Fernando Sulichin

Fernando Sulichin

Fernando Sulichin Quick Links

Film RSS

Snowden Review

Excellent

Here's another remarkable biopic from Oliver Stone, who has used all-star casts and intensely pointed filmmaking to trace the lives of such people as JFK, Nixon, Jim Morrison and George W. Bush. And now he turns his attention to whistleblower Edward Snowden. This is an urgent, skilfully made film that manages to avoid preachy politics as it asks the central question: was Snowden a traitor or a patriot?

Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays Ed, a nerdy genius who never went to university but was spotted by CIA trainer Corbin (Rhys Ifans) and brought into the fold. Rising through the ranks, he moves from Virginia to Switzerland, Japan and Hawaii, accompanied by his long-suffering girlfriend Lindsay (Shailene Woodley), who isn't allowed to know what he does for a living. Over the years, his faith in America's government is shaken as he discovers the scale of its data-gathering operation, collecting all telephone and internet information on every person on earth, whether or not they're a suspect. And he believes that the taxpayers have a right to know what their elected officials are doing.

The script tells the story as Ed describes his life to filmmaker Laura Poitras (Melissa Leo) and two Guardian journalists (Zachary Quinto and Tom Wilkinson) while hiding in a Hong Kong hotel, an event recounted in the Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour. Eventually, this element of the story generates some proper action as the CIA tracks him down and gives chase. Stone orchestrates these scenes expertly, generating some real adrenaline without sacrificing the bigger narrative. And Gordon-Levitt is simply remarkable, vanishing into the role so effectively that the final dissolve to the real Snowden is barely perceptible. His chemistry with Woodley is complex and engaging (even with a gratuitous sex scene), creating a terrific central love story to guide the audience through the events.

Continue reading: Snowden Review

Spun Review


OK
Wes Anderson fans will barely recognize Spun protagonist, if you can call him that, Jason Schwartzman. Though he's been in a handful of forgettable roles since claiming cult status with his breakthrough in 1998's Rushmore, he's back to center frame as a speed-addicted, goalless youngster. Though this time around he somehow manages to snag a buxom blonde dancer and tie her to a bed for a few days instead of merely pining away for the older woman.

But with an eclectic cast that includes John Leguizamo, Mena Suvari, and Mickey Rourke, Spun is more about exuberant editing providing a humorous glimpse into a small, bored, drug community than a focus on any particular acting or writing talent. Once the pizzazz of quick cuts and graphic novel touches has washed over the normal tell-tale signs of substance abuse by all the characters, you're left with another drug movie that feels as if it's trying too hard to be Trainspotting, without the spiffy production design.

Continue reading: Spun Review

Bully Review


Excellent
Larry Clark -- who wrote and directed his first film, Kids, at the tender age of 52 and in the process, broke the mold about what we should expect from a movie about teenagers -- returns to familiar ground in Bully, a striking and harrowing follow-up.

A slam-dunk natural subject for Clark, Bully follows the based-on-reality story of Marty Puccio (Brad Renfro), who along with his girlfriend Lisa (Rachel Miner) decides to brutally slay his "best friend" Bobby (Nick Stahl) as payback for a lifetime of abuse. Set in the ultra-trashy nether regions of southern Florida -- and I mean seriously, beyond-WWF trashy -- there's little to do but drive your car, play video games, have sex, and beat the crap out of your friends.

Continue reading: Bully Review

Fernando Sulichin

Fernando Sulichin Quick Links

Film RSS

Occupation

Filmmaker


Suggested

Maximo Park - Nature Always Wins Album Review

Maximo Park - Nature Always Wins Album Review

Maximo Park return with their first full length studio album in nearly four years as they release 'Nature Always Wins'.

Lost Horizons - In Quiet Moments Album Review

Lost Horizons - In Quiet Moments Album Review

Yes, I know, it's far too early to call out contenders for the Top Ten Albums of 2021 but, if 'In Quiet Moments' by Lost Horizons doesn't feature...

Wolf Alice - The Last Man On Earth Video

Wolf Alice - The Last Man On Earth Video

Wolf Alice make a long awaited return ahead of the release of their third album with a new single and video, 'The Last Man On Earth'.

Advertisement
Tom Odell - numb Video

Tom Odell - numb Video

Tom Odell returns with new song, 'numb', his first single in nearly two years.

Bryan Adams - The Forty First Anniversary Of Bryan Adams Self-Titled Debut Album.

Bryan Adams - The Forty First Anniversary Of Bryan Adams Self-Titled Debut Album.

Way, way back in the February of 1980 one twenty year old Bryan Adams released his eponymous debut album, paving the way for the start of his...

Upcoming Releases: The February albums we're sure you're going to fall for

Upcoming Releases: The February albums we're sure you're going to fall for

As the second month of 2021 gets ever nearer we take a look at the new releases that are set to delight our ears over the coming weeks.

Advertisement

Fernando Sulichin Movies

Snowden Movie Review

Snowden Movie Review

Here's another remarkable biopic from Oliver Stone, who has used all-star casts and intensely pointed...

Spun Movie Review

Spun Movie Review

Wes Anderson fans will barely recognize Spun protagonist, if you can call him that, Jason...

Bully Movie Review

Bully Movie Review

Larry Clark -- who wrote and directed his first film, Kids, at the tender age...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews