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Chips Review

Terrible

It's clear from the very start that this movie has little to do with the 1977-1983 beloved hit TV series. Firstly, the film ignores the capitalisation that would make sense of the title. And the main characters, while they have familiar names, are completely different people. So fans of the show will be justifiably angry that it has been merely referenced to make a half-hearted mash-up of The Hangover and Fast & Furious. Which might not be a bad idea if the gross-out comedy was funny and the action was even remotely thrilling.

In this version, Poncharello is the undercover name assigned to a Miami FBI agent (Michael Pena) who is sent to Los Angeles to investigate a string of armoured car robberies that might involve dirty cops. He is partnered with officer Jon Baker (Dax Shepard) riding motorcycles with the California Highway Patrol (they're CHiPs, not Chips). Jon is a former hotshot off-road motorbike champ who has broken every bone in his body and has only joined the police to try to win back his estranged, monstrous wife (Kristen Bell). But he's such a high-energy idiot that he's starting the job on probation. As their case develops, it's instantly clear that the mastermind is the villainous officer Kurtz (Vincent D'Onofrio). And their investigation is complicated by the arrival of Ponch's FBI boss (Isiah Whitlock Jr.) and partner (Adam Brody).

The lazy script never tries to crank up any real mystery or tension in the plot. Instead, the film is just a series of smutty jokes and incoherent stunt sequences, plus running gags that never reach a punchline. All of this is infused with relentless sexism, as the camera leers shamelessly at every woman. And the laddish misogyny is accompanied by constant homophobia, which is addressed in the dialogue in a feeble attempt to undercut the baldfaced bigotry. This makes all of the characters resolutely unlikeable. Ponch and Jon are such self-absorbed jerks that it's inconceivable that they would ever be allowed to be policemen.

Continue reading: Chips Review

Rings Trailer


It's been 13 years since the horror cycle of the legend of Samara was apparently broken, but it seems she has not killed her last victim yet. When Holt decides to investigate the curse (which has now faded into urban legend), he is rescued by his girlfriend Julia who watches the fatal tape instead of him online, giving herself seven days to live. Those seven days prove to be a terror-filled nightmare; she is haunted by supernatural forces and her telephone burns a Braille message into her palm. She and Holt decide to investigate deeper into the mystery and try to find a way to end the curse before it's too late. They visit a blind man named Burke who tells them that the message on her hand reads 'rebirth', and informs them that they have opened a door which has endangered everyone. Because one thing that nobody new about the legendary videotape was that there was actually a movie within the movie. 

Continue: Rings Trailer

The Magnificent Seven Review

Good

Director Antoine Fuqua brings his usual fascination with violence to this remake of the iconic 1960 Western, itself a remake of the masterful 1954 Japanese original Seven Samurai. Reteaming with his Training Day stars Denzel Washington and Ethan Hawke, Fuqua injects some very manly grit into the tale of a ragtag gang of mercenaries who find themselves trying to save a town in peril. It's a great story, and Fuqua delivers plenty of punch in the action set-pieces. But the characters and situations never quite rise beyond the usual Wild West cliches, and toning everything down for the required PG-13 rating creates an oddly celebratory tone, as if the brutality isn't that bad, really.

In a peaceful village in the middle of nowhere, greedy corporate baron Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard) has discovered gold, so he decides to buy up everyone's land. When the homesteaders resist, Bogue turns vicious, and the newly widowed Emma (Haley Bennett) refuses to go quietly. Instead, she hires notorious gunslinger Chisolm (Washington), who in turn rustles up six more desperados: hard-drinking sharpshooter Faraday (Chris Pratt), fading legend Goodnight (Hawke), burly bear-man Horne (Vincent D'Onofrio), blade expert Billy (Byung-hun Lee), Mexican outlaw Vasquez (Manuel Garcia-Rulfo) and Native American warrior Red Harvest (Martin Sensmeier). Not only do they need to become a team, but they need to teach these timid farmers how to fight against Bogue's approaching army.

Screenwriters Nic Pizzolatto and Richard Wenk have reduced the plot to the bare basics: scrappy good guys versus a slick, well-organised villain. There's never a compelling reason why Bogue wants the farmland (is there gold under the cornfields?), but he's clearly willing to kill everyone and level the entire town to get it. In this sense, Sarsgaard has the least subtle role in the film, but he has a great time snarling and shouting and generally being the devil incarnate. But then all of the roles are fairly simplified, with each of the seven teammates having a basic trait to combine with their general heroism: cool, cheeky, weary, quirky, flashy, rambunctious and lethal, respectively.

Continue reading: The Magnificent Seven Review

The Magnificent Seven Trailer


After the murder of her husband, a widow and resident of the town of Rose Creek finds herself seeking revenge over the brutal methods of Bartholomew Bogue, the man responsible for the death of her partner. Bartholomew is a ruthless industrialist and has his sights set on the town of Rose Creek and will go to any lengths to take it from the residents.

The widow makes contact with a bounty hunter named Sam Chisolm who agrees to help her look for gun fighters to help protect the town. Though the money is little, Chisolm begins his search for skilled gun slingers who might be able to help lead the resistance against Bogue. Amongst the recruits are Josh Farraday, Goodnight Robicheaux, Jack Horne, Billy Rocks, Vasquez and Red Harvest. What begins as purely a monetary commitment for the men soon turns into something far more personal when they experience first-hand the lengths Bogue is willing to go to.

The Magnificent Seven is a remake of the 1960 movie which originally starred Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach and Steve McQueen. The new version of the movie follows a similar plot which has been adapted and written by True Detective writer Nic Pizzolatto and Richard Wenk. The score was composed by James Horner shortly before his death in 2015.

Run All Night Trailer


Jimmy Conlon is a former hit man for the mob whose life of crime have left many mental scars. His best friend is the mob boss Shawn Maguire, but things get complicated for their relationship when Conlon's son Mike finds himself being hunted down by Maguire's own boy Danny. In a bid to defend his son, Jimmy arrives on the scene and shoots Danny dead. Jimmy knows the drill and after a meeting with Shawn realises he must do everything within his power to keep Mike from being killed by the rest of the gang, as he and his family are targeted once again. Jimmy is forced to kill old friends as he takes on the most dangerous task of his life, in taking care of the family he has led to death. Meanwhile, he's on the run from a police officer desperate to put him behind bars for his past crimes.

Continue: Run All Night Trailer

Fire With Fire Trailer


Jeremy Coleman is a firefighter who is looking forward to a night of celebrations with his workmates after a particularly taxing day on the job. However, as he stops by a convenience store to pick up some snacks his life takes a horrific turn when a racist gangster by the name of David Hagan shoots dead the owner and his son. Jeremy manages to escape scot-free and is able to identify the killer through a two way mirror at the police station. However, Hagan wastes no time in letting him know that he knows who he is and where to find him so Jeremy is put under witness protection under the name of Jeremy Douglas. He soon becomes romantically attached to his FBI escort Talia Durham so when she is nearly shot dead by one of Hagan's men, Jeremy ignores police orders and vows to hunt his adversary down.

'Fire With Fire' is a US crime thriller set to be released worldwide soon. It has been directed by movie stuntman David Barrett (who has worked as a TV director on episodes of 'V', 'The Mentalist' and 'Castle') in his feature film debut and written by Tom O'Connor who also makes his screenwriting debut. It will hit worldwide theatres from March 8th 2013.

Sinister Review


Very Good

There's a nasty edge to this horror film that makes it much creepier than most, which gives Hawke the chance to give an unnervingly haunted performance. As the script reveals its hideous secrets, the filmmakers really make our skin crawl. Although it's not easy to figure out what the point is, since the whole film seems to be merely an exercise in scaring the audience.

It's all based in true crime, as author Ellison (Hawke) drags his wife Tracy (Rylance) and kids to a new town so he can investigate another unsolved murder. What he hasn't told Tracy is that they're living in the crime scene, an unusually dark house that has a box of home movies in the attic that reveal a much more gruesome horror than Ellison was expecting. The killings at hand turn out to be part of a string of hideous murders that seem to have a supernatural twist.

Indeed, this film takes a very bleak trip into the darkest recesses of the imagination: the deaths on these home movies are so hideous that we can barely watch them. But then, this also means that the film is more unnerving than nine out of 10 horror movies. And Hawke is a solid central character we can identify with, as he's unable to stop digging into the story, looking further into these murders and watching every last home movie even though he knows he should really stop. He gives Ellison an earthy honesty that carries us along with him, even when some standard movie characters pop up, including an angry sheriff (Thompson), his dopey deputy (Ransone) and an expert professor (D'Onofrio).

Continue reading: Sinister Review

Sinister Trailer


Ellison is an aspiring true-crime writer who decides to move his family into the house where a family of four were brutally murdered nine months previous in order to work on his next novel which he is determined will be a success. When Ellison takes a visit to the attic, he finds, in the center of the floor, a single box with a movie projector and several film reels tucked inside. The films have titles such as 'BBQ '79' and 'Family Hanging Out '11' - the latter is the most recent so Ellison sets it up on the projector. The clip shows the family that were recently murdered enjoying one another's company before cutting to an image of the four of them when they killed. Shocked, Ellison passes the videos on to the police to investigate further and notices the only similarity between all the murders of different families in the house on each of the film reels is a recurring symbol which he later discovers is the mark of a pagan deity named Bagul who he is told feeds on the souls of children. Legend has it that children who see the image of Bagul are vulnerable to his attack because he is alive through his own image. When he begins to target Ellison's family, he realises he must escape before they become the next victims.

Continue: Sinister Trailer

Spanish Judges Review


Weak
Try to contain your enthusiasm for this one.

A self-proclaimed thriller "in the tradition of The Spanish Prisoner and Reservoir Dogs," Spanish Judges is more akin to Death Wish 3 than either of the aforementioned films.

Continue reading: Spanish Judges Review

Full Metal Jacket Review


Extraordinary
The best movie ever made about the American experience in Vietnam happens to have been filmed by an American expatriate living in Britain. Stanley Kubrick's war masterpiece is split into two parts, and it's the first that is laser-engraved into the psyche of any film fan. R. Lee Ermey has never (and will never) be able to shake the role of the uber-demanding sergeant, and Matthew Modine and Vincent D'Onofrio turn in career-making performances as well. Written tautly to the point where it's impossible to look away, this harrowing look at the war -- and what the experience was like for the troops before they ever set foot on foreign soil -- is unmatched in the genre.

Supernova Review


Weak
When near objects of immense gravity such as black holes, it is said that all things bend. Perhaps it is only fitting that a movie such as Supernova, which poses as sci-fi / mystery / horror and that takes place near an object of large gravity, should have the plot twists bent. Common sense tells us that if you bend something that is already bent it will either become more bent or straighten out. Supernova's plot twists straight out, and the result is something completely by the books.

Supernova is the story about a rescue vessel sent into deep space to pick someone up from a rogue moon. To make a short story shorter, they find both the person (who is, of course, accompanied with creepy music) and an alien artifact capable of creating new matter. Every person who touches the stuff becomes endowed with superhuman strength.

Continue reading: Supernova Review

Chelsea Walls Review


Good
New York living is all about location. And where you live is often a sign of your lifestyle. If you live in Brooklyn, it is assumed you are more artistically inclined then, say, someone living in Queens (though this borough is making a comeback with its cheap rent). But the most notorious creative residence in all of New York has been the Chelsea Hotel, as far back as anyone can remember. Boasting such notable alumni as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, and Bob Dylan, there is still a laidback, comfortably scrappy atmosphere about the place when you walk by.

Ethan Hawke (Training Day) courageously attempts to capture the essence of what makes this landmark so addictive in his directorial debut, Chelsea Walls. A collage of character plotlines that only barely intersect, Chelsea is a unique and respectable experiment in its focus on an inanimate object as its central character. Backed by a score that appropriately feels as if it were written while observing the production, Hawke creates an environment easily accessible to both New Yorkers and the non-initiated.

Continue reading: Chelsea Walls Review

Impostor Review


Very Good
Not long ago, some genius a lot smarter than me decided it might be nice if instead of just one sheep, we could have two. Thus began man's obsession with cloning: an obsession that, for better or worse, has somehow managed to spill over into your local cineplex. Some days I wish they'd never cloned that damn sheep at all.

Impostor is Hollywood's latest cloning experiment. Based on a short story by futurist Philip K. Dick, Impostor takes place in a future far away, when man is at war with an alien race. Spencer Olham (Gary Sinise) is on the front lines of weapons development to combat man's alien threat. But one day, things go horribly wrong and Spencer finds himself accused by the military of being an alien replicant, with an assassin's bomb implanted in his chest. Unable to believe he is anyone other than himself, Spencer escapes to search for the truth.

Continue reading: Impostor Review

Happy Accidents Review


OK

Recovering co-dependent Ruby Weaver has such bad luck with men that she and her girlfriends keep a shoebox of photos called "The Ex Files."

In the beginning of "Happy Accidents," writer-director Brad Anderson ("Next Stop Wonderland," "Session 9") shows us a comical montage of progressively eccentric examples: The Bad Actor, the Artist, the Fetishist, the Frenchman, the Junkie and the Abductee, who thought he'd been kidnapped by aliens.

Ruby (Marisa Tomei in an amusingly harried performance) hopes she's seen the worst of this trend and is, with the help of her intrusive therapist (the wonderfully wry Holland Taylor), beginning to curb her pathological urge to try to fix men that are beyond repair.

Continue reading: Happy Accidents Review

McCarthy Fired From Law + Order


Andrew McCarthy Vincent D'Onofrio Dick Wolf

PRETTY IN PINK star Andrew McCarthy has been fired from the set of hit American drama LAW + ORDER: CRIMINAL INTENT after falling out with show regular Vincent D'Onofrio.

The 1980s movie pin-up was supposed to guest star in two episodes of the show, but series creator Dick Wolf gave him his marching orders when he failed to work amicably with the star.

Continue reading: McCarthy Fired From Law + Order

Vincent D'onofrio

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Vincent D'Onofrio

Date of birth

30th June, 1959

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.93






Vincent D'Onofrio Movies

Death Wish Trailer

Death Wish Trailer

Most people are brought up with a clear idea of right and wrong, but when...

Chips Movie Review

Chips Movie Review

It's clear from the very start that this movie has little to do with the...

Rings Trailer

Rings Trailer

It's been 13 years since the horror cycle of the legend of Samara was apparently...

The Magnificent Seven Movie Review

The Magnificent Seven Movie Review

Director Antoine Fuqua brings his usual fascination with violence to this remake of the iconic...

The Magnificent Seven Trailer

The Magnificent Seven Trailer

After the murder of her husband, a widow and resident of the town of Rose...

Jurassic World Movie Review

Jurassic World Movie Review

With studios afraid of anything new or original, it's not surprising that the dinosaurs are...

Jurassic World - Clips Trailer

Jurassic World - Clips Trailer

When John Hammond first created InGen and prepared Jurassic Park, it was a colossal failure....

Jurassic World - Clip And Trailer

Jurassic World - Clip And Trailer

The park is officially open! Twenty two years after the disastrous attempt to bread dinosaurs...

Broken Horses Trailer

Broken Horses Trailer

On the board between Mexico and the United States, something big is brewing. A war...

Run All Night Movie Review

Run All Night Movie Review

With a script by Brad Ingelsby (Out of the Furnace), this thriller has more substance...

Daredevil - Teaser Trailer

Daredevil - Teaser Trailer

A single accident or act of violence can change more than just a single person,...

Jurassic World - Super Bowl TV Spot Trailer

Jurassic World - Super Bowl TV Spot Trailer

The park is officially open! After several years and multiple (disastrous) attempts, Jurassic Park as...

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