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, - Nia Long out and about on Bedford Drive - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Thursday 14th April 2016

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Nia Long - Disney/ABC Winter TCA Tour at the Langham Huntington Hotel - Arrivals at Langham Hotel - Pasadena, CA, Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 9th January 2016

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Nia Long - 'The Perfect Man' premiere - Arrivals at WGA Theater - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 2nd September 2015

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Nia Long - 2015 Disney Media Distribution International Upfronts - Arrivals at Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th May 2015

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Nia Long - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the 2015 Disney Media Distribution International Upfronts event which was held at The Walt Disney Studios Lot in Burbank, California, United States - Monday 18th May 2015

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'Uncle Buck' Set For TV Remake On ABC, Starring Mike Epps


Mike Epps Nia Long John Hughes

ABC has reportedly picked up a single-camera comedy based on the 1989 movie Uncle Buck, which will star Mike Epps. The show joins a string of new comedies the network announced yesterday, including the return of ‘The Muppets’ and Ken Jeong’s ‘Dr Ken’.

Mike EppsEpps will star as Uncle Buck

According to Deadline, Epps will star as Uncle Buck a ‘fun loving but irresponsible guy’ who goes to stay with his brother and sister-in-law after their nanny quits and he needs a place to live. The series is reportedly being eyed for a midseason run on the network. 

Continue reading: 'Uncle Buck' Set For TV Remake On ABC, Starring Mike Epps

Nia Long - Nia Long showed off her First Lady of Fabulous reusable shopping bag at the Studio City Farmers Market. The Mighty Michelle Obama shopping bag is made from 95% recycled woven polypropylene with reinforced stitching and nylon handles. The First Lady of the United States bag sells for $19.95 through the White House Gifts website. - Studio City, California, United States - Sunday 14th September 2014

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Nia Long - World Premiere of Tyler Perry's 'The Single Moms Club' at ArcLight Hollywood - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 10th March 2014

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Nia Long - 45th NAACP Image Awards at Pasadena Civic Auditorium - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 22nd February 2014

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Nia Long - The 19th Annual Critics' Choice Awards at The Barker Hangar - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 16th January 2014

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Saucy Comedy 'The Single Moms Club' Will Chime With Anyone Who's Had To Go It Alone [Trailer]


Tyler Perry Nia Long Terry Crews

New Tyler Perry comedy The Single Moms club may sound like it's aimed at solely lonely or angry single mothers but this energetic, sweet-natured and heart-warming comedy will make even the most sceptical of viewers chuckle with recognition.

Single Moms Club
Four Single Mothers Come Together To Share Their Troubles In This Sweet & Funny Movie.

The movie centres on a group of single mothers from different backgrounds who are brought together via a troubling incident at the school their children attend, which leads to the creation of a support group that helps all of them overcome personal obstacles and bond over their shared parenting trials.

Continue reading: Saucy Comedy 'The Single Moms Club' Will Chime With Anyone Who's Had To Go It Alone [Trailer]

Nia Long and Daphne Wayans - "The Best Man Holiday" - Los Angeles Premiere At TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 6th November 2013

Nia Long and Daphne Wayans
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Nia Long and Daphne Wayans
Nia Long and Daphne Wayans

Good Hair Review


Good
Chris Rock hosts this exploration into hair issues in the African-American community, talking to celebrities, experts and hairdressers. What's surprising is that this is such a big issue, although the film isn't much more than entertaining fluff.

The question is who decides what hair is good hair? Most of the black magazines show women with long, straight, silky locks, but this isn't the reality for the readers. Or at least not an easily achievable reality, as it involves lots of product, weaves and wigs. A series of award-winning stylists tackle black hairdos for a living, and the issue of black women's hair has a rather huge impact on their men.

Continue reading: Good Hair Review

Are We Done Yet? Review


Weak
In normal movie world, Are We Done Yet? would have been the first movie in this series. First, newlyweds Nick (Ice Cube) and Suzanne (Nia Long) would redo their new home, then Nick would take the bratty kids on a road trip.

Often vilified as one of the worst films ever made, Are We Done Yet? is far better than its pedigree would suggest. Mining the home improvement milieu has been done before, and if you've seen The Money Pit you know exactly what's going to happen here. Nick and co. will move into what looks like a dream house, but it will fall apart before their very eyes. A group of incompetant repairmen and contractors will attempt to save it. Nick will have a lot of drywall fall on his head. And the stress will cause much marital strife. The "original" spin here vs. The Money Pit: Suzanne is pregnant.

Continue reading: Are We Done Yet? Review

Big Momma's House 2 Review


Terrible
Big Momma's House 2 has locked onto the secret formula of all-time. Moderate star + cute kids + inappropriateness divided by hidden crime plot = hit. Admit it, when you saw the trailer for The Pacifier, all you saw was a grenade with its pin freshly pulled. Then, it went on to be a sleeper hit that brought in big bucks, helping to continue what is quickly becoming the excruciating career of Vin Diesel. So, there's no surprise that Big Momma's House 2 skyrocketed to the head of the box office this week. If there's a more consistent way to tell how bad a movie is than it being #1 at the box office, I don't know it.

Martin Lawrence returns as Agent Malcolm Turner, the FBI agent who donned a fat suit, a wig and a southern accent in the first Big Momma's House. He's taken a desk job to spend more time with and protect his pregnant wife (Nia Long) and his stepson. But when his mentor gets shot doing undercover work, he's back on the job as Big Momma. He takes a job as a nanny to an uptight, white family whose father might be involved with what got his mentor shot. Between dealing with a young son who jumps off high places, a middle daughter who can't dance, and a 15 year old horn-dog daughter (Kat Dennings), Malcolm also finds time to unearth a hacker plot to open the codes to the CIA and the FBI (gasp!) while loosening up the OCD mother (Emily Procter). Well, if you don't know where this is going, you've been watching better films than I have.

Continue reading: Big Momma's House 2 Review

Boyz N The Hood Review


Excellent
Boyz n the Hood is a movie so fraught with cultural significance that it's hard to remember if it's any good. Upon its release, it was immediately hailed for its startling depiction of gang violence in South Central L.A. But then, in a sort of nightmarish Purple Rose of Cairo twist, the violence jumped from the screen to the audience. All around the country, at scores of theaters showing Boyz, acts of violence--shootings, stabbings, brawls--heaped gasoline on the already burning controversy surrounding the cultural influence of gangsta rap and its glorification of the gangsta lifestyle. Less than a year after Boyz' release, racial tensions boiled over and rioting swept through the very neighborhoods where the film's action is set. And while it would be absurd to claim that Boyz had anything to do with the start of the unrest, the riots made it clear that the rage and frustration depicted in the film was eerily on the money. So, more than a decade later, in a completely different racial climate, with gangsta rap now as mainstream as mac-and-cheese, does Boyz n the Hood still play? Yeah, in a very raw way, it does.

Writer-director John Singleton was only 23 when Boyz hit the big screen in 1991, and if the intervening years have brought anything into sharper focus, it's his immaturity as a writer. Boyz is a sledgehammer of a film -- powerful, but hardly subtle. Singleton centers his story on the character of Tré Styles, who's about 11 in the opening sequence. After Tré gets into a fight at school, he's taken to live with his father, Furious (Laurence Fishburne), who has a better shot at teaching him how to be a man than his mother (Angela Bassett) does. Tré's best friends are Doughboy -- a tough, pudgy, troublemaking little kid -- and Ricky -- Doughboy's good-looking, athletic younger brother. As the sequence winds to a close, Furious' paternal influence keeps Tré out of trouble while the fatherless Doughboy ends up being arrested for shoplifting.

Continue reading: Boyz N The Hood Review

Are We There Yet? Review


Terrible
Watching Ice Cube in Are We There Yet?, I developed a new admiration for him. He's disarming and affable, and has a mischievous smile that let's us know he's having fun the whole time. But try as he may, Cube can't save this movie, in which he also served as a producer. That would be like emptying a flood area by using thimbles.

The awfulness of this movie is boundless. The scatological humor in the movie is already legendary, offering the big three: farting, peeing, and puking. The underage heroes are so reprehensible, I was nearly overcome with joy when they discovered their beloved father with another woman. Cube's character seeks counsel from a talking Satchel Paige bobble head, which is, well... adjectives fail me.

Continue reading: Are We There Yet? Review

Big Momma's House Review


Weak
Oh, to have been a fly on the wall when Big Momma's House was cooked up.... Dress funnyman Martin Lawrence up as a 350-pound Georgia grandmother, spin him around, and let him do his thang. Beat Eddie Murphy at his own game (Nutty Professor II hits theaters later this year), shoot it for cheap with no other real stars, and grab some good grosses.

Sure enough, Big Momma's House is a comic crowd-pleaser that should score well with audiences that refuse to tire of incessant fat jokes, slapstick, and, well, more fat jokes.

Continue reading: Big Momma's House Review

Alfie Review


Weak
With his insatiable appetite for the opposite sex, his cockney British chirp and his healthy confidence in his own good looks, Jude Law's modern-day Romeo romping through Alfie is a smoother-talking Austin Powers without the adolescent giggles.

How much is too much when it comes to Law? Before the female readers answer, consider this: The handsome Brit has his well-manicured hands in three current projects and will release three more films between now and year's end. Needless to say, your tolerance for Law's antics will determine how much you'll enjoy Alfie. Director Charles Shyer's mixed bag of tricks includes a continuous conversation through the imaginary fourth wall and a camera lens that's terrified to let Law wander too far out of frame.

Continue reading: Alfie Review

The Broken Hearts Club Review


Very Good
The sad-sack group of gay men have already become a budding Hollywood cliché, but The Broken Hearts Club manages to rise above its otherwise menial trappings to be a better-than-average comedy that's still unabashedly about "being gay," while still carrying broad appeal for everyone.

With a cast largely composed of non-gay men, you'd be surprised how convincing the likes of Timothy Olyphant and Dean Cain are at playing it fey. Olyphant stars as a likeable photographer/waiter looking to focus his life away from destructive one-night relationships and into something more meaningful. His roommate (Cain) is no help, a pretty boy actor who lands anyone he wants in the sack. Coupled with a half-dozen other characters, the fellows hang out at a restaurant & bar called Jack's Broken Heart (run by none other than a hilarious John Mahoney, who spends Saturday nights crooning in an ill-advised drag costume and the weekends managing the worst softball team in West Hollywood).

Continue reading: The Broken Hearts Club Review

The Best Man (1999) Review


Very Good
The best text for a film to toy with the "emotional heartstrings" of an audience is undoubtedly the romantic comedy. Broad in its appeal, the filmmaker doesn't have to worry about turning away certain audiences with horror, overblown special effects, or too much action. Romantic comedies are so successful because they parody our fascination with love and all its complexities. They are like rolling along a roller coaster of emotion, poking fun at our society's mores, twisting and turning towards a morally fulfilling conclusion. It's a Catch-22 -- despite the fact that we know what's going to happen in the end, we keep coming back for more, and are continuously intrigued time and again by the molding of a blissful resolution.

The Best Man, directed and written by Malcom Lee, is a prime example of an exhilarating love story that will certainly charm its audience. Well written and fabulously acted, this film hopefully will put some fresh new faces onto the Hollywood scene.

Continue reading: The Best Man (1999) Review

Stigmata Review


Good
Visually stimulating films are generally the easiest to critique. The reason for this phenomenon is that most filmmakers tend to concentrate primarily upon action, cinematography, or special effects and all too often lose focus on plot, which is a key element in the success of a film. This has happened so frequently in past years that I can now determine within the first ten minutes whether a movie will disappear into that vast black hole of forgettable lackluster science-fiction/horror films of the nineties or have some potential for long-term success.

The upside to this way of thinking is that when you get a film that combines great visuals with a decent plot then you can have an extremely entertaining product along the lines of an Event Horizon or The Matrix. Luckily for us, Stigmata, directed by Rupert Wainwright (The Sadness of Sex, Blank Check) is one of those films that successfully molds story line with powerful visuals to make for an entertaining and eerie adventure. It's like watching a two-hour music video on MTV. An exciting fusion of neo-punk culture combined with ancient religious rites.

Continue reading: Stigmata Review

Boiler Room Review


Good
America is the land of opportunity, and now more than ever, the opportunity that most Americans are preoccupied with is that of easy money. Our news media is saturated with stories of the instant millionaire, 25-year-old startup CEOs worth nine figures or the crafty investor that bought that startup on IPO and doesn't have to worry too much about his day job anymore either. There are a number of powerful cautionary tales waiting to be drawn from this unwholesome frenzy. Boiler Room tries to tell one of these stories, but sadly it fails to add much to the greed genre established by its two heavily referenced predecessors: Wall Street (1987) and Glengarry Glen Ross (1992).

Boiler Room is the story of Seth (Ribisi), a 19-year-old college dropout obsessed with the American dream of easy money. After concluding rather quickly that college isn't necessarily the fast track to a quick buck, he opens up an underground casino out of his house in Queens, providing a popular service for the local city college kids. After his disapproving father (Rifkin) finds out about the casino, Seth, feeling a repressed need to gain his father's approval, looks into an opportunity to become a stockbroker at the small firm of J.T. Marlin.

Continue reading: Boiler Room Review

Baadasssss! Review


Good

"Baadassss!" is Mario Van Peebles' fond commemoration of his cantankerous father's bull-headed cinematic audacity. An unblinking, if slightly golden-toned, account of the making of Melvin Van Peebles' violent, dark, gritty and groundbreaking "Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song," it's a clear labor of love, and so much the better for it.

"Sweetback" -- a "ghetto Western" about a slick, taciturn pimp who becomes a hunted man for killing a couple thug cops who beat a black militant -- scared the hell out of Hollywood, yet its success ($15 million in limited release in 1971) gave rise to scores of shallower imitators that became the blaxploitation genre of "Coffy" and "Shaft."

Getting the divisive, patently anti-establishment film made was a nightmare of financing and bounced checks ("Baadasssss!" implies that drug money was to be used before Bill Cosby stepped in), of casting (writer-director Melvin played the lead when he couldn't find the right actor), of union problems (the industry guilds were practically all-white at the time -- and expensive), of controversy (an X rating), and of distribution (only two privately-owned theaters would touch it at first).

Continue reading: Baadasssss! Review

Held Up Review


Bad

Stranded at a desert convenience store by his angry girlfriend (Nia Long) who has just discovered he spent their nest egg on a vintage Studebaker, Jamie Foxx is in the wrong place at the wrong time in "Held Up," becoming the most loud-mouthed of a handful of comically diverse hostages when a clumsy virgin hold-up man bungles a robbery at the store.

In its first 10 minutes -- when the movie still looks like it might be about Foxx trying to get his girlfriend back -- the movie shows a pinch of promise. Foxx and Long are both entertaining actors that could carry off a capricious black Bickersons comedy in their sleep.

But any semblance of structure or potential for good laughs exits the movie with Long in the first reel and the balance is spent on shopworn random sketch comedy episodes that the players seem to be making up on the spot while giving each other "just play along!" sideways glances.

Continue reading: Held Up Review

The Best Man Review


OK

An ensemble reunion comedy revolving around an approaching wedding, "The Best Man" is a slightly klutzy charmer about friendship and sex-related secrets within a group of former college buddies.

The lethally handsome Taye Diggs stars in the title role, as a soon-to-be-published author whose new novel contains a barely-disguised passage about a clandestine liaison between himself and a character in his story that rather closely resembles the bride.

The plot: Keep the advanced copy of the book -- entitled "Unfinished Business" and now making its way around the clique gathering for the wedding -- from falling into the groom's hands until after his nuptials, because when he reads what's in there he might change his mind.

Continue reading: The Best Man Review

The Broken Hearts Club Review


OK

For a gay movie that purports to be about real people -- as opposed to melodramatic stereotypes or comedy caricatures -- "The Broken Hearts Club" comes across pretty contrived.

Not only do the ensemble players include such stock West Hollywood denizens as the bimbo hunk and the queeny cry baby with a jones for redecorating, but these clichés are also introduced immediately following a coffee shop gripe session scene about how gays in the movies are always sex maniacs, confidants to lovelorn women, AIDS victims or friends of AIDS victims.

Writer-director Greg Berlanti (a producer on "Dawson's Creek") doesn't seem to realize he's contributing to this very problem. And he's far too green a filmmaker to be passing judgment anyway. This is his first film and it's riddled with nagging script deficiencies (most of these "real people" don't seem to have jobs) and bad technical calls, like the gratuitous, intrusive and annoying overuse of hand-held cameras.

Continue reading: The Broken Hearts Club Review

Stigmata Review


Bad

A goth-lite rehashing of "The Exorcist" -- by way of "The Crow," with a pinch of Madonna's "Like A Prayer" video tossed in for flavor -- "Stigmata" has terminal case of style over substance.

From the movie's very first frame, the story -- about a generically funky Pittsburgh hairdresser (Patricia Arquette) who becomes possessed and inflicted with the wounds of Christ -- takes a back seat to moody, underexposed photography, a never-ending rainstorm allusion and rave-spastic editing set to a soundtrack by Billy Corgan of The Smashing Pumpkins and Elia Cmiral ("Ronin").

Arquette plays Frankie Paige, a non-believer who starts channeling a dead priest after being given his stolen rosary as a gift. When she begins exhibiting signs of stigmata, an ordained investigator (Gabriel Byrne) --with faith issues of his own, natch -- is sent to debunk her case by a crooked, cover-up-happy Vatican cardinal with delusions of grandeur (Jonathan Pryce). But Byrne becomes a believer and tries to protect the girl from his superiors.

Continue reading: Stigmata Review

Are We There Yet? Review


Weak

Much better than Meet the Fockers," this family-friendly film uses virtually the same batch of vomit jokes, pee jokes, slapstick, chases and exploding cars. But this time we have Ice Cube, who possesses a remarkable screen presence and star power, plus an ability to effortlessly switch from cuddly comedy to fearsome drama. Cube flows with the material instead of against it, immersing himself in it, no matter how embarrassed he might be.

He plays Nick Persons, a sports collectibles dealer who volunteers to bring two kids from Oregon to Vancouver to impress a girl, the children's mother (Nia Long). The flimsy plot arranges vague excuses to avoid planes and trains and get the trio into an automobile, so that the rebellious children can wreck Nick's fancy new ride. None of the film's major events are very funny or interesting, but Cube manages a few delightfully funny and charming small moments in-between the big plot turns.

Tracy Morgan provides the voice for a Satchel Paige bobblehead that advises Nick from time to time. Jay Mohr co-stars, and Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura from "Star Trek") makes a "special appearance."

Continue reading: Are We There Yet? Review

Big Momma's House Review


Bad

There are two jokes in "Big Momma's House," Martin Lawrence's flimsy stab at "Mrs. Doubtfire"-style costume comedy:

1) Lawrence made up in a wig and a fat lady rubber suit.

2) Lawrence made up in a wig and a fat lady rubber suit, staring lustfully at Nia Long's backside and shrieking "Damn!" in a bad falsetto.

Continue reading: Big Momma's House Review

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Nia Long Movies

Keanu Trailer

Keanu Trailer

Rell has just broken up with his partner and he's in a complete self-absorbed world....

Tyler Perry's The Single Mom's Club Trailer

Tyler Perry's The Single Mom's Club Trailer

Feeling underappreciated and frequently undermined, many single mothers have to go through a lot to...

The Best Man Holiday Trailer

The Best Man Holiday Trailer

It's been fifteen years since the release of Harper Stewart's inflammatory autobiographical novel and the...

Good Hair Movie Review

Good Hair Movie Review

Chris Rock hosts this exploration into hair issues in the African-American community, talking to celebrities,...

Are We Done Yet? Trailer

Are We Done Yet? Trailer

Are We Done Yet? is a follow-up to Revolution Studios hilarious 2005 family comedy Are...

Premonition Movie Review

Premonition Movie Review

Forgive me for treading lightly through this Premonition review, but the last time I tried...

Big Momma's House 2 Movie Review

Big Momma's House 2 Movie Review

Big Momma's House 2 has locked onto the secret formula of all-time. Moderate star +...

Baadasssss! Movie Review

Baadasssss! Movie Review

Baadasssss! is a rollicking, high-energy, and monumentally-titled film re-creation of the trials and travails of...

Are We There Yet? Movie Review

Are We There Yet? Movie Review

Watching Ice Cube in Are We There Yet?, I developed a new admiration for him....

Big Momma's House Movie Review

Big Momma's House Movie Review

Oh, to have been a fly on the wall when Big Momma's House was cooked...

Alfie Movie Review

Alfie Movie Review

With his insatiable appetite for the opposite sex, his cockney British chirp and his healthy...

The Broken Hearts Club Movie Review

The Broken Hearts Club Movie Review

The sad-sack group of gay men have already become a budding Hollywood cliché, but The...

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