Ed Solomon

Ed Solomon

Ed Solomon Quick Links

News Film RSS

Now You See Me 2 Review

Good

While the original 2013 magical caper was a big hit, it's style-over-substance approach didn't exactly scream out for a follow-up. But here we are, with go-to sequel man Jon M. Chu at the helm (he also directed the second Step Up and G.I. Joe movies). Most of the high-octane cast is back for more trickery, but the plot is even murkier this time.

Since their last whiz-bang stunt, the Four Horsemen have been laying low. Their leader Dylan (Mark Ruffalo) continues to work in the FBI, helping Daniel, Merrit and Jack (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson and Dave Franco) plot their next caper, now joined by quirky illusionist Lula (Lizzy Caplan). Their latest project is to expose corruption at a New York conglomerate, but the stunt is ambushed, and the quartet mysteriously finds themselves in Macau, coerced by a tech genius (Daniel Radcliffe) into staging an elaborate heist. Meanwhile, Dylan's cover is blown, so he teams up with veteran Thaddeus (Morgan Freeman) and heads to Macau himself, chased by his FBI boss (Sanaa Latham). And it all goes down in London.

The round-the-world plot gives the movie some very cool locations, and the plot races so quickly that most audiences won't notice that it makes virtually no logical sense at all. There are flashy distractions at every turn, from sleight of hand to vanishing acts to gross-out gags to enormous double-bluffs, and all of this is thoroughly entertaining even if the script itself feels strangely incomplete. Most sequences tend to end before they get to the point, while action scenes are choppy and incoherent. The only set-piece that works is the kinetic central heist, which hinges on a rapidly flung playing card. But even though it's uneven and clunky, the film remains entertaining simply because of the magical shenanigans and snarky dialogue.

Continue reading: Now You See Me 2 Review

Now You See Me Review


Good

The idea of magicians conducting a series of heists is a great one, but this under-developed film never quite seizes the opportunity. Even its terrific A-list cast can't make much of the lame plot. And director Leterrier is so enamoured with magic that he packs the film with whizzy digital trickery. Which completely misses the point.

At the centre are four illusionists: card trickster Daniel (Eisenberg), hypnotist Merrit (Harrelson), escapologist Henley (Fisher) and street magician Jack (Franco). They're summoned by a mysterious figure to team up for a series of elaborate performances funded by a wealthy benefactor (Caine). First up is a Las Vegas show that involves stealing millions of euros from a Paris bank and raining them down on the audience. This attracts the attention of FBI Agent Rhodes (Ruffalo) and Interpol's Dray (Laurent), who follow them to their next shows in New Orleans and New York. As does a notorious debunker (Freeman) determined to expose their secrets.

The film never quite gets the balance right, as we're not sure if we should root for these flashy young magicians or the people they're leading on a wild goose chase. But there's plenty of eye candy to keep us happy, as each whizzy stunt goes over-the-top to make us wonder what's really happening here. Everything this quartet does has an anarchist slant, stealing from the wealthy to help the needy, which adds a tinge of topicality. Although the gratuitous action scenes and ludicrous effects leave the film about as realistic as a Road Runner cartoon.

Continue reading: Now You See Me Review

The In-Laws (2003) Review


Excellent
Has Michael Douglas found The Fountain of Youth in Catherine Zeta-Jones? Since the Gordon Gekko days of Wall Street fame, his body is certainly a little less nimble, his face a little more wrinkled, and his hair a shade too light. But the guy looks great, and he's once again an action hero. That bumps him up from "silver spoon" to "ageless wonder" in the Hollywood classification book - ever closer to the royalty of perennial good lookers Redford and Basinger.

In The In-Laws (based on the 1979 film of the same name), like most other Michael Douglas vehicles, his gaunt face is rarely off the camera. Wisely, director Andrew Fleming inserts a hilarious Albert Brooks as the perfect remedy for Douglas's self-absorption.

Continue reading: The In-Laws (2003) Review

Ed Solomon

Ed Solomon Quick Links

News Film RSS

Occupation

Filmmaker


Suggested

Sports Team: 'Bus Trip All-Dayer' live at Dreamland in Margate

Sports Team: 'Bus Trip All-Dayer' live at Dreamland in Margate

Live music returned to Dreamland in Margate in spectacular fashion as Sports Team brought their 'Bus Trip All-Dayer' back to the seaside town for the...

Mercury Prize 2021: With a shortlist like this, it’s truly anybody’s game

Mercury Prize 2021: With a shortlist like this, it’s truly anybody’s game

Wolf Alice are nominated for the third time and Arlo Parks is an unsurprising first-time nominee.

Album Of The Week: The 19th Anniversary of 'I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love' by My Chemical Romance

Album Of The Week: The 19th Anniversary of 'I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love' by My Chemical Romance

Well before they enjoyed meteoric success with 'The Black Parade', My Chemical Romance started their musical journey with another concept album, 'I...

Advertisement
‘Whip My Hair’ Off: How shaving their heads empowered these women in music

‘Whip My Hair’ Off: How shaving their heads empowered these women in music

Willow Smith and more rocked a buzzcut for so many reasons.

Normani - Wild Side ft. Cardi B Video

Normani - Wild Side ft. Cardi B Video

Normani and Cardi B dispense with the need to maintain any resemblance of social distancing as they get up-close and personal in the video their...

Album Of The Week: The 37th Anniversary Of 'Diamond Life' by Sade

Album Of The Week: The 37th Anniversary Of 'Diamond Life' by Sade

'Diamond Life', released on the 16th July 1984, is not only a significant album in it's own right, it's a cultural touchstone and a near perfect...

From Amyl and the Sniffers to The Jacklights: Six upcoming punk albums you must not miss

From Amyl and the Sniffers to The Jacklights: Six upcoming punk albums you must not miss

The resurrection of punk presents an exciting year for music.

Advertisement

Ed Solomon Movies

Now You See Me 2 Movie Review

Now You See Me 2 Movie Review

While the original 2013 magical caper was a big hit, it's style-over-substance approach didn't exactly...

Now You See Me Movie Review

Now You See Me Movie Review

The idea of magicians conducting a series of heists is a great one, but this...

The In-Laws (2003) Movie Review

The In-Laws (2003) Movie Review

Has Michael Douglas found The Fountain of Youth in Catherine Zeta-Jones? Since the Gordon...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews