Dana Carvey

Dana Carvey

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Dana Carvey seen performing at the KAABOO Music Festival 2016, Del Mar, California, United States - Friday 16th September 2016

Dana Carvey
Dana Carvey
Dana Carvey
Dana Carvey
Dana Carvey
Dana Carvey

The Secret Life Of Pets Review

Very Good

From the team behind Despicable Me and Minions, this high-energy adventure makes up for its rather simplistic story by filling the screen with lively characters, silly dialog and colourful animation. There's nothing terribly distinctive about the movie, as most of the gags feel recycled and everything bounces across the surface without generating any resonance either in the humour or emotions. But it's a lot of fun while it lasts.

In a cosy Manhattan apartment, the happy rescue dog Max (voiced by Louis C.K.) lives with his owner Katie (Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt's Ellie Kemper). The moment she steps out of the door on the way to work, he's already bored and waiting for her to come home. So he hangs out with the other pets in the neighbourhood, including lovelorn pomeranian Gidget (Jenny Slate) and food-obsessed cat Chloe (Lake Bell). Then Katie brings home another stray, the gigantic brown furball Duke (Eric Stonestreet), who immediately starts challenging Max's alpha-dog status. As war breaks out between them, they find themselves stranded in the city, caught up with a sewer-dwelling gang of abandoned pets led by the adorable but intense bunny Snowball (Kevin Hart). Meanwhile, Gidget and Chloe recruit some help to find them, including a grumpy hawk (Albert Brooks) and an ageing basset hound (Dana Carvey).

The plot basically consists of a series of chaotic chase sequences that build up to a climactic scene straight out of a Die Hard movie. Each character and plot element is over-constructed, which eliminates any sense of honest emotion or loose interaction, but the characters are likeable simply because they're so ridiculous. The animators use a lot of colour and a tactile variety of furry textures. And the actors have a lot of fun with the characters. Hart is, of course, the scene-stealer as the fast-talking kingpin who uses his cuteness as a weapon. And while C.K. and Stonestreet are endearing as the story's protagonists, it's Slate and Bell who win over the audience in the funniest, most complex roles.

Continue reading: The Secret Life Of Pets Review

Jack And Jill Trailer


Jack Sadelstein loves his family. He loves his wife, Erin and he loves his two children, Sofia and Gary. But the one family member he truly hates is his sister, Jill. Which is why Jack dreads Thanksgiving every year; it's the one time of the year where Jill travels up to see him to stay for a few days.

Continue: Jack And Jill Trailer

Dana Carvey and Tia Carrere - Dana Carvey and Tia Carrere Los Angeles, California - The Grand Opening of The Jon Lovitz Comedy Club held at Universal City Walk Thursday 28th May 2009

Dana Carvey and Tia Carrere

Dana Carvey out and Dana Carvey Wednesday 14th November 2007 Dana Carvey out and about in Midtown

Dana Carvey Out and Dana Carvey

Little Nicky Review


Terrible

Having now seen "Little Nicky," in which Adam Sandler plays the retarded son of Satan, I have formulated a hypothesis I'm calling the Sandler Theory of Exponentially Obnoxious Returns. It goes something like this:

Adam Sandler goes out of his way to make each gimmick character he plays ("Billy Madison," "Happy Gilmore") more grating than the last, just to see how far he can push it before his easily amused fan base will turn on him.

His most detestable character to date had been "The Waterboy," but that Southern-fried dope was mister congeniality compared to Nicky, the little devil that couldn't. Sandler spends this entire movie with his face screwed up in a hit-by-a-shovel grimace and speaking in a silly, raspy voice like a little kid pretending to be sick so he can stay home from school. There's no joke here. It's just Sandler's version of stretching as an actor.

Continue reading: Little Nicky Review

Master Of Disguise Review


Terrible

"The funny voices? The silly faces? They were funny for about one second," says a woman breaking the heart of Pistachio Disguisey (Dana Carvey) in the nitwit kiddie spy flick "Master of Disguise."

She couldn't be more right. In a transparently desperate attempt at a career comeback, Carvey hams like a bad Christmas dinner as Pistachio, a clumsy twit of an Italian waiter who learns that he comes from a long line of disguise experts who have been "protecting the world from evil over the centuries."

For no explained reason, his father (James Brolin) has kept the family history a secret from Pistachio. But when Pistachio's mom and dad are kidnapped by their old arch-enemy -- a black-market art collector named Devlin Bowman (Brent Spiner) -- Grandpa (Harold Gould) shows up to train Pistachio for a rescue mission designed to showcase Carvey's ability to affect an endless array of annoying personas.

Continue reading: Master Of Disguise Review

Dana Carvey

Dana Carvey Quick Links

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Actor


Dana Carvey Movies

The Secret Life of Pets Movie Review

The Secret Life of Pets Movie Review

From the team behind Despicable Me and Minions, this high-energy adventure makes up for its...

Jack And Jill Trailer

Jack And Jill Trailer

Jack Sadelstein loves his family. He loves his wife, Erin and he loves his two...

Little Nicky Movie Review

Little Nicky Movie Review

Having now seen "Little Nicky," in which Adam Sandler plays the retarded son of Satan,...

Master Of Disguise Movie Review

Master Of Disguise Movie Review

"The funny voices? The silly faces? They were funny for about one second," says a...

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