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Alan Rickman Leaves £4 Million To His Wife, And £100000 To Charities


Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman’s will has been revealed just over four months after he sadly passed away from pancreatic cancer – and it includes a number of charitable donations totalling £100,000.

The famous stage, TV and film actor, famous for playing Severus Snape in the Harry Potter movies and also portraying the notorious Hans Gruber in Die Hard and the Sheriff of Nottingham in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, died in January at the age of 69. Now, his will governing the distribution of his UK assets has been revealed.

Alan RickmanAlan Rickman left four legacies to various charities, totalling £100,000

Continue reading: Alan Rickman Leaves £4 Million To His Wife, And £100000 To Charities

Eye In The Sky Review

Excellent

Almost forensic in its approach, this smart thriller explores a drone strike from a variety of perspectives that bring the moral dilemmas sharply into focus. This includes textured performances from seriously gifted actors who add layers of political, military, legal and emotional meaning to each moment along the way. So the film is continuously gripping, putting the audience right in the middle of the action.

The target is in a suburb of Nairobi, where three of the world's most wanted Somali jihadists are gathering to prepare two young suicide bombers for a mission. British Colonel Powell (Helen Mirren) is overseeing the operation from London, with her American drone pilots (Aaron Paul and Phoebe Fox) working in Las Vegas. The hitch is that two of the targets are UK citizens, and one is American, which means that they also need to have government officials in on the discussion. So Lt General Benson (Alan Rickman) is watching with British government ministers (including Jeremy Northam and Monica Dolan). Meanwhile in Kenya, a local operative (Barkhad Abdi) is on the scene. But just as everyone agrees to fire the missile, a young girl (Aisha Takow) wanders into the danger zone.

What follows is a remarkably tense escalation of decision-making, as everyone passes the buck up the chain to avoid making the call themselves. Guy Hibbert's script orchestrates this skilfully, keeping the atmosphere taut while stirring generous doses of black comedy into the interaction between soldiers and politicians. This includes amusing scenes in which Britain's foreign secretary (Iain Glen) is dragged into the conversation while suffering food poisoning in Singapore. Yes, the film has a terrific sense of instant global connections, as its characters work together at a huge distance from each other and from the target of their operation.

Continue reading: Eye In The Sky Review

Alan Rickman's Death Ended 'Galaxy Quest 2' Plans


Alan Rickman Sam Rockwell

We are both gutted and relieved to learn that plans to start production on 'Galaxy Quest 2' were cancelled this year in light of the death of Alan Rickman. It's a shame that the world is as yet being denied a sequel to one of the greatest sci-fi comedies on record, but it's definitely for the best.

Galaxy QuestGalaxy Quest was a cult hit upon its 1999 release

The 1999 cult film was never exactly a blockbuster, but it still has a devoted fanbase. That's why many will react with utter disappointment at news that a sequel to 'Galaxy Quest' was going to  shoot this year for Amazon, but the deal was never signed off when Alan Rickman died.

Continue reading: Alan Rickman's Death Ended 'Galaxy Quest 2' Plans

Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass Trailer


As Alice is once again taken into the magical and mysterious world that she's somehow connected to, Alice finds herself with her friends on the other side of the looking glass. Through Alice doesn't really know why, she's attached to the peculiar world and its inhabitants but her latest visit will put the young girl in grave danger. 

The Red Queen has gained a dangerous new ally who is out to find the young blonde haired girl. As the clock ticks and tocks, the game of kings becomes a whole new reality and Alice must find a way to beat her opponents. 

Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass is based on the characters from Lewis Carroll's novel and is produced by Tim Burton. The Muppets director James Bobin directs the feature film.  

Kate Winslet Lightens Emotional Alan Rickman Tribute With Hilarious Story


Kate Winslet Alan Rickman

Kate Winslet remains one of the most down-to-earth British actresses ever, and proved as much in her hilarious tribute to friend and colleague Alan Rickman at the London Film Critics' Circle Awards, where she landed the best supporting actress prize for her role in 'Steve Jobs'.

Kate Winslet and Alan RickmanKate Winslet and Alan Rickman worked together more than once

The actress seemed especially emotional when she went to collect her award, first asking the audience to stand and applaud in honour of Rickman, with whom she starred on 2014's 'A Little Chaos' which he also directed. She first worked with him, however, on 1995's 'Sense and Sensibility' where she played Marianne Dashwood.

Continue reading: Kate Winslet Lightens Emotional Alan Rickman Tribute With Hilarious Story

JK Rowling Reveals The Secret She Told Alan Rickman To Help Him Better Understand Snape


Alan Rickman Jk Rowling

Jk Rowling has revealed part of what she told actor Alan Rickman about the character of Severus Snape, which helped him better understand his Harry Potter role. Rickman, who passed away last week aged 69, played Snape in all eight of the Harry Potter movies, ending with 2011’s Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2.

Alan RickmanJK Rowling has spoken about the ‘little piece of information’ she revealed to Alan Rickman about Severus Snape.

In a 2011 interview, Rickman said that he had a phone conversation with Rowling before taking the role, which helped him better understand Snape’s character and intentions. “Certainly, I did say I needed to talk to (Rowling) before I could get a handle on how to play it, and we did have a phone conversation,” Rickman said.

Continue reading: JK Rowling Reveals The Secret She Told Alan Rickman To Help Him Better Understand Snape

Emma Watson Accused By Twitter Trolls Of "Exploiting" Alan Rickman's Death To Push Feminist Agenda


Emma Watson Alan Rickman Harry Potter

Emma Watson has been accused by Twitter trolls of exploiting the death of her Harry Potter co-star Alan Rickman to push her own ‘feminist agenda’.

The British actress, who played Hermione Granger in all eight of the Harry Potter movies between 2001 and 2011, tweeted a quotation from Rickman yesterday after the news broke of his death at the age of 69 from cancer. It read: “There is nothing wrong with a man being a feminist - I think it is to our mutual advantage.”

Emma WatsonEmma Watson has been accused of exploiting Alan Rickman's death to push a feminist agenda

Continue reading: Emma Watson Accused By Twitter Trolls Of "Exploiting" Alan Rickman's Death To Push Feminist Agenda

See Alan Rickman In His Final Live Action Role 'Eye In The Sky' - Trailer + Pictures


Alan Rickman Helen Mirren

It's a sad day for the world of film as we lose yet another giant of the entertainment industry, but at least we get to see Alan Rickman in one last live action role with the Spring release of modern war thriller 'Eye In The Sky'.

Helen Mirren in Eye In The SkyHelen Mirren co-stars with Alan Rickman in Eye In The Sky

It follows a UK-based military intelligence official, Colonel Katherine Powell (Helen Mirren), in her mission to capture a group of wanted terrorists in Kenya. With their own advanced drone technology, she and Lieutenant General Frank Benson (Rickman)- led by American drone pilot Steve Watts ('Breaking Bad' star Aaron Paul), are able to spy on their base only to discover that their mission has taken an unfortunate turn of events.

Continue reading: See Alan Rickman In His Final Live Action Role 'Eye In The Sky' - Trailer + Pictures

More New Year Tragedy: Alan Rickman Has Passed Away Aged 69


Alan Rickman

The New Year has certainly not got off to the best of starts and it is with deep regret that we have to announce the death of another legend of the entertainment industry. Alan Rickman, best known for playing Professor Snape in the 'Harry Potter' films, has passed away at the age of 69.

Alan RickmanAlan Rickman dies aged 69

His death will come as a shock to fans, but for his family it was not so unexpected. The actor had been suffering from cancer, and they confirmed that he left this world in his London home with family and friends surrounding him. It was only on Monday (January 11th 2016) that we revealed the death of music legend David Bowie - also of cancer - so it's a pretty morose week for celebrity news.

Continue reading: More New Year Tragedy: Alan Rickman Has Passed Away Aged 69

Eye In The Sky Trailer


Drones are now one of the most effective weapons the military have when fighting in battle. Their surveillance abilities are incredibly high quality and make it much easier to find and target individuals who are wanted.

Colonel Katherine Powell has been given a mission to go and find and capture an ex-British citizen who's become an extremist and is meeting with some of the men on the most wanted list. Having been previously connected to a series of suicide bombings, the Colonel tracks down the woman (currently going under the new Ayesha Al-Hady) and makes contact with her superiors to let them know her progress.

Using a multitude of surveillance equipment, Powell soon becomes privy to the terrorists next plans, she discovers that the bombers are planning another imminent attack. Placed in an impossible situation, Powell and her bosses must decide how to complete the mission without the loss of civilian life.

Alan Rickman Gets Behind The Director's Chair In A Little Chaos


Kate Winslet Alan Rickman

British favourites Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman have reunited for Rickman’s first film as a director in more than a decade: A Little Chaos. The upcoming romantic drama, which Rickman has also written, is centred round Winslet’s widow Madame Sabine De Barra, a landscape architect who is recruited to design the gardens of King Louis XIV.

A Little Chaos
Kate Winslet stars as a landscape gardener challening sexual protocols

Rickman plays the French monarch and Matthias Schoenaerts plays master landscaper Andre and Winslet’s love interest within the gardens of Versailles.

Continue reading: Alan Rickman Gets Behind The Director's Chair In A Little Chaos

A Little Chaos Trailer


In the palace of Versailles, a tremendous garden is maintained. One day, the builder and head gardener sees an ordinary woman arriving at the palace, and, throwing aside ideas of conformity, chooses to rearrange some of the garden into something that pleases her. He takes her on with the hopes of updating and adding some life to the traditional gardens, and steadily begins to fall for her. As she finds difficulty integrating into the high society that he is from, he ensures her that, in fact, she is envied by the upper classes for her newness. But when that envy turns into something more, the gardener will have to fight tooth and nail to maintain the garden, their love, and their lives.

Continue: A Little Chaos Trailer

BFI London Film Festival - 'A Little Chaos' - Love Gala screening at the Odeon West End

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

LFF: A Little Chaos - Love gala screening held at the Odeon West End.

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman - Stars took to the red carpet for the premiere of RomCom 'A Little Chaos' at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival - Toronto, Canada - Sunday 14th September 2014

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman
Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman - Toronto International Film Festival - 'A Little Chaos' - Premiere - Toronto, Ontario, Canada - Saturday 13th September 2014

Alan Rickman
Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman - The Portrait Gala 2014: Collecting to Inspire - fundraiser held at the National Portrait Gallery - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman and Ralph Fiennes - The U.K. premiere party for 'The Invisible Woman' held at the Westbury Hotel - Inside - London, United Kingdom - Monday 27th January 2014

Michael Gambon and Alan Rickman - Roger Lloyd-Pack as Barty Crouch, Michael Gambon as Professor Albus Dumbledore and Alan Rickman as Professor Severus Snape in 'Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire' directed by Mike Newell (2005) - Thursday 16th January 2014

Michael Gambon and Alan Rickman

Juliet Stevenson and Alan Rickman - Celebrities supporting the DEC Philippines Typhoon Appeal during a telethon at BT Tower. - London, United Kingdom - Monday 18th November 2013

Juliet Stevenson and Alan Rickman
Juliet Stevenson and Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman - CBGB Music and Film Festival Opening Night Presents the New York Premiere of "CBGB" - New York, NY, United States - Tuesday 8th October 2013

A Week In Movies: Gravity Bows In Venice, One Direction Takes To Cinemas, All-star Film Explores JFK's Death


George Clooney Sandra Bullock Alfonso Cuaron One Direction Niall Horan Amber Heard Anson Mount Alan Rickman Hilly Kristal Rupert Grint Malin Akerman Ashley Greene Mickey Sumner

Gravity premiere in Venice

George Clooney and Sandra Bullock brought their star power to opening night at the 70th Venice Film Festival on Wednesday. The event launched with the world premiere of Alfonso Cuaron's Gravity, and the critical buzz has been big for the thriller about two astronauts stranded in space when their shuttle mission is hit by debris. Take a look at photos of Clooney and Bullock attending The 70th Venice Film Festival here.

The big movie in cinemas around the world this week is the documentary One Direction: This Is Us, which has taken a hammering from critics for being far too on-message. But it's likely to keep fans very happy, especially since it reveals things like the fact that Niall Horan strips down to his underpants when he records in the studio. A scene in the film shows him recording this summer's big hit Best Song Ever in his boxers. Find out why Niall says "I sing better naked" here.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Gravity Bows In Venice, One Direction Takes To Cinemas, All-star Film Explores JFK's Death

'The Butler' Gives Competitors The Brush-Off In First Weekend Success


Forest Whitaker Lee Daniels Oprah Winfrey Alan Rickman Jane Fonda John Cusack Robin Williams

The Butler has outperformed all of its rivals upon its first weekend, having been released on 16th August to much nodding from critics and $25 million (£15.9m) earned. The film showcases an all-star cast, who portray a period of dramatic social upheaval in America, set around the life of the not-entirely-fictional butler, Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker).

The Butler Whitehouse
A Shot From The Movie Showing The Kennedys Meeting The Whitehouse's Staff.

Gaines serves as a butler in the White House for 34 years and eight presidents and uses his unique position to witness important presidential discussions of national civil rights issues as the historical events play out. The movie charts such landmark events as Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination, the Vietnam war, the Nixon resignation, Obama's presidential campaign and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Gaines' character is based upon the life of Eugene Allen who worked in the White House from 1952 to 1986.

Continue reading: 'The Butler' Gives Competitors The Brush-Off In First Weekend Success

'Lee Daniels' The Butler' Beats 'Kick-Ass 2' And 'Jobs' In US Weekend Box Office


Oprah Winfrey Forest Whitaker Terrence Howard Cuba Gooding Junior Alan Rickman John Cusack James Marsden Chloe Moretz Aaron Johnson Christopher Mintz-Plasse Minka Kelly Robin Williams Jane Fonda Mariah Carey Lee Daniels

Lee Daniels' The Butler has defeated other newcomers Kick-Ass 2 and Jobs in the US Weekend Box Office. The Butler has headed straight to number one whilst Kick-Ass 2 and Jobs have respectively gained 4th and 7th place.

Forest WhitakerForest Whitaker and Oprah Winfrey who star in Lee Daniels' The Butler as Cecil and Gloria Gaines at the L.A. premiere.

The Butler has made $25 million in its opening weekend and has gained critical praise. The historical epic is inspired by the true story of Cecil Gaines, a black butler who whilst serving at the White House, saw the offices of eight presidents. His life and family form a touchstone for the audience when addressing such historical events as the Civil Rights Movement and the rise of Black Power in the US. 

Continue reading: 'Lee Daniels' The Butler' Beats 'Kick-Ass 2' And 'Jobs' In US Weekend Box Office

Lee Daniels' The Butler Is "Deeply Affecting And Oscar Bait"


Forest Whitaker Oprah Winfrey Alan Rickman Minka Kelly Jane Fonda John Cusack Robin Williams James Marsden

Lee Daniels' The Butler is released today in US cinemas. Early reviews of the historical drama have been mixed although most suggest the film is definitely worth a watch.

Forest Whitaker and Oprah WinfreyForest Whitaker and Oprah Winfrey at the L.A. premiere of The Butler.

The film has been praised by critics for being "both deeply affecting and blatant Oscar bait", according to Claudia Puig of USA Today. Whilst Joe Morgenstern of the Wall Street Journal wrote in his review "fiction merges with fact, and finally soars."

Continue reading: Lee Daniels' The Butler Is "Deeply Affecting And Oscar Bait"

Alan Rickman Wednesday 7th November 2012 Gambit - World Premiere held at The Empire, Leicester Square - Arrivals

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman Wednesday 7th November 2012

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman, World Premiere, Gambit, The Empire, Leicester Square, London and England Wednesday 7th November 2012 London, England

Alan Rickman, World Premiere, Gambit, The Empire, Leicester Square, London and England

Gambit Trailer


Harry Deane is a pretty hopeless British art curator who has suffered years of condescension and disrespect at the hands of his preposterously rich and eccentric boss that is the renowned art collector Lionel Shabandar. Frustrated at his own lack of recognition in the art world, Harry decides to organise an elaborate plot of revenge on his employer by tricking him into buying a seemingly priceless Monet painting that happens to be a fake. As part of his cunning ploy, he travels to the states and meets a stunning, blonde Texas cowgirl who he enlists to help him by posing alongside her grandmother as inheritors of the valuable piece. He takes her to England where Shabandar is immediately taken with her and goes to all lengths to charm her. Harry's affection for Nicole is also growing and his jealousy of the two of them results in more than one embarrassing situations.

This flamboyant crime comedy is a remake of the 1966 Academy Award nominated film of the same name which starred Michael Caine ('The Dark Knight', 'Children of Men') and Shirley MacLaine ('The Apartment', 'Terms of Endearment'). Not only has this 2012 movie also got an all-star cast, it has been written by the multi-Oscar winning writing brothers Ethan Coen and Joel Coen ('No Country for Old Men', 'Fargo', 'True Grit') as well as being directed by Michael Hoffman ('One Fine Day', 'The Emperor's Club'). It's set for release in the UK on November 21st 2012.

Starring: Colin Firth, Cameron Diaz, Alan Rickman, Stanley Tucci, Cloris Leachman, Tom Courtenay, Togo Igawa, Anna Skellern

Alan Rickman Friday 28th September 2012 attends Stanley Tucci and Felicity Blunt's pre-wedding drinks gathering at Shoreditch House

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman Monday 12th December 2011 Special Broadway community advance screening of the TV show 'Smash' held at the Museum of Modern Art. New York City, USA

Alan Rickman

Hamish Linklater and Alan Rickman - Hettienne Park, Hamish Linklater, Alan Rickman, Lily Rabe and Jerry O'Connell New York City, USA - Broadway World Premiere of 'Seminar' at the Golden Theatre - Curtain Call. Sunday 20th November 2011

Hamish Linklater and Alan Rickman
Hamish Linklater and Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman and Gotham Hall Sunday 20th November 2011 After Party for the Broadway World Premiere of 'Seminar' held at Gotham Hall party space. New York City, USA

Alan Rickman and Gotham Hall
Alan Rickman and Gotham Hall
Alan Rickman and Gotham Hall
Alan Rickman and Gotham Hall
Alan Rickman and Gotham Hall
Alan Rickman and Gotham Hall

Alan Rickman Sunday 20th November 2011 Broadway World Premiere of 'Seminar' at the Golden Theatre - Curtain Call. New York City, USA

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Hamish Linklater, Alan Rickman and Theresa Rebeck

Alan Rickman Wednesday 28th September 2011 Photo call for the Broadway production of 'Seminar' at the Foxwoods Theatre rehearsal hall. New York City, USA

Alan Rickman
Theresa Rebeck, Alan Rickman and Hamish Linklater
Alan Rickman
Theresa Rebeck, Alan Rickman and Hamish Linklater
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Review


Excellent

The eight-part saga comes to a close with an action-packed finale that neatly ties up the strands of the whole series and also manages to give its actors some meaty scenes to play with. While it's hugely satisfying, there's also a letdown as we reach the end.

With Voldemort (Fiennes) in possession of the mythical Elder Wand, and four Horcruxes still at large, Harry (Radcliffe) and pals Hermione and Ron (Watson and Grint) know that they have work to do. Breaking into a Gringotts vault is tough enough, but when they sneak back into Hogwarts, they find themselves in all-out war against Voldemort and his Death Eaters. So with the help of adults (Smith, Walters and more) and fellow students (including Lewis, Wright and Lynch), they make their final stand.

After a sort of "Previously on Harry Potter" prologue and a quietly intense opening, the film plunges into the Gringotts heist and barely pauses for breath. Director Yates adeptly juggles action and drama, keeping images razor sharp and making sure the effects work is seamlessly eye-catching (they're also the most consistently high-quality effects in the series). But of course Lord of the Rings-scale spectacle is nothing without great characters, and this film pushes everyone into new territory.

Radcliffe takes on the challenge extremely well, bringing Harry's self-doubt and crippling guilt together with a potent sense of destiny and sacrifice. Of the supporting cast, Rickman, Smith and Gambon get the weightiest scenes, while Lewis and Walters finally have superb moments in the spotlight. And Bonham Carter clearly has a ball with a terrific scene as a shape-shifted Hermione.
Meanwhile, that outrageously starry ensemble fills out each scene, including many who barely utter a word.

As the story propels to the climactic moments, there are a few fits and starts while events recoil and wait to burst forth again. Even though this is the shortest of all eight movies, it feels a little long due to its intensely focussed plot. This means every moment on screen is vitally important, and most are given the chance to play out without feeling rushed. But it also means that, as the ending (and epilogue) get closer, we simply don't want it to end.

Alan Rickman - Alan Rickman, New York City, USA - New York premiere of 'Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2' at Avery Fisher Hall - Arrivals Monday 11th July 2011

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman - Alan Rickman, London, England - Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 - world film premiere held on Trafalgar Square - Arrivals. Thursday 7th July 2011

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman Sunday 3rd July 2011 Wimbledon Men's finals - Outside Arrivals London, England

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman and Midtown Tuesday 1st February 2011 Alan Rickman out and about in snow covered streets in midtown. New York City, USA

Alan Rickman and Midtown
Alan Rickman and Midtown
Alan Rickman and Midtown

Alan Rickman Wednesday 8th December 2010 Opening night after party for the Off-Broadway play 'Haunted' at the 59E59 Theaters. New York City, USA

Alan Rickman
Niall Buggy and Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review


Excellent

Cranking up the action and emotion, JK Rowling's Harry Potter saga moves into the first half of its extended grand finale. It's a relatively harrowing film punctuated by real violence, and it cleverly starts weaving together both the plot and the relationships.

After the tragic events of the previous school year, Harry (Radcliffe) and his pals Ron and Hermoine (Grint and Watson) know that they can't go back to normal. Instead, they're on the run from Voldemort (Fiennes) and his fearsome Death Eaters. They also have an overwhelming task: collecting the horcruxes that Voldemort has hidden to ensure his immortality. But where to look? And when they find one, how do they destroy it? Then a rebel journalist (Ifans) tells them the story of the Deathly Hallows, which makes their quest even more urgent.

The plot has a very different structure, as our three heroes are propelled by startling events into increasingly uncertain situations. Persistently chased by the bad guys and unable to trust anyone, they are profoundly alone and constantly in danger. We strongly feel their lonely desperation all the way through the film, so when another nasty thing happens to push them further along, it's genuinely unsettling.

Although it feels far too long, Yates and Kloves thankfully mix the dark drama with lighter comedy, allowing the characters to grow organically. Over seven films the story has grown increasingly gloomy but, despite the relentless anxiety, this chapter has an insistent pace, which is helpful since pretty nightmarish things are happening. There's also some subtext in the political storyline, as the villains seize control first of the media and then the government.

By now, the three central actors have settled solidly into their roles, adding subtle edges in every scene. Intriguingly, Grint has emerged as the most complex performer, but all three are excellent. And the who's who of British acting talent around them is fantastic. Stand-outs this time are Nighy (as a slippery politician), Isaacs (as a disgraced baddie) and Mullan (as a vicious security guy). But several others get a chance to shine as well, and of course there's a lot more action to come in Part 2.

Alan Rickman - Thursday 25th February 2010 at Odeon Leicester Square London, England

Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman

Alice In Wonderland Trailer


Watch the trailer for Alice In Wonderland

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Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince Review


Very Good
Darker and a whole lot drearier, this sixth Harry Potter adventure centres on a slow-developing mystery, and the filmmakers clearly struggle to give it much pace. It's well-made and watchable, but feels like an intake of breath before the frantic finale.

After the horrific conclusion of their fifth year at Hogwarts, Harry (Radcliffe) has a solitary summer before being drafted by headmaster Dumbledore (Gambon) into the ongoing war between the wizarding forces of light and darkness. And as year six starts, Dumbledore assigns Harry to get some important information from new potions professor Slughorn (Broadbent) about the Dark Lord's background. He of course does this with the help of pals Ron and Hermione (Grint and Watson), who with Harry are also caught up in conflict more typical for 17-year-olds: raging hormones.

Continue reading: Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince Review

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince - Trailer & Featurette


Watch the trailer for Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Continue: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince - Trailer & Featurette

Nobel Son Review


OK
Plot is a funny thing. Not enough, and audiences will nod off. Too much, however, and you run the risk of confusing the viewer. For the most part, overly complicated films are viewed as arrogant by the majority of the mainstream. They tend to play like convoluted explanations for ideas that are basic, or simply clichéd. After showing us how Napa Valley won the war of the grape in this summer's Bottle Shock, Randall Miller is seeing his 2007 satiric thriller Nobel Son get a "better late then never" awards season push. Yet it's hard to see who will enjoy this catawampus creation. More often than not, Miller appears to be playing to the audience in his head, not the jaded Joe Six-Packs in the actual theater seats.

On the day he leaves for Sweden to pick up his Nobel Prize in chemistry, Dr. Eli Michaelson (Alan Rickman) finds out that his PhD-candidate son Barkley (Bryan Greenberg) has been kidnapped. While his FBI forensics psychologist wife Sarah (Mary Steenburgen) worries, a $2 million ransom is demanded. With the help of Detective Max Mariner (Bill Pullman), and neurotic neighbor Mr. Gastner (Danny Devito), they hope to find the boy alive. What they don't know is that Barkley has befriended his captor, a man named Thaddeus James (Shawn Hatosy) who has a DNA-sized bone to pick with the good doctor. Armed with proof that Michaelson doesn't deserve science's highest honor, the duo will create an elaborate plot to get the cash, clear up the crime, and go their separate ways. So imagine Barkley's surprise when Thaddeus ends up at his front door, with former, improbably-named fling City Hall (Eliza Dushku) on his arm.

Continue reading: Nobel Son Review

Alan Rickman Monday 20th October 2008 The Times BFI London Film Festival: 'Rachel Getting Married' at the Vue West End - Arrivals London, England

Alan Rickman

Bottle Shock Review


Good
Though it's hard to believe, over 30 years ago, wines from continents other than Europe (and countries other than France and Italy) were considered crap. Not less palatable or uncertain in quality: Boone's Farm meets Thunderbird. Uncivilized swill. Of course, this wasn't true. Napa Valley, as well as regions in Australia, were creating wonderful vintages. But since the French controlled everything about the culture of the grape, their disdain meant no one took outsider vineyards seriously.

In 1976, all that changed. During the year of America's Bicentennial, a British merchant working in Paris came to California looking for participants for his exclusive tasting competition. He hoped to raise awareness of his failing shop and solidify his place in the snobbish wine society. Instead, winemonger Stephen Spurrier made history, and his accidental discoveries sent international palettes into something akin to Bottle Shock. Now, decades since the U.S. became part of cultured world cuisine, director Randall Miller offers up a serio-comic take on the event, and for the most part, it's as tasty as a well-aged Burgundy.

Continue reading: Bottle Shock Review

Sweeney Todd The Demon Barber of Fleet Street Trailer


Sweeney Todd The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
Trailer

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Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Trailer


Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Trailer

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Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire Review


Excellent

For the uninitiated, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was the book where author J.K. Rowling finally went off her rocker, turning out a 734-page monster of a book (vs. 309 pages for #1) that made everyone wonder if any child could possibly have that kind of attention span.

Turns out they did: Book four is also where Rowling went from Big Hit to Mega Worldwide Sensation, and the Harry Potter series became a cultural touchstone. (This is also about the time that ultra-right wing groups started denouncing the series as demonic.)

And so, everything that is past is prologue: The first three films now feel like nothing more than window dressing for this one, a rich movie with expert plotting, clever humor, and a sophistication lacking in the earlier pictures. At the same time, it's fine for (older) kids, who'll root for Harry and Co. through his many scrapes in this edition.

Goblet of Fire finds Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) back for his fourth year at Hogwarts Academy. Things are getting heavier for the lad: He's having vivid dreams about Lord Voldemort being revived in the flesh. On top of that, the school is hosting the legendary Tri-Wizard Tournament, in which three aspiring magicians will compete to win a fancy blue cup (plus bragging rights), which brings two foreign schools -- one a collection of brutish Russian guys, another a group of breathless French fairy queens -- into Hogwarts for the term. While the tournament is meant for older kids, naturally the undersized Potter will find his way into the mix. On top of that, Harry's got some raging hormones, which has him swooning for fellow student Cho (Katie Leung), while Ron (Rupert Grint) tries in vain to suppress his budding love for Hermione (Emma Watson). This comes to a head of sorts during a formal dance, one of the film's most memorable scenes. And all the while, Voldemort inches closer to Harry.

Overall, the story is obviously and dramatically pared down from the book. Even I, a non-reader, could tell that there were huge gaps in the plot. Strangely, it doesn't really matter. All but the bare essentials have been stripped away, and even though it tops 2 1/2 hours, Goblet is a lean, mean, storytelling machine. There's rarely a dull moment (a stark contrast to some of the overblown earlier installments in the series), and it's amazingly easy to follow the serpentine plot. Partly this is because we've had three movies to get up to speed on the myriad characters of Potter, and even though Goblet introduces a good number of new faces, keeping track of them is a snap. The downside of this is that, aside from a little romance for the main three characters, there's not much time to develop our heroes further. But really, it isn't needed. They're fleshy enough as it is, and the film does give them a bit more structure to set up #5.

Speculation has been rampant about how director Mike Newell -- of Four Weddings and a Funeral fame -- would work out as the helmer of an action-oriented kid flick. Turns out, he's better than those who came before him. Not only does Newell have a good handle over the film's action showpieces, he knows how to deal with awkward romances and growing pains of the teen years. Maybe it's because he's the first British director to try his hand at this very British series?

Speaking of the action: The special effects in this installment are hands-down better than ever. There's probably not a single scene in Goblet of Fire that isn't manipulated with CGI in some way -- but you'll never notice. The effects are so good and so seamless that you seriously can't tell the difference (reality-wise) between Radcliffe and the giant, fire-breathing dragon staring him down.

And speaking of dragons: The film is scary, more so than the other three. As a case in point, the woman sitting in front of me, with two kids aged about six to eight, had to leave the theater after the first two minutes because the little ones were so frightened.

Altogether the film is just about right for what a Harry Potter movie ought to be. The story is consistently interesting but not too confusing, the dialogue is spot-on, and the film blends action and quiet moments perfectly. (Frankly, the film should win an Oscar for editing.)

But overall Goblet of Fire has succeeded in doing one big thing that the first three movies completely failed at: For the first time, I'm actually looking forward to the next in the series.

A little magic ought to fix that arm right up, no?

Mesmer Review


Weak
Fantastic! The best movie I've ever seen! This portrayal of 1800s hypnotist Franz Anton Mesmer is killer! Alan Rickman is fantastic, whispering those lines with self-assured grace. He wasn't a wacko -- his strange energy experiments were legit! He got a bum rap! Costumes! Drama! It's... it's... it's incredible!

Continue reading: Mesmer Review

Dogma Review


Good
That's it. Kevin Smith is going to Hell. Big Hell, with a capital H.

In Dogma, Smith's long-awaited and already vilified indictment of the Catholic church, the auteur has gone to great lengths to show us he can take on any establishment and gut it wide open. To wit:

Continue reading: Dogma Review

An Awfully Big Adventure Review


Good
Georgina Cates, what has become of you?

In the year 1995 and at the age of 20, the fair-skinned redhead had what was arguably her biggest and most noteworthy role in An Awfully Big Adventure, then took smaller and smaller roles in smaller and smaller films until vanishing completely from the movies in 1999. (Does a 1997 marriage to Skeet Ulrich have anything to do with it? Who can say.

Continue reading: An Awfully Big Adventure Review

The Winter Guest Review


OK
Extremely chatty, Alan Rickman's directorial debut is long in the tooth and short in everything else. While the photography of a remote Scottish fishing village is to die for, the lack of anything happening in the plot (involving eight natives from kids to the elderly and their various relationships) -- or even much music -- is a real letdown. Most notably disappointing is a shorn Emma Thompson, who spends the first third of the movie in the bathroom. Bo-ring!

Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves Review


Very Good
I have to say that I probably have seen the parody of this film more times than I have seen the movie itself. Somehow, through quirks of fate (namely, a WPST-NJ promotion), I got a free copy of the tape of Robin Hood: Men In Tights and have put up with watching it time after time. So, in the sense of cosmic justice, I figured I should actually watch the movie that spawned the film that has given me so many laughs that it probably didn't deserve.

Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves is yet another example of Hollywood taking a famous story and making it Hollywood-compliant. In other words, the original story is still there in some bizarre form (he robs from the rich and gives to the poor), but we're missing Prince John, and Robin Hood's not speaking in a British accent. I can accept Robin Hood not speaking in a British accent if he happens to also be an animated fox (Disney's version, which took up some of my childhood hours), but when Kevin Costner takes a stab at it I just approach the entire movie from that point on with a sort of incredulity.

Continue reading: Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves Review

The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review


Very Good
Tolkein geeks have The Lord of the Rings. I have The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. One of my most beloved book series as a youth (I still carry a towel in my trunk thanks to its advice), I even sat through (and enjoyed) the cheesy BBC miniseries made from the novels. So just so you know what you're getting into with this review: I'm a self-confessed overgrown fanboy on this one.

Decades in the making, Guide has been embroiled in controversy since the very beginning. The most recent round of complaints have covered pretty much the entire film, from casting (Mos Def taking a role commonly envisioned as a sort of British dandy) to directing (Garth Jennings is a music video veteran), to choice of writer Karey Kirkpatrick (a kiddie flick screenwriter best known for Chicken Run but also the writer of disastrous flicks The Little Vampire and Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves). Out of this, we've all been promised, genius would spring.

Continue reading: The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review

Lumiere And Company Review


Good
A documentary-ish experiment: Give 40 movie directors the world's first movie camera (the Lumiere cinematograph, 1895) and 52 seconds in which to shoot their own mini-film. Some of the directors go all out (David Lynch and some French people I've never heard of)... and some are pathetic, self-ego-massaging wastes of time (particularly Spike Lee, who uses his 52 seconds trying to get his baby to say "Dada"). Also curious is how many directors made movies about making movies (methinks that's all they know any more). But how often can you see 40 films, the making-of story, and an interview with the director, all in an hour and a half? Once in a lifetime is just about enough.

Michael Collins Review


Good
The time between 1916 and the 1920s saw the worst of a revolt that caused the creation the IRA and heightened the fight for independence between Ireland and the crown in London. At the head of this fight, like it or not, was Michael Collins, a demagogue/saboteur/freedom fighter that lived as a hero and died a martyr.

Read it once again -- this is not Braveheart. Braveheart took place something like 600 years earlier, and just a stone's throw across the North Channel, in Scotland.

Continue reading: Michael Collins Review

Sense And Sensibility Review


Excellent
Finally, a film to make Jane Austen proud. The third adaptation of her work this year (the first being Clueless's modernization of Emma; the second, the dreadful Persuasion), first-time screenwriter Emma Thompson and director Ang Lee have crafted a magnificent and exquisitely detailed piece of art which redeems the failures of the other two.

Sense And Sensibility tells the story of the Dashwood family, who, after the death of Mr. Dashwood, lose all their wealth to the son of Mr. Dashwood's prior marriage. The four Dashwood women, the mother and three daughters (Elinor [Emma Thompson], Marianne [Kate Winslet], and young Margaret), must find a way to make ends meet as the elder daughters face the daunting problems of love and romance.

Continue reading: Sense And Sensibility Review

Judas Kiss Review


Good
Intrigue and sexiness mix together in Judas Kiss, just not very well. Carla Gugino, Gil Bellows, Simon Baker, and Til Schweiger make an unlikely band of scam artists-cum-kidnappers, but it's cop partners Alan Rickman and Emma Thompson (both with outrageously bad New Orleans accents) that really make you wonder who the hell cast this thing. Tons of stars, including Hal Holbrook in an exceptionally over-the-top role, make this movie fun but unspectacular.

Quigley Down Under Review


Excellent
I don't know when the law was passed, but action movies are now required to have at least half of their content full of revved up, gravity defying, John Woo influenced kung fu acrobatics. Even classic literature is veering in that direction; witness (in my case, with a pained look) the preview for The Musketeer. It's only a matter of time before Helena Bonham Carter and Ian Holm start running on treetops, bellowing lines from King Lear. Actually, I wouldn't mind seeing that, come to think of it.

With such a glut of over-choreographed action flicks, maybe that's why I was so excited to watch Quigley Down Under, the 1990 cowboy flick starring Tom Selleck and Laura San Giacomo. Directed by Lonesome Dove's Simon Wincer, it's a simple, very entertaining tale. Within the movie's first five minutes, there's a fistfight and everyone adheres to the laws of gravity. That's a good sign.

Continue reading: Quigley Down Under Review

Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban Review


OK

Well folks, it's another year at Hogwarts Academy (two years in real life), and our rapidly maturing stars are back for another round of magical high jinks and mass merchandising in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.

Harry's been absent since the fall of 2002, and even casual viewers will notice that a lot has changed over the last two years. Director Chris Columbus (who did the first two films) is out, replaced with the controversial Alfonso Cuarón, who last hit the scene with the teen sex romp Y Tu Mamá También.

You'll notice Cuarón's touch right away. He likes to pick up the camera and get right in his actor's faces, moving all the while, a stark contrast to Columbus's traditionalism. Gone as well are the rich Technicolor tones of the Columbus movies; Cuarón prefers washed-out, yellowish shading that connotes decay and decrepitude. This is old-school wizardry, not kids stuff. In one fell swoop, Cuarón has reinvented the movies into an arthouse series that's as un-kid friendly as it gets.

How you feel about all of that depends on whether you're old enough to vote. I can't speak for the kids, but I heard more than one crying jag erupt during Azkaban's 150-minute running time. Will young kids relate to this iteration of Potter? Here's the story, you be the judge:

Once again, Harry's living with his cruel aunt and uncle, anxious to return to school. That happens soon enough, and quickly he discovers he's the target of the titular Prisoner of Azkaban, a wizard named Sirius Black who was convicted for killing dozens of people, most notably Harry's parents. Now he's escaped and is making his way toward Hogwarts, ready to snuff young Potter. Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), now a troubled 13-year-old, doesn't seem overly fazed at first. He's up to his usual school antics; taking classes, sneaking out to go to town, dodging Draco. It isn't until Black arrives on the scene for real (well past the midpoint of the movie) that any of this starts to gel into a plot.

And I use that term loosely. I think of myself as an astute follower of stories, but Azkaban can be baffling if you haven't read the book or don't have someone nearby to explain who's who. For those going into this blind, there are soul-sucking dementors (not especially terrifying here), shapeshifting wizards, old friends reunited, and a time travel subplot all coming together into one of the least satisfying dénouements in fantasy movie history. While it's riddled with plot holes (which I won't reveal since they'd spoil the ending), there's no doubt Harry's going to come out of it okay: The last half hour of the movie is rehashed from another angle as we run through the time travel bit, reliving the scenes from another angle.

Azkaban the novel gets mixed reviews from Potter maniacs -- some say it's their favorite book; others say it's the worst. However, if my research is correct, it is the worst-selling of the five books to date, and it will probably go down in history as the worst of the movies, too. (But I've been wrong before, of course.) In any case, by all accounts, the books really get good starting at #4 (due out in movie form next year), while Azkaban is a slim volume where comparably little happens. Ultimately Harry is in virtually no peril compared to that in the first two stories and those that follow. Heck, Voldemort doesn't even show up in this round.

The other notable problem is how radically older the cast has gotten since 2002's Chamber of Secrets. Radcliffe is valiantly fighting off puberty, but Emma Watson (Hermione) is looking her age; she's tarted up in jeans and a rainbow belt for most of the film, and sports a more stylish haircut to boot. Now 15, Rupert Grint (Ron) looks like he ought to be starring in the next American Pie movie as a wacky foreign exchange student. And Tom Felton, who plays Draco, is now 17 years old and ought to be playing rugby in college. He probably is. I couldn't believe it was the same actor.

Speaking of actors, Richard Harris is sorely missed as Dumbledore. I love Michael Gambon, but he doesn't do the kindly old wizard too well. He's got a Robert Mitchum-esque undercoating of villainy that he just can't shake. David Thewlis and Gary Oldman are fine as the new blood, but it's Emma Thompson that steals the show as a doddering divination professor.

The rest of the series remains intact. Twittering ghosts and pictures are as we remember them (Dawn French steals a scene as a portrait of a vain fat lady), the Quidditch match is an abbreviated bust, and Snape (Alan Rickman) is as menacing as ever. But nothing much happens - certainly nothing to enhance any of the characters aside from the tenuous hand-holding of Ron and Hermione - and Azkaban generates very little energy along the way.

I have high hopes that Mike Newell will reinvigorate the series with next year's Goblet of Fire (how it will clock in at less than 8 hours I have no idea), but I can't recommend Azkaban for anyone but die-hard Potter heads.

The DVD is just the thing for those Potterphiles, including two discs of extras, such as bonus footage, cast interviews, and games for the kids.

Wand by Hogwarts. Jeans by Guess.

Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone Review


Very Good

When you're the chosen one, like the boy wizard Harry Potter, expectations surrounding your arrival can be quite high. The same can be said for the film adaptation about said boy wizard, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. And while the young wonder might not let his magic school chums down, the movie chronicling his early wizard years could use a little lift.

Which isn't to say that Sorcerer's Stone, the first Harry Potter movie based on J.K. Rowling's inexplicably successful book series, is a boring movie. In fact, Rowling's exceptional world, involving young magic makers at a British wizardry prep school, transfers to the screen with a general creativity and charm in the hands of director Chris Columbus. The author's Cinderella-esque tale of a boy who gets invited to the most magical ball of them all, kicks off with a classic sensibility, almost like a modern Dickens.

From there, getting to the celebrated Hogwarts School is a treat, as Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) and the rest of the incoming first-years (including Rupert Grint as Ron Weasley and Emma Watson as Hermione Granger) buy the proper wizard tools, find the elusive Track 9 3/4 at the train station, and travel in boats by moonlight to the gothic center of higher learning. Columbus weaves the special effects so smoothly into the narrative as to make the magic nearly matter-of-fact.

But after we get the general gist of life at Hogwarts, Sorcerer's Stone loses some of its sheen. The collection of characters to which we're introduced early -- Maggie Smith as Professor McGonagall; Alan Rickman as the eerie Professor Snape; the delightful Robbie Coltrane as Rubeus Hagrid -- aren't utilized well enough to provide the necessary oomph. They're stuck within Steve Kloves' (Wonder Boys) light, thin plot, with their roles eventually reduced to side characters, comic relief, or vague red herrings.

And the flatness of the narrative goes hand-in-hand with some of Sorcerer's Stone look as well. Save for a couple of sequences, Columbus just doesn't provide enough visual wow for such magical subject matter. I know that some of the action is meant to be dark, but the overall look of the movie doesn't have the punch that the on-screen activity demands. In the end, there are too many missed opportunities for maximum thrills.

A prime exception is the truly wonderful centerpiece of the film, a prep school Quidditch match. For the uninitiated, Quidditch is a soccer style game played completely in mid-air, with players on broomsticks. Picture a combination of The Wizard of Oz and Rollerball.

Columbus' take on this game is superb. There's speedy action, seamless effects, and some thrilling excitement. The design of the match provides a wonderful combination of visual styles, with mid-20th century prep school clothes amidst medieval set design. The scene is, by far, the highlight of the film, much as the pod race was in Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (oddly enough, another somewhat disappointing movie about a chosen boy).

But once we get back to the tale of our trio of little wizards, the plodding plot returns. And unfortunately, Radcliffe, as our hero, doesn't seem too enthused by much of the wild goings-on. His school cronies, on the other hand, are just great -- Grint, as Ronald, is wide-eyed and sympathetic, and Watson, as the precocious Hermione, is smart and energetic, taking a bigger bite out of this movie than any other actor.

While Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone does score points by giving visuals to some wildly fantastic stuff, the total picture lacks polish, and feels like a mild setup to future movies. Similar to X-Men, we get an environment being introduced just for the sake of future movies. That creates anticipation among fans, but shortchanges those watching this one.

The release of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone coincides with another Harry Potter milestone -- the beginning of production on Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, scheduled to hit theaters in mid-November, 2002. Stone is already expected to break box office records, including a possible run at Titanic (highly unlikely, if you ask me). That means there's one thing Warner Brothers will be saying about young Harry for the foreseeable future... long live The Boy Who Lived.

Harry Potter's DVD is as inexplicable as it is ambitious. An enormous two-disc set, the DVD promises tantalizing "never before seen footage," but good luck trying to find it. Disc one is the standard movie, and disc two amounts to what is best described as an intricate game for kids. It's all designed as a puzzle -- to do anything you have to twist the right bricks to gain access, just like Harry and Hagrid did in London. If you didn't memorize the pattern, you'll have to go back to the movie (swapping discs in the process -- though if you screw up enough times, the game will eventually show you the answer). To open more and more of the disc you have to complete more and more idiotic tasks -- picking a wand, mixing potions, and the like. I gave up after half an hour of this nonsense, having exposed little more than a collection of interview clips. Warner Brothers: I appreciate that you've tried to do something beyond the usual with this highly anticipated release, but for us adults, give us a back door to the special features. We just don't have time for this Hogwarts -- I mean, hogwash.

School's in session.

The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review


Good
Imagine the madcap sensibilities of Monty Python appliedto science fiction and you'll begin to have an inkling of the whimsicallyeccentric humor of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," anenormously successful cult-comedy franchise of which a new feature filmis only the latest incarnation.

The story of Arthur Dent (Martin Freeman), a nebbish Englishmansaved from the demolition of Earth (to make way for a hyperspace bypass)by an alien he'd hitherto thought was a pal from Gilford, "Hitchhiker'sGuide" follows his very reluctant and frequently absurd adventuresin space.

In the first 15 minutes alone, Arthur and Ford Prefect(Mos Def) are jettisoned from one of the ships that blew up the Earth (afterbeaming aboard surreptitiously, being captured and tortured with alienpoetry), then against all odds they're rescued from the vacuum of spaceseconds later by a passing vessel with a warp drive designed to exploitjust such unlikelihoods -- the Infinite Improbability Drive.

Onboard Arthur is improbably reunited with Trish McMillan(Zooey Deschanel), a girl he fell for at a party some months before, onlyto see her run off with Zaphod Bebblebox (Sam Rockwell), a guy who claimedto be from another planet. Zaphod, even more improbably, turns out to beFord's whacked-out semi-cousin (they share three of the same mothers) whobecame president of the galaxy just so he'd have the necessary clearanceto steal this very ship (because he thought it was cool).

Continue reading: The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review

Love Actually Review


OK

"Love Actually" is terminally precious. Chirpy "classic" pop songs populate every third scene. It has no structure, just a jumble of interconnected stories -- some little dramas, some little comedies -- about love, flirtation, courtship and heartbreak, all of which will pay off just in time for a lovely London Christmas.

It's the kind of pandering, populist movie in which Hugh Grant, playing the prime minister of England, joyously shakes his booty to The Pointer Sisters' "Jump (For My Love)" until he suddenly, to his great embarrassment, realizes he's being watched. It offers no real surprises except in how and when it reveals the inevitable six degrees of separation between each anecdotal yarn -- none of which has enough substance to ever stand on its own (nor would you want them to!).

And yet, you'd have to be a terrible grump to not like "Love Actually" at least a little.

Continue reading: Love Actually Review

Galaxy Quest Review


Weak

"Galaxy Quest" was birthed from a ripe comedy premise: The leaders of a tyrannized race of pacifist aliens watching TV signals from Earth mistake the cast of a cult status science fiction show for real space adventurers and spirit them away to help save their planet.

It's "Three Amigos" with a tongue-in-cheek "Star Trek" twist and -- at first, anyway -- a pitch-perfect tone of benevolent mockery.

Clad in faux-futuristic Neoprene jumpsuits and sporting bowl-cut hair dos that would embarrass Mr. Spock, the clueless aliens with halcyon smirks, waddling walks and a nasal, monotone vocabulary are themselves mistaken for autograph-hunting geeks when they invade a sci-fi convention to recruit the "crew" of the illustrious fictional spaceship, the NESA Protector.

Continue reading: Galaxy Quest Review

Alan Rickman

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Alan Rickman

Date of birth

21st February, 1946

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.85


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Alan Rickman Movies

Alice Through the Looking Glass Movie Review

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Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass Trailer

As Alice is once again taken into the magical and mysterious world that she's somehow...

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Eye In The Sky Trailer

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A Little Chaos Movie Review

A Little Chaos Movie Review

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A Promise Movie Review

A Promise Movie Review

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The Butler Movie Review

The Butler Movie Review

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The Butler Trailer

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