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The Pink Panther Strikes Again Review


Very Good
More absurdity in this fourth Sellers-as-Clouseau flick, arguably the most ridiculous in the series as his former boss (Herbert Lom) has been finally driven insane, so much so that he orders a hitman to off the bumbling inspector. And not just one hitman, 20 of them -- including Omar Sharif in a cameo -- anything to be rid of the menace of Clouseau. There's also a doomsday machine/end of the world ransom plot (later re-spoofed in the Austin Powers series), but this is of course all just the backdrop for Sellers to do his thing.

A Shot In The Dark Review


Extraordinary
The second film in the Pink Panther series doesn't mention its heritage in the title (and in fact there's no relation to the titular jewel at all in the movie), but A Shot in the Dark is widely -- and wisely -- thought to be the best film in the series of five. Peter Sellers is back as the incompetent Clouseau, this time investigating a murder at a wealthy Frenchman's (George Sanders) estate, where all signs point to the maid (Elke Sommer) as the guilty party. Clouseau refuses to see it this way, with wildly funny, slapstick, and simply crazy results. Sellers is on full tilt in this one.

The Party Review


Good
Peter Sellers makes one of his biggest character stretches here as Indian nincompoop Hrundi V. Bakshi, a film extra who accidentally demolishes the set, then finds himself mistakenly invited to a big Hollywood dinner party. His bumbling begins the moment he steps foot in the door. Literally: He loses his shoe in a fountain, doesn't have a seat at the table, and dunks a piece of artwork in the toilet. Little bizarrely hilarious moments don't quite make the movie on their own, but for Sellers and/or Blake Edwards fans, it's totally worth a look.

Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb Review


Essential
Only Stanley Kubrick could make a movie about World War III and make it one of the most hilarious films ever made. No, it doesn't hurt to have Peter Sellers in your film, either. And it doesn't hurt to have him in three roles (originally he was slated to play four, but a broken leg and trouble with Slim Pickens's southern accent kept him out of the B-52 that just might bring about Armageddon).

Ranking as filmcritic.com's #1 movie of all time in our recent Top 100 Films of the Millennium feature, I suppose we have some explaining to do as to why we picked it. Not only is the movie wickedly funny, it's a subversive anti-war film that shows just how easily a conflict could erupt and the end of the world be brought about. The cast is top notch, and Sellers would have stolen the show if George C. Scott, Pickens, and Sterling Hayden didn't keep taking it back. Never for five seconds is this film less than perfect -- from its devilish gags (courtesy of co-writer Terry Southern) to its hilarious improvisations (courtesy, of course, of Sellers) to its simply unpredictable plot. I've seen this movie two dozen times and each with each viewing not only do I get something more from it, but I keep thinking the ending is going to change.

Continue reading: Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb Review

Revenge Of The Pink Panther Review


Good
Peter Sellers' fifth and final performance as Clouseau, of Pink Panther fame, finds the bumbling detective the target of a French crime lord determined to boost him image by offing the notoriously hard-to-kill inspector. It's the most cartoon-like of the series (when Clouseau falls through a hole in the floor -- cut out in a circle beneath where he stands, natch -- his hat stays suspended in air on the story above), and the least memorable by a longshot. Never mind that it doesn't make a lot of sense to start with (no explanation is made for the reappearance of former inspector Dreyfus (Herbert Lom), who disintegrated himself at the end of Panther #4), and the remainder of the movie is mainly one setup for Sellers to ham it up after another. Still, what a ham, eh?

Alice In Wonderland (1966) Review


OK
It doesn't take the Ravi Shankar soundtrack to cue you that this version of Alice in Wonderland -- just an hour long, shot for the BBC -- hails from the 1960s. Taking the story's thinly veiled drug metaphors to their ultra-serious limit, the movie has a bit of a Cheech and Chong feeling to it, and the star power of John Gielgud, Peter Sellers, and Peter Cook (among many others) conspire to ensure that Alice (Anne-Marie Mallik) doesn't even got top billing. This was one of the first of director Jonathan Miller's numerous BBC teleplays, and his greenness is apparent -- it's neither kid-friendly (the actors don't wear animal costumes, they just allude to them) nor particularly clever, coming across in the end like a kind of Alice's Greatest Hits. Finally, I know it was 1966 television, but Alice just never works in black and white. It's like The Wizard of Oz without the yellow brick road.

The Pink Panther Review


Very Good
Not the best film in the Pink Panther collection, this introduction to Peter Sellers' bumbling Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) is still a must-see. In this film, Clouseau is in a lush ski resort and vaguely on the trail of a jewel thief who's out to steal this "Pink Panther" from a vacationing princess (the ridiculously sexy Claudia Cardinale). David Niven and Robert Wagner make somewhat less of an impression -- and I'll try not to spoil anything by mentioning how their roles interact here -- but on the whole Panther is good and messy fun.

The Return Of The Pink Panther Review


Very Good
Sellers starred as Clouseau for the third time in this Pink Panther flick, a funny (though somewhat less so than its predecessors) entry into the Blake Edwards empire. The Pink Panther diamond is stolen again, and the bumbling Sellers is thrown back in action to hunt doiwn the thief. Inspired largely by To Catch a Thief, it's all very familiar from the first two films -- right down to the fights with Cato (he springs from a freezer where he's been hiding), but Edwards proves he still has an excellent handle on the genre.

The Ladykillers (1955) Review


Good
As black comedies go, The Ladykillers (remade in 2004) is neither terribly black nor terribly comedic. The centerpiece performance by a sunken-eyed Alec Guinness doesn't ever raise the film above its simple beginnings, involving a band of crooks (led by Guinness) who use an old woman's home as home base for a heist. The crooks scheme to kill the old lady when she stumbles upon their plan. Slow and unbalanced, the movie doesn't make much of an impression, though some moments (like the crooks posing as a string quartet) are priceless.

Continue reading: The Ladykillers (1955) Review

Casino Royale Review


OK
Though great he may be, there is a limit to the amount of uninterrupted Burt Bacharach music one can endure. And sadly, that limit -- of music punctuated by kazoos, harpischords, and accordions -- is far less than 137 minutes.

There's also a limit on the length of a spy spoof one can sit through (the second Austin Powers and Richard Grieco's If Looks Could Kill being the few notable, yet guilty, exceptions). That limit tends to run about 58 minutes.

Continue reading: Casino Royale Review

The Magic Christian Review


Very Good
The video cover of The Magic Christian features Ringo Starr sitting on Peter Sellers' lap. Starr has on his usual shit-eating grin, and Sellers' expression can only be described as one of sheer horror.

Sellers may very well have had no idea what he was getting into with this movie, an adaptation of the cult novel by the same name from author Terry Southern. The film concerns Sellers' business magnate Guy Grand, who adopts a homeless man (Starr) and presents him to the board as his son.

Continue reading: The Magic Christian Review

Peter Sellers

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Peter Sellers

Date of birth

8th September, 1925

Date of death

24th July, 1980

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.73


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Peter Sellers Movies

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Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb Movie Review

Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb Movie Review

Only Stanley Kubrick could make a movie about World War III and make it one...

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