pondered, generous to the other actors, and almost studiedly not a 'star turn' by a celebrity guest artiste - is exactly the opposite in tendency. It restores balance to a play in which Malvolio's scenes can hog the limelight."

Continue reading: A Return To Form, Stephen Fry On Stage As Malvolio In The West End.

Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows Trailer


In 1892, the Crown Prince of Austria is found dead; his death is ruled as suicide, according to Scotland Yard detective Inspector Lestrade. But Sherlock Holmes knows that this isn't true: all the evidence suggests that the Crown Prince was murdered, by one Professor Moriarty, whose genius is matched only by Holmes'.

Continue: Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows Trailer

Alice In Wonderland Trailer


Watch the trailer for Alice In Wonderland

Continue: Alice In Wonderland Trailer

Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story Review


Very Good
At one point during Michael Winterbottom's shambolically hilarious Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story, a film about trying to film the legendarily unfilmmable 18th century novel, Steve Coogan says to a reporter that the wonderful thing about Laurence Sterne's book (which he obviously hasn't read) is how ahead of its time it was, that it was "a postmodern novel... before there was a modernism... to be post of." It's a throwaway line in some respects, but it's an excellent example of the layered absurdist humor that abounds within its wonderfully loose format. This is a film about ego, the fatal inability of people to plan their lives, and the delirious chaos of the creative process. It's also about what utter jerks movie stars can be, God bless 'em.

Sterne's novel is a big old mess and has never been quite accepted in the literary canon. Published in nine installments over a decade, it's a subplot-mad, diversion-crazed bildungsroman where the narrator - Shandy - can't even get past describing his own birth by the end of the book, due to his tendency to go off on tangents. Along the way it packs in satires of contemporary intellectuals like Pope and Locke and plays with the novelistic form, including even having one page printed entirely black to represent sorrow at a character's death. They try that in the film, but then realize it's not quite so interesting for audience.

Continue reading: Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story Review

Whatever Happened To Harold Smith? Review


Very Good
This strange and compelling Brit-flick has two disparate tales that surprisingly intersect when the father (Harold Smith) of one boy manages to stop the pacemakers of three elderly audience members during his attempt at mentally stopping the watches in the crowd. Whoops. In his defense is a scientist he refutes such mental powers, and his daughter and the Smith boy turn out to be semi-secret lovers. Well-acted and full of droll humor, and worth a look if you can find it for rent or on cable. Unfortunately, it has perhaps the worst movie title I've ever heard (and it makes me not want to see it again, just thinking about that title!)... except, of course, for this movie.

V For Vendetta Review


Excellent
A handful of films released during the 2005 Oscar race raised important questions about the unchecked influence of government. Stephen Gaghan's Syriana probed the unholy marriage of business and politics in the Middle East. George Clooney's Best Picture nominee Good Night, and Good Luck examined the witch-hunting tactics of Senator Joseph McCarthy and the media's subsequent response.

For a while, Hollywood had returned to the conspiracy-theory vibe of the 1970s, when political dialect and public paranoia drove plot lines and inspired the creative minds of Francis Ford Coppola, Alan J. Pakula, and Sidney Lumet. I'm happy to report that the conversations prompted by Gaghan and Clooney are carrying over into 2006 with James McTeigue's V for Vendetta, an open rebellion against society's close-mindedness that's based on Alan Moore's incendiary graphic novel (though the irritable author has renounced any cinematic version of his work).

Continue reading: V For Vendetta Review

Cold Comfort Farm Review


Excellent
Clever and funny English country dramady about an orphan (Beckinsale, in a radiant debut that has gone downhill ever since), who is sent to live with her insane relatives on Cold Comfort Farm. Grows better with each viewing.

Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story Review


Very Good
At one point during Michael Winterbottom's shambolically hilarious Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story, a film about trying to film the legendarily unfilmmable 18th century novel, Steve Coogan says to a reporter that the wonderful thing about Laurence Sterne's book (which he obviously hasn't read) is how ahead of its time it was, that it was "a postmodern novel... before there was a modernism... to be post of." It's a throwaway line in some respects, but it's an excellent example of the layered absurdist humor that abounds within its wonderfully loose format. This is a film about ego, the fatal inability of people to plan their lives, and the delirious chaos of the creative process. It's also about what utter jerks movie stars can be, God bless 'em.

Sterne's novel is a big old mess and has never been quite accepted in the literary canon. Published in nine installments over a decade, it's a subplot-mad, diversion-crazed bildungsroman where the narrator - Shandy - can't even get past describing his own birth by the end of the book, due to his tendency to go off on tangents. Along the way it packs in satires of contemporary intellectuals like Pope and Locke and plays with the novelistic form, including even having one page printed entirely black to represent sorrow at a character's death. They try that in the film, but then realize it's not quite so interesting for audience.

Continue reading: Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story Review

Le Divorce Review


Good
Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in a multitude of ways. The blondes are the Walker sisters of California, Roxy (Naomi Watts) and Isabel (Kate Hudson). As Le Divorce opens, Isabel has just arrived in Paris to stay with Roxy and help her out in the late stages of her pregnancy. As luck would have it, Isabel shows up just as Roxy's husband, Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud) is walking out on her and their young daughter. The highly moralistic Roxy refuses to give Charles-Henri a divorce, instigating a battle with his extensive, wealthy family, which is lorded over with queenly arrogance by his mother, Suzanne de Persand (Leslie Caron).

The conflict between the Walker and de Persand clans is meant to be only the backdrop for the film's marquee star, Kate Hudson, to strut her naïve self around Paris and fall in lust with Charles-Henri's uncle, the much-older Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), a suave TV commentator. But it is this familial battleground that quickly becomes the more engaging storyline, especially after Roxy and Isabel's parents (Sam Waterston and Stockard Channing) fly in from California to help out in the negotiations. Waterston and Channing play their roles with effortless grace, establishing that they've been comfortably married for years by using only the slightest of gestures.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

Bright Young Things Review


OK
Bright Young Things arrives at an ideal time. Focusing on a group of twentysomething socialites having a frolicking good time in 1930s London, while the press hungers for every detail, it capitalizes on the current media's fascination with idiot VIPs like the Hilton sisters and Bijou Phillips. For some, Bright Young Things could also serve as a sunnier alternative to the gloomy young things in Garden State, Natalie Portman excluded.

It's OK to have fun in your twenties, and in Bright Young Things, the characters have plenty of it. They attend lavish costume parties that scream of good times and well-funded debauchery, do cocaine like Rick James in 1979 and take trips to the countryside, all the while exchanging quips. At its best, the movie resembles a far more literate, sophisticated version of an episode of the E! True Hollywood Story.

Continue reading: Bright Young Things Review

The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review


Very Good
Tolkein geeks have The Lord of the Rings. I have The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. One of my most beloved book series as a youth (I still carry a towel in my trunk thanks to its advice), I even sat through (and enjoyed) the cheesy BBC miniseries made from the novels. So just so you know what you're getting into with this review: I'm a self-confessed overgrown fanboy on this one.

Decades in the making, Guide has been embroiled in controversy since the very beginning. The most recent round of complaints have covered pretty much the entire film, from casting (Mos Def taking a role commonly envisioned as a sort of British dandy) to directing (Garth Jennings is a music video veteran), to choice of writer Karey Kirkpatrick (a kiddie flick screenwriter best known for Chicken Run but also the writer of disastrous flicks The Little Vampire and Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves). Out of this, we've all been promised, genius would spring.

Continue reading: The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review

Whatever Happened To Harold Smith? Review


Very Good
This strange and compelling Brit-flick has two disparate tales that surprisingly intersect when the father (Harold Smith) of one boy manages to stop the pacemakers of three elderly audience members during his attempt at mentally stopping the watches in the crowd. Whoops. In his defense is a scientist he refutes such mental powers, and his daughter and the Smith boy turn out to be semi-secret lovers. Well-acted and full of droll humor, and worth a look if you can find it for rent or on cable. Unfortunately, it has perhaps the worst movie title I've ever heard (and it makes me not want to see it again, just thinking about that title!)... except, of course, for this movie.

Gosford Park Review


Good
If Robert Altman had been given The Remains of the Day, the end product might have looked something like this.

Gosford Park is the name of an English country estate, where, in 1932, a gaggle of royals and wannabes -- including a horde of locals plus a popular British actor and a Charlie Chan-obsessed Hollywood movie producer -- gather to attend a weekend hunting party. Upstairs, it's the usual hoity-toity, drawing room chitter-chatter, while downstairs an army of servants does little but gossip about the visitors above.

Continue reading: Gosford Park Review

Gormenghast Review


Very Good
This BBC four-part miniseries adapts Mervyn Peake's epic fantasy novels for the small screen, with Jonathan Rhys-Meyers as the backstabbing upstart looking to gain control over the odd, timeless kingdom of Gormenghast, by any means necessary. Shot on a low budget, the series has enough cleverness, nifty effects, and curious characters to make its 6-hour running time worthwhile -- if only the BBC didn't play 4 minutes of commercials for every 10 minutes of movie. On DVD or VHS, you'll likely find Gormenghast a more palatable experience.

Continue reading: Gormenghast Review

The Life And Death Of Peter Sellers Review


Very Good
Discussion topic: Which of the following people can accurately be described as "comic geniuses"? Woody Allen. Adam Sandler. Groucho Marx. Gilda Radner.

You're unlikely to get consensus on such a phrase, except for one: Peter Sellers. Everybody knows he was a genius, right?

Continue reading: The Life And Death Of Peter Sellers Review

Wilde Review


Weak
You would think the life of Oscar Wilde would lend itself more to film. Not so. This biopic is unfathomably boring and ultimately pointless.

Gosford Park Review


Very Good

You may need a program to keep track of the two dozen-plus characters in Robert Altman's soap opera, murder mystery, chamber comedy-of-manners "Gosford Park."

Carpeted with dry wit and filled to the rafters with salacious secrets and unspoken animosity, the film takes place at an English country estate in 1932 and unfolds from two points of view -- above stairs, where a multitude of aristocrats size each other up in subtle sociological war games, and below stairs, where their gossipy maids and valets fall into a strict pecking order based upon whom they serve.

The estate is the home of the aloof upper-crusters Sir William and Lady Sylvia McCordle (Michael Gambon and Kristin Scott Thomas) and it's gathering place for their many coattail-riding relatives, including Aunt Constance (the wonderful, quizzically austere Maggie Smith) who habitually puts on airs as if she's not living off an allowance from the McCordles.

Continue reading: Gosford Park Review

Le Divorce Review


Bad

The further away director James Ivory and producer Ishmael Merchant get from their trademarked aristocratic period pieces, like "A Room With a View" and "Howard's End," the worse their movies get. At this point, I fully expect their next film to be a futuristic sci-fi chamber drama, because that's the only way they could sink lower than "Le Divorce."

A pseudo-sophisticated sexual roundelay full of trivial characters so selfish it's a chore to spend two hours with them, this is the story of two American sisters suffering the slings and arrows of French male infidelity -- but even these women served up as the movie's heroines are worthy of very little sympathy.

Naomi Watts plays Roxy, an insecure doormat of a pregnant poetess in present-day Paris, who is in shock at the departure of Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud), her philandering husband who has taken up with a married Russian dancer. Just arrived from Santa Monica, her supposedly self-possessed younger sibling Isabel (Kate Hudson) is appalled at Roxy's plight -- although that doesn't stop the little hypocrite from becoming the throwaway mistress of the cheater's Uncle Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), an arrogant right-wing politician.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

Stephen Fry

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Stephen Fry

Date of birth

24th August, 1957

Occupation

TV Presenter

Sex

Male

Height

1.96




Stephen Fry Movies

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Love & Friendship Movie Review

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Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass Trailer

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As Alice is once again taken into the magical and mysterious world that she's somehow...

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The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Trailer

Bilbo Baggins has narrowly escaped several deadly confrontations with the likes of trolls, stone giants...

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Bilbo Baggins, Gandalf and their company thirteen dwarves have managed to leave the Misty Mountains...

The Look of Love Movie Review

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Michael Winterbottom vividly recreates swinging 1960s London in this biopic about one of Soho's most...

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