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Tony Goldwyn - John Varvatos 13th Annual Stuart House Benefit at the John Varvatos Store - Arrivals at John Varvatos Store - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th April 2016

Tony Goldwyn

Tony Goldwyn - John Varvatos 13th Annual Stuart House Benefit Presented By Chrysler With Kids' Tent By Hasbro Studios at John Varvatos - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 18th April 2016

Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn

Tony Goldwyn - The Paley Center For Media's 33rd Annual PaleyFest Los Angeles presentation of 'Scandal' at the Dolby Theatre at Dolby Theater, Dolby Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 15th March 2016

Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn

Tony Goldwyn - Celebrities attend 33rd annual PaleyFest Los Angeles 'Scandal' at The Dolby Theater. at The Dolby Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 15th March 2016

Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn

Tony Goldwyn - 'Freeze Frame' U.S. Premiere at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 5th February 2016

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Tony Goldwyn and Liz Goldwyn

Liz Goldwyn , Tony Goldwyn - 'Freeze Frame' Gala and Architects of Change - Arrivals at The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Thursday 4th February 2016

Liz Goldwyn and Tony Goldwyn
Liz Goldwyn and Tony Goldwyn
Liz Goldwyn
Liz Goldwyn
Liz Goldwyn
Liz Goldwyn

Tony Goldwyn - Disney/ABC Winter TCA Tour held at the Langham Huntington Hotel - Arrivals at The Langham Huntington Hotel, Disney - Pasadena, California, United States - Saturday 9th January 2016

Tony Goldwyn

Tony Goldwyn - The 22nd Annual Elle Women in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 20th October 2015

Tony Goldwyn

Tony Goldwyn , Bellamy Young - ABC's TGIT premiere event - Arrivals - West Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 26th September 2015

Tony Goldwyn and Bellamy Young
Tony Goldwyn and Jane Musky
Tony Goldwyn and Jane Musky
Tony Goldwyn and Jane Musky
Tony Goldwyn and Jane Musky
Tony Goldwyn and Jane Musky

Tony Goldwyn - Audi celebrates Emmys Week 2015 held at Cecconi's restaurant in West Hollywood at Cecconi's - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 18th September 2015

Tony Goldwyn
Tony Goldwyn

Divergent - Teaser Trailer


Tris Prior is a 'divergent' in a world where everyone is split up in accordance to their dispositions. This means that she is no one of any faction of virtue, but a combination of all of them; something that makes her particularly powerful and unreceptive to the manipulative powers of the government. Given her position, she is warned not to reveal her circumstances to anyone, but to pick one faction and hope that nobody discovers her, otherwise she will be hunted down and killed. Determined to know just why divergents are such a threat to the world, she sets out to find out more about herself and her capabilities while becoming increasingly close with her faction initiation instructor, Four.

'Divergent' is a dystopian story about a futuristic society; a story rather in the vein of 'Ninteen-Eighty Four' and 'The Hunger Games'. It has been directed by Neil Burger ('The Illusionist', 'The Lucky Ones', 'Limitless'), written by Evan Daugherty ('Snow White and the Huntsman', 'Killing Season') and Vanessa Taylor ('Hope Springs', 'Jack & Bobby'), and is based on the 2011 novel of the same name by Veronica Roth; the first of a trilogy. It will hit cinemas in the UK on March 21st 2014.

Click here to read - Divergent Movie Review 

Conviction Review


Very Good
An extremely strong true story is told with emotion and skill, but never really rises above the level of a decent TV movie. This is perhaps due to unambitious writing, which never quite gives us an engaging point of view.

After a tough childhood in rural Massachusetts, Betty Anne Waters (Swank) has always been very close to her hot-headed brother Kenny (Rockwell). So when he's arrested for a vicious murder, she refuses to believe that he's guilty. After all of the appeals fail, she enrols in law school as a mature student and, with the help of fellow lawyer Abra (Driver) and evidence expert Barry (Gallagher), seeks to challenge Kenny's conviction with new DNA evidence. But this isn't nearly as simple as it sounds.

Continue reading: Conviction Review

The Mechanic Trailer


Some of the biggest criminals believe they're untouchable, it's Arthur Bishop's job to get to and kill anyone who's become a problem. Terrorists, cop killers and gang leaders are just some of the targets Arthur is assigned to take out quickly and efficiently.

Continue: The Mechanic Trailer

The Last House On The Left (2009) Review


OK
Nearly 40 years ago, quasi-hippy filmmakers Wes Craven and Sean S. Cunningham were looking to make a name for themselves (and a little cash, if possible) in the thriving New York exploitation scene. Working with some intent distributors, they adapted Igmar Bergman's Virgin Spring for the drive-in, and a grindhouse classic -- Last House on the Left -- was born. With its memorable marketing campaign ("repeat to yourself... it's only a movie... it's only a movie) and direct, documentary style, it had impact and import during a crucial time in post-modern American cinema. As with several of Craven's past projects, Last House has now been remade for the post-millennial crowd, and that's too bad. This tedious, tepid update offers none of the original's brutality or energy.

It's time for summer vacation and the Collingwood family -- doctor dad (Tony Goldwyn), teacher mom (Monica Potter), and daughter Mari (Sara Paxton) -- are heading to their isolated lake house for a little R&R. Sadly, the teenage girl will soon run into escaped killer Krug (Garrett Dillahunt), his son Justin (Spencer Treat Clark), the equally unhinged Francis (Aaron Paul), and gonzo gal pal Sadie (Riki Lindhome). Along with her buddy Paige (Martha MacIsaac), Mari will be tortured, abused, and left for dead. When the criminals show up at the Collingwood home looking for lodging, it's not long before the parents find out what happened... and when they do, the tables are turned and no one is safe.

Continue reading: The Last House On The Left (2009) Review

Joshua (2001) Review


Good
Movies produced with the support of religious or pseudo-religious groups typically employ one of two structures to get their message across: 1) Outsider comes to a sleepy town and wakes it up with his message of love and compassion or ability to perform miracles. Or 2) Armageddon arrives, the saved ascend to heaven, and the poor saps left on earth suffer through hell.

Fortunately Joshua is the former, and it's probably the most mainstream release to ever make it to theaters. With stars Tony Goldwyn, F. Murray Abraham, and Stacy Edwards, this is a classy production. Not only is the acting credible and the production values high (they even trek to Rome for the finale), but the story isn't all bad either. It's actually pretty simple: A man named Joshua (Tony Goldwyn) wanders into the sleepy town of Auburn one evening, rents a barn to live in, and promptly starts rebuilding the recently-burned-down Baptist church, unbidden by its parishioners. Meanwhile, the local Catholics take an interest in the cryptic man, employing him to carve a wooden statue.

Continue reading: Joshua (2001) Review

Ghost Review


Very Good
With a premise this stupid, it's hard to believe that Ghost became not just a mega-blockbuster but -- and you may have forgotten this -- the winner of two Oscars. Sure, most people remember Whoopi Goldberg's Best Supporting Actress win, but can you believe it also took home a Best Original Screeplay trophy? Ghost. You know, the one with Patrick Swayze loving up his wife from beyond the grave.

Watching Ghost again, 17 years after its release, it holds up surprisingly well. Or at least, it holds up as well as it did when it was originally released. There's a goodly amount of cheese on display here, but a surprising degree of restraint too. And that's down-right shocking: The director was Jerry Zucker, of Airplane! and Naked Gun fame. Ghost remains one of the few "serious" movies he's ever been involved with.

Continue reading: Ghost Review

The Sisters Review


Bad
Films have certain advantages over stage plays - locations can shift, laws of physics need not apply, and characters can do more than stand around and talk ad nauseam. Unfortunately, no one shared this world of possibilities with the makers of The Sisters, an aggressively frustrating and ultimately nonsensical waste of time and talent.The titular Prior sisters, hyper-literate and unlikable to a one, are conveniently categorized archetypes capable of little beyond petty bickering. There's the oldest, Olga (Mary Stuart Masterson), cold, repressed, and overly rational; the middle, Marcia (Maria Bello), whose vicious unhappiness has turned her into predatory shrew; and baby Irene (Erika Christensen), the idealistic peacemaker. The family, along with brother Andrew (Nivola), a spineless placeholder, and various relatives and hangers-on, assembles regularly for festive occasions as heartwarming as a pack of coyotes fighting over a kill.The melodrama is intimate but overly full of histrionics: Marcia is trapped in an awful marriage to an equally bilious psychologist and tempted into an affair - after approximately an hour of acquaintance - with a former student of her father's (Tony Goldwyn); two different professors (one acerbic, the other puppyish) are in love with the oblivious Irene; the entire family hates Andrew's trashy fiancée, Nancy. Each conflict plays out in vicious familial attacks and endless, self-congratulatory, falsely profound dialogue.The Sisters is based on the Chekov play Three Sisters, and I will title that Problem #1: It sticks too closely to the devices of the original. In Chekov's time, an unhappy marriage was permanent, love could be so socially unacceptable it was rendered unmentionable, and repression was a legitimate way of life. In a modern setting, the confines are simply not as limiting as the characters would like to believe. Marcia makes no secret of being violently miserable in her marriage and communicates with her husband solely in hurled vitriol, and yet she stays! For no good reason! This isn't a tragic character; she's a woe-is-me-martyr, and impossible to like for it.Problem #2 is in the adaptation of the piece from a stage play to the screen. I'd guess that, in the process, Richard Alfeiri was reluctant to make any significant alterations to his original or offer many concessions to the medium, because this reads exactly like a play. That isn't a complement; these characters do nothing but talk. In a stage setting, audiences are willing to put up with florid language, but for film, the dialogue is ridiculous. Characters pack every sentence with as many 50-cent-words possible - why say "live" when "inhabit" has so many more syllables? During one (of many) heated arguments, one sister actually says to another, "You do not understand my complexities enough to analyze and categorize me!" I wish I were making that up, or that it were an anomaly. But no, they are all so pleased with themselves, with their endless babble about the "nature of their truth" that every sentence furthers the desire to slap each and every character. Hard.Probably the biggest problem with The Sisters, however, is how great a waste it is. Despite the irritating script and visuals that are so sporadically fanciful that it looks as though Arthur Allan Seidelman is discovering the effects features on Final Cut Pro and wants to show them off, the cast is uniformly stellar. Bello's Marcia is deplorable, but she acts the hell out of her; same goes for Masterson and Elizabeth Banks as the uniformly reviled Nancy. All, really, are much better than the material given, so it is unclear what possessed such a rock-sold cast to sign on to such a screenplay, but at least their presence makes the film occasionally bearable.

The 6th Day Review


Good
You've seen the ads. You know the story. So is The 6th Day the same movie as Total Recall, just without the blonde? Not really, but don't feel bad if you have a little déjà vu along the way.

Rest assured, you're watching an Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle. This time he's not a spy or a commando, he's Adam Gibson, an extreme snowboarding tour guide in the not-so-distant future, an era that includes a company called RePet can clone your dog, cat, or snake. Or you can pick up a Sim-Pal, a child-size doll (with real hair that grows) that makes for one of the creepiest props I've seen since that miniature, squirting chicken in Eraserhead.

Continue reading: The 6th Day Review

Beyond The Ashes Review


OK
The 9/11 pity party is in full swing in Beyond the Ashes, yet another meditation on how New Yorkers can't seem to get their lives together after the terrorist bombings.

Liz (Janeane Garofalo, bafflingly present in a humorless film like this) refuses to leave her apartment, despite a lost cat and a crazy man (Giancarlo Esposito) who inexplicably woos her. Judy (a skeletal Nicole Hansen) gets picked up by a guy who may or may not be a cop, dumped in another apartment, and develops a strange relationship with a guy (Tony Spiridakis, the film's writer) who may or may not be a cab driver. A third story follows a bartender (Jennifer Carpenter) with a big secret and who may or may not be a lesbian, being wooed by a punk grrrl musician (Pauley Perrette).

Continue reading: Beyond The Ashes Review

Joshua Review


Good
Movies produced with the support of religious or pseudo-religious groups typically employ one of two structures to get their message across: 1) Outsider comes to a sleepy town and wakes it up with his message of love and compassion or ability to perform miracles. Or 2) Armageddon arrives, the saved ascend to heaven, and the poor saps left on earth suffer through hell.

Fortunately Joshua is the former, and it's probably the most mainstream release to ever make it to theaters. With stars Tony Goldwyn, F. Murray Abraham, and Stacy Edwards, this is a classy production. Not only is the acting credible and the production values high (they even trek to Rome for the finale), but the story isn't all bad either. It's actually pretty simple: A man named Joshua (Tony Goldwyn) wanders into the sleepy town of Auburn one evening, rents a barn to live in, and promptly starts rebuilding the recently-burned-down Baptist church, unbidden by its parishioners. Meanwhile, the local Catholics take an interest in the cryptic man, employing him to carve a wooden statue.

Continue reading: Joshua Review

The Last Tattoo Review


Good
You don't see many movies these days where a gonorrhea outbreak plays the central role. You can be thankful for that or not, but the oddball noir The Last Tattoo cuts a reasonably good movie despite a cryptic plot line. This New Zealand production is also set there, during a 1940s stopover by American troops. Kerry Fox plays the local medical examiner, who discovers an untreatable strain of the clap on the loose... and stumbles onto a murder and cover-up scandal along the way. Curious, though not totally compelling.

Friday The 13th Part VI: Jason Lives Review


Good
Dumbass Tommy digs up Jason's corpse and stupidly allows a lightning strike to reanimate him. He even drops off Jason's hockey mask for him. Sixth in the Friday the 13th series, the film returns to the roots of the series and largely ignores the pathetic part 5. Jason Lives is widely heralded as the very best film in the series, and I won't argue with that assessment. The gore is standard, but the sense of humor and consistently good running gags push this one to the top of the bloody heap.

An American Rhapsody Review


Good
An American Rhapsody offers us an example of teen acting gone marvelously right. As a 15-year-old who wants to rediscover her Hungarian roots, Scarlett Johansson portrays the thrill and frustration of being a teenager so perfectly that I don't ever want her to grow up. And her voice, with its cracked rage, only makes her desire to get control in her life sound more convincing.

When Johansson (Ghost World) is on screen, An American Rhapsody has a riveting passion and dramatic urgency that is found nowhere else in the movie, which is based on director/screenwriter Éva Gárdos's life. Johansson's character, Suzanne, is left behind in Hungary as an infant when her family stealthily moves to America circa 1950. Six years later, the young Suzanne is finally brought to America, where she joins her parents, Margit and Peter (Nastassja Kinski and Tony Goldwyn) and her older sister (Mae Whitman). However, in the process, Suzanne is torn away from the parents (Zsuzsa Czinkóczi and Balázs Galkó) of a family friend who nurtured and protected her from government suspicion.

Continue reading: An American Rhapsody Review

The Last Samurai Review


OK
Towards the end of Ed Zwick's The Last Samurai, Nathan Algren (Tom Cruise) washes away the memories of his brutal past and clears his path to honor and redemption with these words: "A man does what he can until his destiny is revealed."

No dice. For nearly three hours I did what I could to try to care about where this self-important vanity project was going, and concluded that it is Tom Cruise's destiny to never win an Academy Award.

Continue reading: The Last Samurai Review

A Walk On The Moon Review


Weak
Six producers for this? Let me just say that there's nothing more stomach-turning than the idea of Viggo Mortensen getting naked for the camera, but boy does his ass play a huge role in this movie. Diane Lane, as a repressed suburbanite summering in the Catskills on the eve of the 1969 moon landing, gets naked plenty, too. But the moon landing is a horrible poor metaphor for infidelity and the hackneyed "sexual awakenings" themes laid out here. For die-hard fans only.

Bounce Review


Bad
Great. Here I am, writing a review of yet another cheesy, clichéd, Ben Affleck romantic comedy in which I will probably be flamed by Affleck fans, Paltrow fans, romantics, teens, and widows. Yeah... widows. Why? Because Bounce is the latest in a string of contrived romantic comedies to feature a man falling for a widow whom he helped to make a widow.

Yeah... it's our old friends Bob and Harvey Weinstein, and this time they're capitalizing on plane crashes, public relations companies, alcoholics, and stalkers all in the same wicked stroke. Here we have Buddy Amaral (Affleck), just a good-old sweet talking ad rep who happens to give a free first class plane ticket to a guy named Greg (Tony Goldwyn) in order to sleep with Mimi (Natasha Henstridge... really, who wouldn't go for that)? Of course, the plane crashes, and, wouldn't you know it, he happens to rep the airlines. So he does what any person would: He drinks.

Continue reading: Bounce Review

Trouble On The Corner Review


Weak
Amateurish (and awfully titled) thriller has Tony Goldwyn romping about an urban apartment building, practicing as the local psychiatrist now and then, offing his patients when the mood strikes. Has some bright spots, but overwhelmingly the movie is slow and plodding and just plain badly made. Really not worth the trouble.

The Substance Of Fire Review


Good
"The substance of fire," apparently, is the printed word, in this play-adapted work about a man who is slowly ripping apart his publishing house, and his family to boot. Ron Rifkin appears in a rare -- perhaps unprecedented -- starring role, while Tony Goldwyn, Timothy Hutton, and Sarah Jessica Parker play the kiddies. Be warned this one's largely a melancholy exercise for drama students, but some nice performances help cut through the gooey histrionics to make the film somewhat worthwhile.

Abandon Review


Weak

There's a little more to "Abandon" than the stock woman-in-peril thriller it looks like. But since writer-director Stephen Gaghan stages the film like a stock woman-in-peril thriller, there's no way to know this until the last 10 minutes when the twists kick in.

The first 9/10ths of the picture consists largely of cutie coed Katie Holmes having her thesis-oriented last semester of college turned into a distractingly stressful ordeal by a cop (Benjamin Bratt) coming around to dredge up the two-year-old case of her missing boyfriend (Charlie Hunnam). Well, that and the fact that soon thereafter the boyfriend -- an arrogant, idle-rich kid with a silly shaggy hairdo and a penchant for brash theatrics -- reappears and begins stalking her from the shadows.

With only a few obscure, barely crumb-like hints that there might be something more going on than just unwelcome visits from a nefarious ex, the movie coasts along on perfunctory tension and Holmes' good looks for several reels while waiting for the other shoe to drop.

Continue reading: Abandon Review

Bounce Review


Weak

In "Bounce," Ben Affleck goes searching for the widow of the dead guy who got his seat on a doomed airliner. He plans to apologize but falls in love with her instead.

He doesn't tell her their meeting was no coincidence, despite several clear opportunities, and he shows no credible guilt over it. One night, the widow (a very moving Gwyneth Paltrow) bears her soul about her grief, and still he holds his tongue. Another night he sleeps with her instead of telling her the truth. He buddies up to her two young sons as a way to avoid telling her on other occasions. And when he finally does fess up, it's too late -- she's already found out from somebody else.

Yet we're supposed to like this selfish jackass because he's a recovering alcoholic and a glib stud learning What's Really Important In Life. We're supposed to feel bad for Ben and his broken heart. We're supposed to root for Ben and Gwynnie to get back together because his eyes get a little moist after she gives him his walking papers.

Continue reading: Bounce Review

Tony Goldwyn

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Tony Goldwyn Movies

Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House Trailer

Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House Trailer

The Watergate scandal is one of the biggest political incidents of the 20th century, which...

The Belko Experiment Movie Review

The Belko Experiment Movie Review

The kill-or-die scenario that this movie hinges on isn't something new; it's been used in...

Divergent Movie Review

Divergent Movie Review

Teens tackle yet another dystopian future in this well-made but derivative franchise-launcher. Filmmaker Neil Burger...

Divergent Trailer

Divergent Trailer

Author Veronica Roth and the cast of her book's film adaptation 'Divergent' talk about the...

Divergent Trailer

Divergent Trailer

Tris Prior is a 'divergent' in a world where everyone is split up in accordance...

The Mechanic Movie Review

The Mechanic Movie Review

Remade from Michael Winner's 1972 thriller, this action movie can't be bothered to get as...

Conviction Movie Review

Conviction Movie Review

An extremely strong true story is told with emotion and skill, but never really rises...

The Mechanic Trailer

The Mechanic Trailer

Some of the biggest criminals believe they're untouchable, it's Arthur Bishop's job to get to...

The Last House on the Left (2009) Movie Review

The Last House on the Left (2009) Movie Review

Nearly 40 years ago, quasi-hippy filmmakers Wes Craven and Sean S. Cunningham were looking to...

Joshua (2001) Movie Review

Joshua (2001) Movie Review

Movies produced with the support of religious or pseudo-religious groups typically employ one of two...

The 6th Day Movie Review

The 6th Day Movie Review

You've seen the ads. You know the story. So is The 6th Day...

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