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Logan Review

Excellent

Hugh Jackman returns to his signature role one last time (so he says), reuniting with filmmaker James Mangold, who also directed 2013's The Wolverine. But this doesn't feel like any other X-Men movie; it strikes a sombre, gritty tone from the start to take the audience on a dark and rather brutal road trip. So while it feels rather long and repetitive, the movie also has a strong emotional kick.

It's set in the year 2029, when mutants have been wiped off the planet, and no new ones have been born for years. Hiding out in a drunken haze as a Texas limo driver, Logan aka Wolverine (Jackman) has stashed Charles aka Professor X (Patrick Stewart) across the border in Mexico, watched over by albino caretaker Caliban (Stephen Merchant). Then a nurse (Elizabeth Rodriguez) appears asking for Logan's help to transport the young Laura (Dafne Keen) to North Dakota. And Laura clearly has a genetic connection with Logan. It also turns out that she has escaped from a Mexico City hospital, so as Logan, Charles and Laura hit the road, the ruthless henchman Pierce (Boyd Holbrook) and sinister Dr Rice (Richard E. Grant) are hot on their trail.

Mangold holds all of this in careful control, never tipping over into the usual whiz-bang Hollywood superhero action chaos (the violence is especially grisly). The story moves at a steady pace that adds an involving note of desperation to each sequence. This also makes the movie feel a bit repetitive and even wheel-spinning at times. Since the baddies are able to stay right on the heroes' heels, it's clear that even a nicely offhandedly sojourn with a farmer (Eriq La Salle) and his family will be short-lived. But the gnawing intensity, while never quite building into proper suspense, gets deep under the skin as it fleshes out the characters.

Continue reading: Logan Review

Logan Trailer


In an almost fourth-wall-breaking episode, the latest installment of the Wolverine movie series acknowledges the 'X-Men' comic book series. But this time Logan is far from the superhero his fans are reading about. Age has finally caught up with him - as it does with everyone - and he's no longer as fast or as agile as he used to be. His injuries don't heal as quickly as they used to either, but he's not the only one dealing with the crippling effect of old age. He's currently caring for Professor X in a hide-out, but their lives are about to become disrupted once again with the arrival of a new mutant. Laura is an 11-year-old girl with powers and abilities that match Logan's own. There are dark forces closing in on her, however, and as much as she is capable of taking care of herself, she needs guidance, protection and discipline from somebody who knows her struggle.

Continue: Logan Trailer

For No Good Reason Trailer


Ralph Steadman is a widely known cartoonist broadly considered one of the most fundamental artists of contemporary culture with his often horrific drawings that never once reflected his warm personality. He has had his intriguing, maniacal works feature in various medias from newspapers to books, the most well-known of which was 1971's 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'; a novel by his American friend Hunter S. Thompson. Thompson was a journalist who often worked alongside Steadman and making famous after coining the term 'Gonzo journalism' - a form of first person writing that was particularly personal. Steadman now takes us on a journey of the last 15 years, looking back over his drawing style and what influenced him to create his unique paintings.

Continue: For No Good Reason Trailer

Dom Hemingway - Red Band Trailer


Dom Hemingway is a rather adept safecracker with serious anger issues and an addiction to drinking, women and partying. Having just completed a draining 12-year stint in prison, he's desperate to make up for lost time by teaming up with his old partner Dickie who has agreed to assist him in tracking down the money owed to him by his former boss Mr. Fontaine. On the way, there's plenty of boozing, sex and debauchery, but he's not happy when Fontaine offers him a price smaller than what Dom thinks his decade of silence is worth. Needless to say, the money doesn't last long as it disappears during one major bender; however, there's more than just money on his mind. His young daughter has grown up and is now a mother and he finds himself eager to rebuild a relationship with her. But making a fresh start after 12 years of absence is harder than expected.

Continue: Dom Hemingway - Red Band Trailer

Dom Hemingway Review


OK

Definitely a film of two halves, this crime comedy kicks off with a spark of witty energy as the title character blusters his way through a series of events with hilariously profane rants. Then the plot kicks in. And from here on, it's a dull slog as we lose all interest in what happens next. It's well-played and stylishly directed, but it feels pointless.

We meet Dom Hemingway (Law) just before he gets out of prison after serving 12 years for refusing to rat out his boss Ivan (Bichir), a Russian mobster now living the high life on the French Riviera. So Dom and his sardonic friend Dicky (Grant) travel from London to see Ivan. After a very rocky start caused by Dom's loose tongue, they're in the middle of wildly hedonistic holiday when things take a sudden turn. Dom finds himself penniless back in England, turning to his daughter Evelyn (Clarke) for help. When she refuses to talk to him, he seeks work from a young thug (Hunter).

Up until the mid-point plot-shift, the film is a lot of fun, mainly because Dom's tirades are riotously rude but still have a literary lilt to them. This man clearly has no filter on what he says or does, so he goes from one spot of trouble to another. Law plays him with gusto, winning us over in the comical first half then struggling to keep even a hint of sympathy in the much mopier drama that follows. Frankly, we begin to think that Dom is finally getting what he deserves; we certainly don't want him to come out on top.

Continue reading: Dom Hemingway Review

For No Good Reason - Clip


Often considered as one of the most important artists of contemporary culture, Ralph Steadman is a well-known cartoonist whose usually satirical works were featured everywhere from newspapers and magazines to original and re-prints of books. During this time he frequently worked alongside his overseas pal Hunter S. Thompson, a journalist famous for coining the term 'Gonzo' journalism; a type of writing that is especially inclusive of the writer and usually written in first person. Steadman is now the only living co-creator of the writing style and takes us on a journey over the past fifteen years showing us his artwork development and the central themes that inspired his drawing process while giving us insight into his life, his troubles and his various friendships over the years.

Continue: For No Good Reason - Clip

Can 'Khumba' Earn Those Stripes? Let The Sub-Saharan Adventure Begin! [Trailer + Pictures]


Steve Buscemi Liam Neeson Laurence Fishburne Richard E. Grant Jake T. Austin Catherine Tate

When Khumba – a zebra with a lack of markings – is born into a superstitious herd, his fellow species think it’s a bad sign. And, much to young Khumba’s detriment, a potentially deadly drought soon follows his birth. But instead of letting his fellow zebras vilify him, he attempts to find a watering hole.

KhumbaHey, it's Khumba

In doing so, he meets a wide range of brilliantly funny, scary and loyal characters along way. There’s Phango, the dangerous leopard who controls the waterholes and terrorizes the animals in the Great Karoo, played by Liam Neeson.

Continue reading: Can 'Khumba' Earn Those Stripes? Let The Sub-Saharan Adventure Begin! [Trailer + Pictures]

Khumba Trailer


Khumba is a young zebra who was born missing half of his stripes. Following his birth, there came a deadly drought threatening the survival of the herd and killing his mother. To his superstitious peers and his father, Khumba's unusual appearance is an extremely bad omen and he is eventually driven to run away from the herd to find water and acceptance elsewhere, leaving his only friend in Great Karoo, Tombi. On his travels, he meets a motherly wildebeest named Mama V and her wacky friend Bradley the Ostrich who are willing to travel with him and protect him from the ills of the wild, namely Phango the Leopard whose presence is a threat to every other creature in Great Karoo. He also meets Mantis, who reveals a map that could lead them to a waterhole - or will it instead lead Khumba to find his stripes? 

'Khumba' is a heart-warming animated flick about that timeless message of accepting people's differences. It has been directed by Anthony Silverston in first direction, who co-wrote the screenplay alongside previous writing partner Raffaella Delle Donne ('Zambezia'). It was nominated for a Cristal award for best feature at the 2013 Annecy International Animated Film Festival and has already been released in the US.

Click here to read - Khumba Movie Review

Jude Law, Richard E. Grant And Emilia Clarke Talk About Their Dom Hemingway Roles [Video]


Jude Law Richard E. Grant Emilia Clarke

In Dom Hemingway, Jude Law plays a man bent on getting his just deserves. Having spent 12 years in prison, keeping his mouth shut like a good boy and eating his porridge, he’s back on the streets of London.

Don Hemingway, Jude Law's bumSee what Jude Law got up to as Dom Hemingway?

Larger than life, outspoken and vulgar, this was a chance for Law to let loose, as he explained on the red carpet at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Continue reading: Jude Law, Richard E. Grant And Emilia Clarke Talk About Their Dom Hemingway Roles [Video]

Dom Hemingway Trailer


Dom Hemingway has recently completed a 12-year stint in prison for his criminal exploits as a talented safecracker but, needless to say, he is anything but reformed. On his release, he meets up with his balding, glove-wearing partner Dickie who helps him track down his old gangster boss Mr. Fontaine to retrieve a large sum of money owed to him for keeping his silence on his criminal past for so long. The first thing he does when he gets hold of it? He throws a massive, alcohol-fuelled, women-laden party to celebrate his freedom, but with dire consequences. When he wakes up outside in the worst state he's been in for a while, he realises that his money has completely disappeared, but that's not the only thing he has to seek out. His daughter Evelyn is now a mother, and he's determined to re-build a relationship and get to know his grandson. However, getting his life on track proves more difficult than he imagined.

This gritty British crime thriller has been directed and written by Primetime Emming winning Richard Shepard ('The Matador', 'The Hunting Party', 'Oxygen'). It has a wicked humour in all the right places but looks like it could be a pretty touching story too. It is set to be released on November 15th 2013.

Click here to read Dom Hemingway Movie Review

Could Jude Law's Dom Hemingway Be THE Performance Of 2013?


Jude Law Richard E. Grant

The Oscars race for best actor may well be a three way fight between Chiwatel Ejiofor, Robert Redford and Matthew McConaughey, though the performance of Jude Law as British gangster Dom Hemingway is making waves on both sides of the Atlantic and should feature prominently at the BAFTAs at least.

Watch the Dom Hemingway trailer:

The movie, titled Dom Hemingway, is from the writer-director of Matador, Richard Shepard. It debuted to strong reviews at Toronto Film Festival though most of the praise was focused squarely on Law himself, who put on two stone in weight and sported a receding hairline to play the sleazy safecracker out to collect money owed to him for doing his time.

Continue reading: Could Jude Law's Dom Hemingway Be THE Performance Of 2013?

Peter Capaldi, The First 'Doctor Who' With An Oscar. Oh, You Didn't Know?


Peter Capaldi Richard E. Grant Ken Stott Ewan McGregor Kate Hudson

Peter Capaldi is a modest man. You'd never hear him boasting about winning an Oscar. Yep, the Glasgow-born actor, named as the new Time Lord last week, has more in his locker than the foul-mouthed and brilliant spin-doctor Malcolm Tucker from The Thick of It.

In 1995, Forrest Gump fended off competition from Pulp Fiction, The Shawshank Redemption and Four Weddings and a Funeral to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Tom Hanks beat Morgan Freeman, Paul Newman and John Travolta to Best Actor, Jessica Lange for Best Actress for Blue Sky and Robert Zemeckis won Best Director.

However, look further down the list of winners and you'll find him. Peter Capaldi, winner of the Academy Award for Live Action Short Film for Franz Kafka's It's A Wonderful Life. Ok, so he tied the award with Peggy Rajski and Randy Stone's Trevor, but he still won.

Continue reading: Peter Capaldi, The First 'Doctor Who' With An Oscar. Oh, You Didn't Know?

Bram Stoker Turns 165: In Praise Of Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula


Gary Oldman Francis Ford Coppola Anthony Hopkins Richard E. Grant

Bram Stoker, the Irish novelist who created Dracula, was born 165 years ago today (November 8, 2012). Google's latest doodle celebrates the author, who wrote 19 books in total though will always be best known for his vampire creation.

Dracula was actually Stoker's fifth book, published in 1897 after he'd spent several years studying mythological stories and folklore. He took most of his inspiration after staying in the North Yorkshire seaside town of Whitby, where he was trying to establish if the location would be suitable for a family holiday. Though not an initial bestseller, Dracula has since become a key text in vampire literature and the horror fiction canon and has spawned numerous television series and movie adaptations. Overblown in the most positive sense of the word, Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula (1992) put the horror back into Dracula, after decades of camp interpretations. Starring Gary Oldman as the Count himself, the film boasted a stellar cast that also included Sir Anthony Hopkins, Winona Ryder, Richard E. Grant and Keanu Reeves. Writing for the New York Times, Vincent Canby said, "With Dracula it's apparent that Mr. Coppola's talent and exuberance survive," while Todd McCarthy of Variety wrote, "Overall, this Dracula could have been less heavy and more deliciously evil than it is, but it does offer a sumptuous engorgement of the senses."

The movie won a flurry of technical awards, including the Oscar for Best Costume Design, Best Sound Effects Editing and Best Makeup. Coppola and Oldman also won the Saturn Awards for Best Director and Best Actor respectively.

Continue reading: Bram Stoker Turns 165: In Praise Of Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula

How To Stop Being A Loser Review


Weak
This British rom-com has enough energy to keep us watching even though it's not particularly funny or romantic. Fortunately there are enough bright sparks in the cast to distract us from the simplistic script and over-egged direction.

James (Phillips) is a geeky misfit who has a sign above his head saying "loser". Literally. After his friend Ian (Grant) commits suicide, he receives a message from him that challenges him to learn how to talk to women. His friends (Leonidas and Grezo) encourage him to try, starting with an awkward chat at Ian's funeral with his school crush Hannah (Atkinson). He then starts a mentorship with cocky motivational speaker Ampersand (Conway), a disciple of womanising writer guru Zeus (Kemp). But this will require changing almost everything about himself.

Continue reading: How To Stop Being A Loser Review

First Night Trailer


Adam is a wealthy businessman and an amateur opera singer who aspires to a more cultured lifestyle. Despite his love for opera, Adam's friends tease him, saying he's no more than a 'city suit' and to prove them all wrong, Adam decides to put on an opera at his lavish stately home in the country side.

Continue: First Night Trailer

Horrid Henry: The Movie Trailer


Henry's never meant to be horrid, but that's just what all the adults (and some children) consider him. If there are worms in someone's sandwich or if there's itching powder in your bed, you can bet Henry's the one who's done it.

Continue: Horrid Henry: The Movie Trailer

Hudson Hawk Review


OK
The good thing about comedies, as a general rule, is that they're too bland to have really bad plots. The search for laughs seldom strays too far off the beaten path established by the social mores of the target market, be that old ladies, stoners, or teenagers out on dates. There are comedies with solid plots, just rarely comedies with complicated plots.

What they generally aren't is full of capers designed by crackheads in search of comic relief, or a dominatrix dying to destroy the gold market with a Da Vinci alchemy machine only a cat burglar from Hoboken could steal.

Continue reading: Hudson Hawk Review

The Little Vampire Review


Good
Just when you thought movies couldn't get any more ridiculous, along comes a film that poses the question, "Did Dracula ever have a teddy bear?" I'm talking, of course, about The Little Vampire, a movie about a nuclear family of vampires that feed on cows, live in Scotland, and make friends with the little kid from Jerry Maguire.

In The Little Vampire, Jonathan Lipnicki plays Tony Thompson, recent émigré to the Highlands. Rather than go the traditional route for Scottish fantasy and pick up a wooden sword and proclaim, "There can be only one," Tony begins dreaming of vampires. Night after night, Tony's slumber is disturbed as he dreams of a rite being performed by a clan of vampires. What it means, Tony has no clue. So Tony simply does what any other eight-year old stereotyped by cinema does: Goes to mommy (Pamela Gidley) and daddy (Tommy Hinkley), sleeps in their bed for the night, and then gets ridiculed by everyone he knows for his "wild vampire fantasies" during the day.

Continue reading: The Little Vampire Review

The Portrait Of A Lady Review


Very Good
Jesus, I didn't realize when I went to the movies this morning I was going to have to think!

But seriously, that's what you're going to be doing if you see The Portrait of a Lady -- Jane Campion's follow-up to The Piano, based on Henry James's "classic" novel that you've probably never read. Now, I'm wishing that I had, though, because Portrait is a fantastic movie to watch, exquisitely crafted and painstakingly detailed, gorgeously photographed and full of style -- but it is just plain impossible to follow.

Continue reading: The Portrait Of A Lady Review

The Little Vampire Review


Terrible

If Jonathan Lipnicki is washed up at 18 and looking back on his career as a button-cute child star, "The Little Vampire" is will very likely be the picture that embarrasses him most.

A quick, sloppy production of a throwaway script about a little boy who befriends a family of bloodsuckers and helps them recover a magic amulet, it suffers from a pungent collective apathy that wafts off the screen from the cast and crew. The little kids in the picture seem like they're just playing vampire in grandma's dusty attic and not really trying to participate in the plot. The grown-ups in the cast (including respectable actors like Richard E. Grant and John Wood) give let's-get-this-over-with performances and most scenes feel like the director didn't say "Cut!" so much as "Oh that's good enough let's just move on."

Lipnicki ("Stuart Little," "Jerry Maguire") plays Tony, a kid from California who has just moved into a small, renovated Scottish castle with his completely vanilla mother (Pamela Gidley) and father (Tommy Hinkley), a golf course designer hired to build new links for a local lord (Wood).

Continue reading: The Little Vampire Review

Richard E. Grant

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Richard E. Grant Movies

The Hitman's Bodyguard Movie Review

The Hitman's Bodyguard Movie Review

It really doesn't matter that this movie is utterly ridiculous, because the central pairing of...

Their Finest Movie Review

Their Finest Movie Review

Skilfully written, directed and acted, this offbeat British period film tells a story that catches...

The Hitmans Bodyguard Trailer

The Hitmans Bodyguard Trailer

An AAA-rated executive protection agent (Ryan Reynolds) is charged with protecting the most wanted hitman...

Logan Movie Review

Logan Movie Review

Hugh Jackman returns to his signature role one last time (so he says), reuniting with...

Logan Trailer

Logan Trailer

In an almost fourth-wall-breaking episode, the latest installment of the Wolverine movie series acknowledges the...

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Jackie Movie Review

Jackie Movie Review

Rather than make a standard biopic about the most famous First Lady in American history,...

Their Finest Trailer

Their Finest Trailer

It's the early 1940s and World War II is in full swing. Bombs are raining...

Logan Trailer

Logan Trailer

Not even a mutant can be powerful forever. Logan aka Wolverine is dealing with the...

Jackie Trailer

Jackie Trailer

Jacqueline Bouvier was always a highly independent woman, even when she was a debutant; she...

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Queen And Country Trailer

Queen And Country Trailer

Basic training for the Korean War is tough on a group of young British cadets....

Khumba Movie Review

Khumba Movie Review

When this South African animated adventure embraces its unique setting and characters, it's visually stunning...

For No Good Reason Trailer

For No Good Reason Trailer

Ralph Steadman is a widely known cartoonist broadly considered one of the most fundamental artists...

Dom Hemingway Trailer

Dom Hemingway Trailer

Dom Hemingway is a rather adept safecracker with serious anger issues and an addiction to...

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