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Bolt Trailer


Bolt is a super-dog! He’s got his own TV show and his life on camera is full of adventure, the reality is of course that he’s not a super dog, he’s just a normal pup who happens to be on TV, so when he accidentally finds himself in New York city, trying to distinguish between on screen stunts and real life situations becomes pretty hard! Along the way Bolt makes some friends who help him find his way back home to owner and co-star Penny!

Continue: Bolt Trailer

Bolt Review


Very Good
If action "auteur" Michael Bay trained dogs instead of constructing Transformers, his canines would probably behave like Bolt.

Disney's computer-animated mutt (voiced by John Travolta) defends his beloved owner, Penny (Miley Cyrus), from the evil forces of Dr. Calico (Malcolm McDowell) by head-butting semi-trucks, dangling from speeding locomotives, catapulting over military helicopters, and shooting laser beams from his eyes.

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Doomsday Review


Bad
Step aside, zombie films -- there's a new derivative genre in town. The post-apocalyptic thriller is out to trump your ongoing redundancy. Instead of bringing something new to the dystopian brave new world, writer/director Neil Marshall's Doomsday has simply decided to reference each and every offering in the oeuvre. A substantial slip from his championed efforts (Dog Soldiers and The Descent), this Escape from Newcastle calamity is like watching George Miller channel John Carpenter. Toss in a little Aliens, a few medieval riffs, and enough Mad Max references to choke Mel Gibson's ego and you've got a disaster pretending to be profound.

When the Reaper virus devastates Glasgow, the British government quarantines all of Scotland. A few survivors make it out. The rest are locked behind heavy steel walls and guarded gates. Nearly three decades later, the plague reappears, this time in downtown London. Desperate to find a cure, Cabinet Minister Caranis (David O'Hara) gets Police Chief Nelson (Bob Hoskins) to send his top officer back into the hot zone. He chooses lady loose cannon Eden Sinclair (Rhona Mitra). Her goal? Lead a group of soldiers to Kane (Malcolm McDowell), a doctor who was once in charge of Reaper research. Seems the satellites have been picking up images of humans in the supposedly uninhabitable realm, and if Kane has found a cure, they may be able to stop the insidious disease.

Continue reading: Doomsday Review

Between Strangers Review


Very Good
Between Strangers? Hmmm, sounds like a softcore porn movie. Turns out it's a weepy melodrama starring a generation-bounding collection of movie stars.

Ever since Short Cuts won accolades, we get a yearly version of this movie, a sometimes thoughtful collection of stories, none large enough to stand alone as a feature film, some to slight to merit any attention at all. Between Strangers mitigates this problem by focusing on the stories of three women, all wrestling with past mistakes or old regrets.

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Tempo Review


Terrible
No matter how large your crush on Rachael Leigh Cook might be, do not see Tempo. It'll ruin your image of her forever. In this pathetic film, Cook is an oblivious American inexplicably brought to Paris to work in an ultra-luxe jewelry shop -- which is in the midst of being cased by a young robber (Hugh Dancy) and his geriatric girlfriend (Melanie Griffith). Love triangle develops, and robbery goes badly (we see it's aftermath, Reservoir Dogs-style, in the first scene). Unfortunately, Tempo needs to up its body count by at least three, and in the first 10 minutes of the film, to merit anything beyond a "you must avoid this film!" rating.

Just Visiting Review


Good
In 1993, director Jean-Marie Poiré created a small comedy sensation about two 12th century Frenchmen (played by Jean Reno and popular French comic actor Christian Clavier) who are mistakenly transported to the modern world. The film made nearly $100 million worldwide and was never released theatrically in the US.

It's eight years later, and Poiré has directed another small comedy about two 12th century Frenchmen (hmm, played by Jean Reno and that same popular French guy) who are mistakenly transported to Chicago 2000. Hey, wait a minute!

Continue reading: Just Visiting Review

Gangster No. 1 Review


OK
Sometimes, a film just goes beyond its means. Gangster No. 1 is just such a film. With a lukewarm gangster drama script, over-the-top performances from such actors as David Thewlis, Malcolm McDowell, and Paul Bettany, and Paul McGuigan's (The Acid House) exaggerated directing style, it just falls apart like Jell-O left in the sun.

Gangster No. 1 feels like pieces a bunch of other, better movies slapped together -- GoodFellas' musical selections, the violence from American Psycho and Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, a dash of any Quentin Tarantino or Guy Ritchie style of editing, Malcolm McDowell in a performance recalling A Clockwork Orange. Some of it's fun, but it just isn't original or creative.

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Just Visiting Review


OK

Imagine "Crocodile Dundee" with a 12th Century knight in Chicago instead of a leathery lifelong Outbacker in New York, and you've pretty much got the crux of "Just Visiting," a slapsticky, Hollywood remake of 1993's slapsticky French mega-hit "Les Visiteurs."

Jean Reno and Christian Clavier reprise their roles from the original as Count Thibault of Malfete and his groveling servant-sidekick André, who are transported to modern times by a wizard's miscalculated spell.

How they have the dumb luck to materialize in a Chicago history museum where a Malfete descendent (Christina Applegate) is in charge of the 12th Century France exhibit isn't explained. In fact, the vast majority of the movie is dependent on the audience blindly accepting supremely stupid plot holes. But somehow director Jean-Marie Gaubert (also returning from the '93 version) manages to keep this fish-out-of-water stuff amusing, even though the film seems a little too pleased with its own self-aware cartoony-ness.

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The Company Review


OK

The title sequence of Robert Altman's "The Company," a fictional verite peek behind the curtain of Chicago's Joffrey Ballet, consists of a conceptual dance with rainbow lighting and iridescent strips of fabric used to create a constantly shifting web behind and among the lissome and lively dancers.

Their accompanyment is music seemingly harvested from electronic scales -- bloops and bleeps like something out of "Logan's Run." The cinematography provides the audience's perspective, as well as some shots from the back of the stage looking outward, some from just offstage, silhouetting performers in lighting from vertical scaffolds, and some from high within the scaffolding itself.

There are several such sequences throughout the film (they represent passages of time -- one performance for each season at the Ballet), but this first dance literally sets the stage. Altman is metaphorically announcing his intention to spy on every aspect of his subject from the locker rooms and practice barres to covetous company politics and interpersonal cattiness to calluses, injuries and affairs interfering with ambition.

Continue reading: The Company Review

Malcolm Mcdowell

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Malcolm McDowell

Date of birth

13th June, 1943

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.74


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Malcolm McDowell Movies

Lessons In Love Trailer

Lessons In Love Trailer

Richard Haig is a remarkably intelligent, charming, ageing poetry professor, whose life away from the...

Antiviral Movie Review

Antiviral Movie Review

It may be style over substance, but Brandon Cronenberg cleverly blends his father David's love...

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Excision Movie Review

Excision Movie Review

There's an element of parody to this jet-black comedy, but the film is so creepy...

Vamps Trailer

Vamps Trailer

Stacey and Goody are two vampires cursed to remain young and beautiful forever after being...

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer

Heather Mason is now a teenager and has grown up running away from dark forces...

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A Green Story Trailer

A Green Story Trailer

Trailer for A Green StoryUpcoming movie A Green Story does exactly what it says on...

The Artist Trailer

The Artist Trailer

George Valentin is a silent movie star in 1920's Hollywood. His latest film, A Russian...

The Artist Movie Review

The Artist Movie Review

Made as a 1920s-style silent movie, this hugely enjoyable film is already a classic. And...

Easy A Trailer

Easy A Trailer

Olive is a straight up girl, she works hard in classes, she isn't one of...

Bolt Trailer

Bolt Trailer

Bolt is a super-dog! He’s got his own TV show and his life on camera...

Doomsday Movie Review

Doomsday Movie Review

Step aside, zombie films -- there's a new derivative genre in town. The post-apocalyptic thriller...

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