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Udo Kier - 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - 'Nobody Wants the Night' - Red Carpet Arrivals at Berlinalepalast - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 5th February 2015

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Udo Kier - Shots of a host of stars as they attended Variety's Creative Impact Awards and 10 Directors to Watch brunch which was presented by Mercedes Benz and was held at Parker resort in Palm Springs, California, United States - Sunday 4th January 2015

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Udo Kier - A host of Hollywood's biggest stars were photographed as they arrived at the Palm Springs Film Festival Gala 2015 which was held at the Palm Springs Convention Center in California, United States - Sunday 4th January 2015

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Udo Kier

Udo Kier - A host of Hollywood's biggest stars were photographed as they arrived at the Palm Springs Film Festival Gala 2015 which was held at the Palm Springs Convention Center in California, United States - Saturday 3rd January 2015

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Udo Kier
Udo Kier

Diana Iljine and Udo Kier - Celebrities attending the opening night of the Munich Film Festival at Mathaeser Filmpalast - Munich, Germany - Friday 27th June 2014

Diana Iljine and Udo Kier
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Udo Kier
Diana Iljine and Udo Kier
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Udo Kier

Udo Kier - Variety's Creative Impact Awards And 10 Directors to Watch Brunch, at the Parker Palm Springs as part of the Palm Springs International Film Festival - Palm Springs, California, United States - Sunday 5th January 2014

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Udo Kier
Udo Kier
Udo Kier
Udo Kier
Udo Kier

Udo Kier and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala Los Angeles, CA, United States 24th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala in Palm Springs, CA Saturday 5th January 2013

Udo Kier and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala
Udo Kier and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala
Udo Kier and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala

Iron Sky Review


Weak
What starts out as a quite promising gonzo pastiche sadly loses steam after the first act, when the script runs out of ways to sustain the hilariously insane premise. It's a real shame, because the film is made to a surprisingly high standard.

On a moon mission to promote the 2018 re-election campaign of the US President (Paul), Astronaut Washington (Kirby) is captured by a colony of Nazis been hiding on the dark side since 1945. Within their massive swastika-shaped complex, they're preparing to take over earth with their Fuhrer (Kier). Things get complicated when second-in-command Klaus (Otto) travels to earth with Washington to get supplies for the invasion. But Klaus' idealistic schoolteacher fiancee Renate (Dietze) stows away for the trip, and their mission is derailed when they team up with the president's shark-like press agent (Sergeant).

Continue reading: Iron Sky Review

Udo Kier Sunday 6th November 2011 AFI Fest 2011 Premiere of Melancholia held at The Egyptian Theatre Hollywood, California

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Melancholia Review


Excellent
Von Trier continues to challenge audiences with his bold, bleak storytelling.

As always, he creates a stunning visual film experience full of raw, wrenching performances. And he tackles themes that are so big that we're not quite sure what to make of it in the end.

Justine (Dunst) is feeling a bit detached on the day of her wedding to the doting Michael (Alexander Skarsgard), and her brother-in-law John (Sutherland) is annoyed that she's not enjoying the expensive party he's staging. Her sister Claire (Gainsbourg) is more understanding, even when events take a few strange turns. Later, the shattered Justine will become the voice of reason when the planet Melancholia, which has been hiding behind the sun, heads towards Earth in a dramatic fly-by. Now it's Claire who's overwhelmed with moodiness, fearing for her young son (Spurr).

Continue reading: Melancholia Review

My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done Review


Extraordinary
There's no way that combining the geniuses of producer David Lynch and director Werner Herzog could result in something that wasn't utterly bonkers. But this film, based on true events, also has a startlingly emotional kick.

In San Diego, two detectives (Dafoe and Pena) converge on a suburban stand-off where a killer, Brad (Shannon), claims to be holding hostages. As the tension builds, Brad's girlfriend Ingrid (Sevigny) and his theatre-director friend Lee (Kier) arrive to help the cops, explaining Brad's somewhat strained relationship with his mother (Zabriskie) and his eccentric Uncle Ted (Dourif).

They also talk about how he has never quite been himself after a mind-opening trip to Peru.

Continue reading: My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done Review

Udo Kier, Natalia Avelon, Til Schweiger and Ralf Moeller - Udo Kier, Natalia Avelon, Til Schweiger, Ralf Moeller Berlin, Germany - Photocall for the movie Far Cry based on the eponymous video game at Hotel de Rome Wednesday 24th September 2008

Udo Kier, Natalia Avelon, Til Schweiger and Ralf Moeller
Udo Kier, Natalia Avelon, Til Schweiger and Ralf Moeller
Udo Kier and Natalia Avelon
Udo Kier
Udo Kier, Natalia Avelon, Til Schweiger and Ralf Moeller

Udo Kier and Nicolette Krebitz - Udo Kier and Nicolette Krebitz Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2009 Berlin, Germany - Hugo by Hugo Boss Fashion Show at Westhafen Thursday 17th July 2008

Udo Kier and Nicolette Krebitz

The Kingdom (1994) Review


Excellent
This is what would happen if you let David Lynch loose on the set of ER with nothing but a TV camera, a gaggle of Danish actors, and a bone saw. The Kingdom, an extremely ambitious effort for both the filmmakers and the audience, is Denmark's hipper-than-thou answer to Twin Peaks.

I'm not even going to attempt to explain the plot of The Kingdom, as it could fill several pages and still not make a lick of sense. I'll leave it at this: "The Kingdom" is a giant Copenhagen hospital, and every single room in it (and most of the corridors, and the driveway, and the parking lot) contains at least one complete wacko.

Continue reading: The Kingdom (1994) Review

The Kingdom II Review


Excellent
5 more hours and 4 more episodes of The Kingdom... I love it! And it keeps getting better. Check out our review of the first 4 episodes of this Danish TV event that makes stateside television look pathetic, uninspired, and just plain stupid in comparison. Can't wait for (what I believe to be) the last 4 episodes.

In Danish and Swedish with subtitles.

Continue reading: The Kingdom II Review

Bloodrayne Review


Terrible
German director Uwe Boll is making a name for himself as a schlockster, methodically working his way through a long list of video game adaptations for the silver screen, to painfully bad effect. Now, hot on the heels of the almost-straight-to-video Alone in the Dark with Christian Slater and Tara Reid, Boll is hitting us again with a film adaptation of the hot vampire title BloodRayne. And this is just a brief stop on the road to upcoming productions of Dungeon Siege, Far Cry, and Hunter: The Reckoning. Sadly, Boll is rushing so quickly through each of these absurdly bad pictures that he isn't taking the time to put the schlock where it belongs, so even fans of bad cinema are going to be pretty disappointed.

BloodRayne is the story of a red-headed half-vampire vixen (Kristanna Loken), a dhampir, on a mission to take revenge against her vampire father (inexplicably portrayed here by a wooden and probably somewhat disoriented Ben Kingsley) and the kingdom of night stalkers over which he rules. There are some motivations behind all this, and from time to time Kingsley and Loken utter lines apparently intended to illustrate these motivations, but mostly it doesn't make sense at all and it doesn't really matter. What does matter is that Rayne comes equipped with a pair of awkward-looking sword-type things and she knows how to use them. Well, she doesn't really, but a series of quick edits make that a moot point.

Continue reading: Bloodrayne Review

Blood For Dracula Review


Bad
Those requiring proof that Criterion is capable of releasing sub-par movies from time to time need look no further than Blood for Dracula, a Andy Warhol co-production that ranks among one of the worst and least faithful Dracula intepretations ever made. Udo Kier is Dracula, played as a villain so frail he vomits blood ever 10 minutes. He needs virgin blood, but all the lasses he encounters are strangely, um, experienced. Cute premise, but it's played straight, with nary an (intentional) laugh.

The Kingdom Review


Excellent
This is what would happen if you let David Lynch loose on the set of ER with nothing but a TV camera, a gaggle of Danish actors, and a bone saw. The Kingdom, an extremely ambitious effort for both the filmmakers and the audience, is Denmark's hipper-than-thou answer to Twin Peaks.

I'm not even going to attempt to explain the plot of The Kingdom, as it could fill several pages and still not make a lick of sense. I'll leave it at this: "The Kingdom" is a giant Copenhagen hospital, and every single room in it (and most of the corridors, and the driveway, and the parking lot) contains at least one complete wacko.

Continue reading: The Kingdom Review

Spy Games Review


OK
Serious-funny-romantic? Irène Jacob as a Russian spy? Well, Spy Games is a rough production, which probably explains why you've never heard of this film. Jacob and Bill Pullman are on opposite sides of the post-Cold War spy game... all while trying to get it on. It's very silly and improbable, but the leads -- and the inimitable Bruno Kirby -- are hard not to like.

Continue reading: Spy Games Review

Medea Review


Weak
Weird, to say the least, Lars von Trier's 75-minute Medea is a retelling of the tragic myth of Jason (of the Argonauts fame) and his sorceress girlfriend Medea. The cryptic tale is an exercise in long takes and roundabout dialogue, where every character speaks in riddles. Don't expect to learn much about Greek mythology, though some of the imagery in the film is quite haunting.

Epidemic Review


OK
In this film, two contemporary, young Danish men (played by Epidemic's screenwriter Niels Vørsel and writer/director Lars von Trier) set out, under pressure from their prospective producers and under a killing deadline, to write a screenplay about the title ailment, a mysterious and highly contagious illness characterized chiefly by the horrible, bloody demise it brings about within days. In that film, which we're treated to in doses, an idealistic young doctor named Mesmer sets out from the unnamed, sometime-in-the-20th-century, and still uninfected City for the outlying Infected Areas to provide treatment for those already afflicted. Fate plays an awful trick on our filmmakers, though: as work progresses on their film, an actual epidemic sweeps Europe, one strangely like that about which they're writing.

You know from the start that all will not turn out well; among the first scenes is a tour of the filmmakers' apartment in which the furniture is upended and the walls are smeared with blood. 1988's Epidemic chronicles the fateful few days in which the apartment's inhabitants simultaneously complete their film treatment and succumb to this plague.

Continue reading: Epidemic Review

Shadow Of The Vampire Review


Excellent
In this age of digital filmmaking, Shadow of the Vampire is a love letter to the beautiful mechanism of a motion picture camera. There's something both tactile and mysterious about images created on a thin sliver of film guided through a series of loops and pins. The final product is run through another instrument with wheels and sprockets, the projector. As the movie flickers across a silver screen, it's not too much of a stretch imagining the director whispering, "I gave you life."

That's the implied joke throughout Shadow of the Vampire, the strange and fanciful projection of what might have occurred during production of that classic 1922 German horror film, Nosferatu - A Symphony of Terror.

Continue reading: Shadow Of The Vampire Review

All The Queen's Men Review


Bad
Matt LeBlanc -- now here's a guy that picks winners to star in. He played second fiddle to a baseball-playing monkey in Ed. The same monkey could have owned his role in the pitiful Lost in Space. He even ironically played a B-movie actor in Charlie's Angels. And with his new turn in All The Queen's Men, LeBlanc finally embraces the monkey persona fully, complete with pantyhose, bad makeup, and ever so pouty red lips.

In his latest attempt to shake his identity as the dim-witted Joey from the TV show Friends, LeBlanc stretches his acting chops as a bad-ass solider boy sent to outwit the Germans during WWII, in order steal their spy secrets. It's a WWII comedy/drama/action yarn with an identity crisis that rivals that of Jame Gumb from The Silence of the Lambs.

Continue reading: All The Queen's Men Review

The Kingdom II Review


Excellent
5 more hours and 4 more episodes of The Kingdom... I love it! And it keeps getting better. Check out our review of the first 4 episodes of this Danish TV event that makes stateside television look pathetic, uninspired, and just plain stupid in comparison. Can't wait for (what I believe to be) the last 4 episodes.

In Danish and Swedish with subtitles.

Continue reading: The Kingdom II Review

Johnny Mnemonic Review


OK
In 2021, when the world is basically ruled by corporate Japan, humans with microchip brain implants are used to transport the most important of data files. Computer networks are unsafe, because people can "jack in" and neo-physically enter the complex world of cyberspace, where a computer virus won't just knock out your computer, it'll kill you outright.

This is the world of writer William Gibson, and it seems like a pretty interesting place to visit. It's unfortunate that Johnny Mnemonic does very little in this setting and comes off as little more than a remake of Tron, without the lightcycle sequence.

Continue reading: Johnny Mnemonic Review

Flesh For Frankenstein Review


Good
Camp is an understatement. This film, a partial product of the Andy Warhol art machine, reinvents the Frankenstein story as a sexed-up tale of incest, dismemberment, and 3-D gore, all ending in a slaughter on par with Hamlet... if it was written by John Waters. Horror fans will love it, as will friends of bizarro cinema. The rest of you are well-advised to steer clear.

Shadow Of The Vampire Review


Good

Part homage to one of cinema's best-known silent films, part winkingly nebulous black comedy, and part old-school horror flick, "Shadow of the Vampire" is a crafty "what if" fictionalization of the making of "Nosferatu," the world's first vampire movie.

The film stars John Malkovich as F.W. Murnau, the classic picture's legendarily obsessive director who is willing to go to any lengths to capture genuine terror from his cast -- even if it means hiring a real vampire to play the lead, promising the undead "actor" the neck of his leading lady when the picture wraps.

Enter Willem Dafoe in a performance of a lifetime as Max Schreck -- the method actor who never appeared to the cast and crew out of character (or out of make-up, or during daylight) the whole time "Nosferatu" was being made on location at a foreboding castle in Bavaria, circa 1922.

Continue reading: Shadow Of The Vampire Review

Dogville Review


Weak

Lars von Trier's peculiar compulsion to humiliate his heroines (and by extension the actresses who play them) has finally crescendoed to a deafening din of indiscriminate, exasperating martyrdom in "Dogville," a daring experiment in heightened performance and minimalist filmmaking that is fatally undermined by the Danish writer-director's conceit as a narrator.

His last four movies ("Breaking the Waves," "The Idiots," "Dancer in the Dark" and now "Dogville") have all dealt largely with the psychological (and sometimes physical) torture of vulnerable female protagonists. While his storytelling and cinematic style are almost always compelling, he's never seemed so arbitrary in his sadism than in this allegory of a beautiful, 1930s flapper fugitive hiding from the mob in a ragged, remote, austere Colorado mountain hamlet, where the tiny populace goes from distrustful to accepting to maliciously cruel on little more than von Trier's say-so.

Played with discernible dedication by Nicole Kidman, Grace is a porcelain enigma of self-flagellation so determined to escape some kind of shadowy past that, in exchange for the skeptical township's shelter, she agrees to indentured servitude -- doing handy work, favors and manual labor one hour a day in each of the seven households. She gradually comes earn the friendship of all -- even those most reluctant to accept her.

Continue reading: Dogville Review

All The Queen's Men Review


Terrible

Husky men in drag may be good for a sketch-comedy guffaw, but as the basis for an entire movie the idea always gets stretched way too thin.

It's the difference between "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert," a good movie with authentic transvestites who happen to be fun and funny, and "To Wong Fu, Thanks For Everything, Julie Newmar," an inane movie built on nothing more than the incongruity of seeing Patrick Swayze, Wesley Snipes and John Leguizamo in flamboyant frocks. (OK, Leguizamo looked pretty damn good.)

But far worse than even "To Wong Fu" is "All the Queen's Men," in which decking out burly boys as "broads" is little more than a fatuous gimmick -- the kind of 25-words-or-less concept that is the basis of most bad movies: Wouldn't it be funny if a bunch of Allied soldiers went undercover as assembly-line women in a German factory during World War II?

Continue reading: All The Queen's Men Review

Dancer In The Dark Review


Very Good

For years filmmakers have been trying to reinvent the musical. "Evita" went big, "My Best Friend's Wedding" sneaked musical numbers into its semi-standard romantic comedy, the "South Park" movie mocked the cartoon musical while besting it with genuinely catchy tunes, "Love's Labour's Lost" was an homage to the Fred and Ginger sing-songs of the 1930s.

But no one has succeeded in making a truly modern movie musical, one that employs emerging filmmaking techniques instead of reaching back 50 years for inspiration. In fact, no one has ever even attempted something like "Dancer In the Dark."

Writer and director Lars von Trier -- the reclusive Dane behind the minimalist Dogme95 movement that espouses natural lighting, no props and handheld cameras -- discovers a way to marry his trademark sparseness with the unfettered showmanship of song and dance numbers in this daring retooling of the musical genre.

Continue reading: Dancer In The Dark Review

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Upcoming releases: What's on our playlist for December 2019?

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Holy Moly & The Crackers journeyed down from their hometown of Newcastle Upon Tyne to play in Canterbury, where they thought they'd be playing to...

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Udo Kier Movies

Downsizing Trailer

Downsizing Trailer

Everyone is aware of the nation of Lilliput in Jonathan Swift's 'Gulliver's Travels', but what...

Brawl in Cell Block 99 Movie Review

Brawl in Cell Block 99 Movie Review

Filmmaker S. Craig Zahler brought a blast of offbeat creativity to the Western genre two...

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

Joe is a fiercely determined 50-year-old woman whose sexual drive has taken over her entire...

Iron Sky Trailer

Iron Sky Trailer

In the dying days of World War II, a secret Nazi space program evaded destruction...

Iron Sky Movie Review

Iron Sky Movie Review

What starts out as a quite promising gonzo pastiche sadly loses steam after the first...

Melancholia Movie Review

Melancholia Movie Review

Von Trier continues to challenge audiences with his bold, bleak storytelling. As always, he creates...

Melancholia Trailer

Melancholia Trailer

In a grand castle located in the beautiful countryside, Justine and Michael have married. They...

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My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done Movie Review

My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done Movie Review

There's no way that combining the geniuses of producer David Lynch and director Werner Herzog...

Bloodrayne Movie Review

Bloodrayne Movie Review

German director Uwe Boll is making a name for himself as a schlockster, methodically working...

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