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Tim McInnerny - London Time 100 event held at Aqua inside The Shard - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 8th October 2013

Tim Mcinnerny
Tim Mcinnerny

Grace Rowe, Annie Gosney and Tim McInnerny - Great Expectations Gala Party London United Kingdom Thursday 7th February 2013

Grace Rowe, Annie Gosney and Tim Mcinnerny
Jim Broadbent and Tim Mcinnerny
Amy Beth Hayes and Tim Mcinnerny
Jim Broadbent and Tim Mcinnerny
Amy Beth Hayes and Tim Mcinnerny
Annie Gosney and Tim Mcinnerny

Tim McInnerny - Tim McInnerny and guest Tuesday 18th September 2012 Press Launch for 'What You Will' at the Apollo Theatre

Tim Mcinnerny
Tim Mcinnerny
Tim Mcinnerny

Tim McInnerny and Empire Leicester Square Sunday 23rd October 2011 The BFI London Film Festival: W.E. - gala screening held at the Empire Leicester Square - Arrivals London, England

Tim Mcinnerny and Empire Leicester Square

Tim McInnerny and Empire Leicester Square Sunday 2nd October 2011 Johnny English Reborn - UK film premiere held at the Empire Leicester Square - Arrivals London, England

Tim McInnerny and Empire Leicester Square Sunday 2nd October 2011 Johnny English - UK film premiere held at the Empire Leicester Square - Arrivals. London, England

Tim McInnerny Thursday 16th June 2011 2011 Terrence Higgins Trust Gala dinner held at the Royal Courts of Justice London, England

Tim Mcinnerny

Tim McInnerny - Tim McInnerny, London, England - at the press and VIP evening, held at Duke of Yorks Theatre - Arrivals Wednesday 14th July 2010

Tim Mcinnerny
Tim Mcinnerny
Tim Mcinnerny
Tim Mcinnerny

Black Death Review


Very Good
This medieval thriller is cleverly shot and edited to crank up quite a bit of tension, even as the over-the-top grisliness and wacky religious overtones make it nothing much more than a cheap thrill.

Osmund (Redmayne) is a young monk in 1384 England just as the plague is breaking out. The question is whether it's a curse from God or caused by evil in the world. Then the Bishop's envoy Ulric (Bean) arrives with news that an isolated village is somehow pestilence free. Drafting Osmund as a guide, the team heads off to confront what is no doubt pure evil, and indeed when they arrive they meet the village leader Langiva (van Houten), who has turned her back on the Church and created a creepy idyll.

Continue reading: Black Death Review

Black Death Trailer


In 1348 the many people of England were struck down by the plague that swept the length and breadth of the island. Knight Ulrich was one of the greatest fighters of the time and when he learnt of a small village untouched by the deadly illness, he tasked himself, a band of soldiers and a young monk to discover their secret and hunt down a powerful sorcerer thought to be able to bring the dead back to life.

Continue: Black Death Trailer

Tim McInnerny and Laurence Olivier - Sunday 21st March 2010 at Grosvenor House London, England

Tim Mcinnerny and Laurence Olivier
Tim Mcinnerny and Laurence Olivier

Chris Smith and Tim McInnerny - Chris Smith and Tim McInnerny Thursday 27th August 2009 at Empire Leicester Square London, England

Chris Smith and Tim Mcinnerny
Chris Smith and Melissa George
Chris Smith and Melissa George
Chris Smith and Melissa George
Chris Smith and Melissa George
Chris Smith and Tim Mcinnerny

Severance Review


OK
The creators of Severance came up with a great pitch: it is, according to their press kit, The Office (presumably the U.K. version, as this is a British film) meets Deliverance. The problem is, I'm not sure if they came up with the pitch before or after they made the film; at its best, the resemblance is cosmetic.

In fact, the aspect of the British Office that Severance imitates most in its opening scenes is that show's occasional avoidance of actual satire in favor of invoking general malaise. We find members of the Palisades Defense sales team bussing their way to a team-building retreat; they're vaguely miserable, save for smarmy boss Richard (Tim McInnerny) and his suck-up assistant (Andy Nyman). But echoes of Brent and Gareth aside, this small group of sad-sacks looks like pretty much any other gang of Brit-com misfits: the slacker/stoner (Danny Dyer), the bumbling git (Nyman), the nerdy girl (Claudie Blakley), and the pompous guy (Toby Stephens). There's also a pretty American (Laura Harris) who all of the gents seem to fancy.

Continue reading: Severance Review

102 Dalmatians Review


Bad
It's always a bad sign when the core audience of a film -- children -- are either walking out early or are half-asleep when the credits roll at the end of a film. That about sums up the dreadful ugliness of 102 Dalmatians, a cold pea soup of cute animals, stupid Home Alone antics, a boring puppy love subplot between dumb humans, and Glenn Close reprising her best Joan Crawford impression. Indeed, Walt Disney is rolling over in his grave again, cursing John Hughes' name for making the original live-action 101 Dalmatians, one of the worst kiddie flicks of all time, and now its sequel.

The main culprit behind the hideousness of 102 Dalmatians is its predecessor, 101 Dalmatians. The original made more than $100 million dollars at the box office, spawned a torrid collection of "collectible" items that ended up months later in the discount bins of Wal-Marts across the country, and generally made every kid on the planet want a damn Dalmatian pup for Christmas. Well, it's been about four years since then, and Dalmatian fever is coming back, and this time it's digitally enhanced.

Continue reading: 102 Dalmatians Review

Wetherby Review


Good
Enticing setup: Man finagles his way into a dinner party thrown by strangers; no one knows who he is, but they're too polite to kick him out or even ask about his identity. He spends the night, and promptly shoots himself in the head the next morning in the presence of the hostess.

WTF?

Continue reading: Wetherby Review

The Emperor's New Clothes Review


Weak
There is nothing wrong with fictionalizing history in the pursuit of creativity. Even documentaries, which supposedly capture "the truth," are put together by someone with a specific purpose in mind, to steer the audience towards a new perspective. So it's okay that The Emperor's New Clothes isn't attempting to unearth some new evidence on a historically enigmatic figure, as it even admits to hypothesizing what could have been for the sake of a touchy-feely portrait.

Sir Ian Holm stars as both the outrageous Napoleon and Eugene the impostor, who is put in his place of exile on St. Helena. While the real Napoleon is rediscovering how to be with normal people in Paris, opposite the lovely, recently-widowed Pumpkin (Iben Hjejle, High Fidelity), Eugene is enjoying the newfound wealth of food and beverage. Though the acting of these two fine veterans is spotless, what they are given to do comes off wooden, as if they were over-directed to punctuate a particular word or facial expression.

Continue reading: The Emperor's New Clothes Review

The Emperor's New Clothes Review


Good

I'm a big fan of an emerging film genre I call the historical what-if story. "Shakespeare In Love" is the most well-known example of these yarns that skirt around the shadowy edges of known fact to create a fanciful fiction featuring a well-known figure. Others include the current, brilliant "The Cat's Meow," about a murder on William Randolph Hearst's yacht, and "Dick," a great 1999 comedy which presupposed that the Watergate scandal's Deep Throat was actually two ditzy teenage girls who overheard Richard Nixon's conspiracies while working as dog-walkers for the presidential pooch.

"The Emperor's New Clothes" takes a similar approach to the last days of Napoleon Bonaparte. As you may know, history proper records that after his defeat at Waterloo, the distinguished French general and pompous self-declared emperor died in exile under British guard in 1821. But this latest gem of this entertaining genre imagines the diminutive duce escaping back to Paris with grandiose plans to reclaim the throne, only to get waylaid into a more humble life as a middle-class fruit merchant.

Driven by a fantastic dual performance from Ian Holm as both Napoleon and the peasant look-alike who takes his place on the prison island of St. Helena, the film is funny, insightfully human and a delightful lark for history buffs without actually requiring much prerequisite knowledge.

Continue reading: The Emperor's New Clothes Review

Tim Mcinnerny

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Tim McInnerny Movies

The Hippopotamus Movie Review

The Hippopotamus Movie Review

This British satirical comedy may be a bit of a mess, but since it's based...

Eddie the Eagle Movie Review

Eddie the Eagle Movie Review

Based on the true story of an unapologetic underdog who never won anything, this British...

Race Trailer

Race Trailer

Race follows the life of athlete Jesse Owens and more specifically his athletic career as...

Eddie The Eagle Trailer

Eddie The Eagle Trailer

Even when Michael Edwards was a small boy, he had huge ambition. Whenever the Olympics...

Spooks: The Greater Good Trailer

Spooks: The Greater Good Trailer

Will Holloway is faced with not only the most critical event of his career as...

Spooks: The Greater Good - Teaser Trailer

Spooks: The Greater Good - Teaser Trailer

Dark times are coming to the United Kingdom. During a handover to MI5 Counter-terrorism leader...

Automata Trailer

Automata Trailer

Jacq Vaucan (Antonio Banderas) is working as an insurance agent for ROC Robotics Corporation in...

Johnny English Reborn Movie Review

Johnny English Reborn Movie Review

After the painfully unfunny 2003 original, a franchise was highly unlikely. And yet the spoof...

Black Death Movie Review

Black Death Movie Review

This medieval thriller is cleverly shot and edited to crank up quite a bit of...

Black Death Trailer

Black Death Trailer

In 1348 the many people of England were struck down by the plague that swept...

Severance Movie Review

Severance Movie Review

The creators of Severance came up with a great pitch: it is, according to their...

102 Dalmatians Movie Review

102 Dalmatians Movie Review

It's always a bad sign when the core audience of a film -- children --...

Notting Hill Movie Review

Notting Hill Movie Review

Julia Roberts is Julia Roberts - almost - in Notting Hill, a well-crafted romantic comedy...

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