Sarah Polley Page 2

Sarah Polley

Sarah Polley Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS

A Week In Movies: Star Wars Episode VII Shapes Up, Harrison Ford Joins Anchorman: The Legend Continues And Oz The Great And Powerful Hits Theatres


Carrie Fisher Harrison Ford Will Ferrell James Franco Mila Kunis Michelle Williams Rachel Weisz Robert Downey Jr Ben Kingsley Richard Dormer Julianne Moore Steve Coogan Sarah Polley

Star Wars

The movie casting rumour mill has gone into overdrive this week when Carrie Fisher seemed to confirm that she will indeed be back for Star Wars Episode VII. And then George Lucas chimed in to say that all three stars - Fisher, Harrison Ford and Mark Hamill - are on board to reprise their iconic characters 30 years after 1983's Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. Nothing is official yet, but we can probably expect a big announcement soon.

Meanwhile, Ford has joined the cast of the comedy sequel Anchorman: The Legend Continues, which is currently filming with Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd and Christina Applegate. And Halle Berry has officially rejoined the X-men for Days of Future Past, along with her original trilogy costars Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman and Anna Paquin, plus the cast of First Class.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Star Wars Episode VII Shapes Up, Harrison Ford Joins Anchorman: The Legend Continues And Oz The Great And Powerful Hits Theatres

Take This Waltz Trailer


When Margot and Daniel meet on a plane, they have an immediate connection; their chemistry is intense and they can't shake off the feeling that they've met before. This movies isn't your ten a penny love story though as Margot is happily married to Lou, a cookbook writer. However when it turns out that rickshaw driver Daniel lives on the same street as the happy couple and begins to regularly pop up in Margot's daily routine when back home, their intensity blossoms and throws the certainty of Margot and Lou's domestic life into question. Call it destiny, whimsy or coincidence; the two begin to lust for one another more and more after their aeronautical meeting and this love triangle becomes an extremely passionate affair.

Continue: Take This Waltz Trailer

Splice Review


Excellent
Sleek and scary, this bio-thriller has plenty of yuckiness to keep genre fans happy, but it layers in all kinds of interesting themes and character details to lift it far above most of these films. And the terrific cast helps as well.

Clive and Elsa (Brody and Polley) are biochemists working for a monolithic pharmaceutical corporation, splicing together animal DNA to find proteins that can treat diseases. When their latest experiment successfully produces Fred and Ginger, a pair of living creatures in a new blob-like species, the company boss (Maicanescu) tells them to now focus on finding something that will make money.

But Elsa continues in secret to create a human hybrid, despite Clive's moral hesitation. Keeping a project like this secret isn't easy, but containing it proves to be the real challenge.

Continue reading: Splice Review

Splice Trailer


Clive and Elsa are young and motivated scientists, they work in the field of genetic engineering and their latest project is one of the most ambitious assignments anyone has ever faced. Financed by a private pharmaceutical company their plan is to create a new animal hybrid, an idea the couple feel will be a successful project; when they approach asking to further the project by combining animal and human DNA they are turned down.

Continue: Splice Trailer

Sarah Polley - Sarah Polley arrives at her hotel Toronto, Canada - during the 2009 Toronto Film festival Thursday 17th September 2009

Sarah Polley
Sarah Polley

Sarah Polley - Sunday 6th January 2008 at New York Film Critic's Circle Awards New York City, USA

Sarah Polley
Sarah Polley
Sarah Polley
Sarah Polley

Olympia Dukakis and Sarah Polley - Olympia Dukakis and Sarah Polley Sunday 6th January 2008 at New York Film Critic's Circle Awards New York City, USA

Olympia Dukakis and Sarah Polley
Olympia Dukakis and Sarah Polley
Olympia Dukakis, Stephen Whitty and Sarah Polley

Away From Her Review


Good
The act of being forgotten becomes pop-Bergman fair in Sarah Polley's Away from Her. If Polley's name rings a few bells, its because she was a rather prominent ingénue of independent cinema in the early '00s, her range swinging from Doug Liman's rollicking Go to Atom Egoyan's solemn, sublime The Sweet Hereafter. Here, director Egoyan serves as executive producer and gives the floor to Polley as she translates Alice Munro's short story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" to the screen.

Fiona (Julie Christie) has begun to lose her memory as an effect of Alzheimer's. Grant (Gordon Pinsent), her husband, can only sigh heavily as he watches her slip away; at one point, she puts a frying pan in the freezer. Begrudgingly, Grant signs Fiona into a home for people with Alzheimer's and other diseases incurred through aging. There's a catch: He can't see her for a month, allowing her to settle in without any debilitations. He returns to find Fiona's memory thickly veiled, only remembering him as a figure without nuance. It also happens that Fiona has become cozy with a catatonic, wheelchair-bound man named Aubrey (Michael Murphy). While attempting to get his wife to remember him, Grant makes time to visit with Aubrey's wife Marian (a fantastic Olympia Dukakis) to see what her side is like.

Continue reading: Away From Her Review

Don't Come Knocking Review


Very Good
In 1984 indie director Wim Wenders and acclaimed writer and actor Sam Shepard collaborated on the film Paris, Texas, a moderately enjoyable character study about a damaged man trying to come to terms with his past. More than two decades later, Wenders and Shepard have teamed up again in Don't Come Knocking and the results are remarkably similar.

Howard Spence (Shepard) is an aging movie star, famous for his roles in westerns, whose life has disintegrated into a boozy, narcotic haze. In the opening scene Howard steals a horse from the set of the movie he's working on and takes off through the desert with no particular destination in mind. Much like Harry Dean Stanton's character in Paris, Texas, Howard simply wakes up one morning and abandons his life.

Continue reading: Don't Come Knocking Review

Beowulf & Grendel Review


OK
Everyone loves a badass. A shit kicker. A name taker. By all accounts the very first badass in Western culture was Beowulf -- a bearded berserker as much at home wrestling with sea serpents as he was brawling with towering giants. He met his match in the form of Grendel, a monster that ravaged the countryside and split men limb from limb. Their clash echoes down to us as the archetypal battle in its most primal form: Man versus monster. Order versus chaos. Good versus evil.

The new film Beowulf & Grendel is an attempt to demythologize the battle between these two mythic beings. Here Beowulf (Gerard Butler) is no badass; he's entirely human and very flawed. He's not the unstoppable warrior from the legends but a somewhat skilled and at times very lucky soldier. And Grendel is not the misshapen monster but a lonely Neanderthal with a grudge against mankind. As played by Ingvar Sigurdsson, he's sympathetic (and very hairy) lout. When he's not shouting with rage into the inexplicable heavens, he's bowling with skulls. The title is a dead give away that this isn't going to be your granddad's Beowulf story. The fact that it's "and" and not "versus" means that Beowulf & Grendel has an agenda, and in tune with contemporary mores this agenda involves demonstrating how both Beowulf and Grendel are outsiders. Beowulf isn't really that good and Grendel's just misunderstood. (This is all explained, naturally, by a sexy but socially conscious witch, Selma, herself an outcast, played by the incredibly miscast Sarah Polley (Go).)

Continue reading: Beowulf & Grendel Review

The Secret Life Of Words Review


Weak

The electro-jazz two-step that plays as the credits roll over the beginning of Isabel Coixet's The Secret Life of Words is terribly misleading, as is most of the music that is used in the film: David Byrne, Blood, Sweat & Tears, and Portuguese pop. The only song that fits in fact, besides the small bursts of wind instruments and opera, is Antony and the Johnson's harrowing "Hope There's Someone," a song so morose, moody, and beautiful that when it's used, my attention strained more to it than of Coixet's images. There's a reason for that.

Josef (Tim Robbins) lies on a bed, blinded and scarred by a fire that killed his best friend on the oil rig they both worked on. Hanna (Sarah Polley), on forced vacation from her warehouse work employer, quickly takes a temporary position as his nurse, doing anything to stay in some sort of routine. She starts out isolated and completely silent but she soon befriends the men on the oil rig while tending to the charming but haunted Josef. She talks about food and jokes with Simon the chef (Javier Cámara) and talks about waves and the sea with the nervy Martin (Daniel Mays). However, she doesn't really reveal herself to anyone but Josef, and most of the film is made up of conversations between them. When it becomes obvious that Josef needs more serious work, Hanna spends a last night with him, telling him about why she is so reserved and regulated. Josef gets better and attempts to reconnect with Hanna through her counselor (Julie Christie) and sees if they might have something real between them.

Continue reading: The Secret Life Of Words Review

The Secret Life Of Words Review


Weak
The electro-jazz two-step that plays as the credits roll over the beginning of Isabel Coixet's The Secret Life of Words is terribly misleading, as is most of the music that is used in the film: David Byrne, Blood, Sweat & Tears, and Portuguese pop. The only song that fits in fact, besides the small bursts of wind instruments and opera, is Antony and the Johnson's harrowing "Hope There's Someone," a song so morose, moody, and beautiful that when it's used, my attention strained more to it than of Coixet's images. There's a reason for that.

Josef (Tim Robbins) lies on a bed, blinded and scarred by a fire that killed his best friend on the oil rig they both worked on. Hanna (Sarah Polley), on forced vacation from her warehouse work employer, quickly takes a temporary position as his nurse, doing anything to stay in some sort of routine. She starts out isolated and completely silent but she soon befriends the men on the oil rig while tending to the charming but haunted Josef. She talks about food and jokes with Simon the chef (Javier Cámara) and talks about waves and the sea with the nervy Martin (Daniel Mays). However, she doesn't really reveal herself to anyone but Josef, and most of the film is made up of conversations between them. When it becomes obvious that Josef needs more serious work, Hanna spends a last night with him, telling him about why she is so reserved and regulated. Josef gets better and attempts to reconnect with Hanna through her counselor (Julie Christie) and sees if they might have something real between them.

Continue reading: The Secret Life Of Words Review

The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen Review


Good
Before he made The Brothers Grimm, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen was arguably Terry Gilliam's least popular film. The story is slow to start, takes too long to finish, and meanders almost irredeemably until finally paying off in the end. The story is adapted from the "tall tale" book of the same name, which gives us a self-proclaimed baron (John Neville in a career-defining role) who regales anyone who'll listen with story after story, each more absurd than the last. The highlight is the film's first major storytelling sequence, a flashback that involves Munchausen and his band of misfits trying to win a bet -- and doing so in amazing style. But so much of the film is so irrelevant that these feel like huge highlights lost in a sea of mediocrity and bad editing.

The Claim Review


Good
In the vein of Unforgiven comes this moody western about another small town in the middle of nowhere, struggling with its place in a world quickly passing it by.

Central to the story is Daniel Dillon (Peter Mullan), mayor of the town of Kingdom Come, Nevada, located on the spot of the gold claim he struck during the 1849 gold rush, some 20 years earlier. Or so we are led to believe. As it turns out, Dillon's claim was given to him in trade -- in trade for his wife and daughter, sold as if they were slaves.

Continue reading: The Claim Review

Last Night Review


Very Good
It's six hours until the end of the world, and Bruce Willis, Robert Duvall, and Will Smith are nowhere in sight. The world is really gonna end -- so what do you do with those six hours?

I rarely read film production notes, but writer/director/star Don McKellar's introduction to Last Night caught my eye this time. I quote, "The world is ending, once again. But this time, in my movie, there is no overburdened loner duking it out with the asteroid, no presidents or generals turning the tables on extra-terrestrials. Those heroes are out there, somewhere, one hopes, but I was interested in the rest of us suckers--hapless individuals who, with limited access to nuclear resources, would have to come to terms with the fast-approaching finale."

Continue reading: Last Night Review

The Sweet Hereafter Review


Excellent
It's been over two years since Canadian auteur Atom Egoyan first came to my attention with his breakthrough film Exotica. Since then, I've become something of an aficionado of his works through home video, and it was with breathless anticipation that I awaited what was sure to be the movie that pushed him into the mainstream: The Sweet Hereafter.

Maybe I over-hyped it in my mind, becoming too hopeful in the face of overwhelming praise for the film. Or maybe I know Egoyan's tricks too well by now. Either way, I left the film extremely pleased but depressed: partly because the movie is such a downer, and partly because I know Egoyan can do even better.

Continue reading: The Sweet Hereafter Review

Go Review


Essential
Believe it or not, this is a Christmas movie! And here it is, the middle of April, and there's nothing else I'd rather see.

Let me put it this way: Go is the best movie I've seen since Fargo. Doug Liman, the man behind the brilliant Swingers, (which, I realized, came out much too long ago, in 1996), has concocted such a film that I'm almost compelled to pay the whopping $8.50 to see it again.

Continue reading: Go Review

The Life Before This Review


Very Good
Scene 1: Robbers on the run bust into a coffee shop and kill everyone, including themselves. Scenes 2-120: Time rolls back to reveal what happened earlier that day to everyone in the shop, including the robbers. Only the outcome may not be quite the same... Overwrought yet still engaging, this Sliding Doors-esque picture has been done time and time again (no pun intended), but it still manages to keep a certain level of charm. Thanks to a lot of really good actors like Polley, Rea, and O'Hara, The Life Before This is a bit more than just a gimmick.

Siblings Review


Good
Killing your parents and covering it up? Sounds like black comedy hour, and this Canadian production generally pays off its promise of Grand Guignol humor despite a rickety production that doesn't quite know when to quit.

The four titular siblings are the progeny of two proverbially awful parents, both of whom have been remarried so much that none of the siblings are actually related by blood. When one of the siblings decides to tinker with the brakes on mom and dad's car, the wicked stepparents end up dead in a ravine. They coolly try to cover up the crime (er, incident), only to end up deeper and deeper in their manufactured morass.

Continue reading: Siblings Review

The Event Review


Bad
Who wouldn't want to have a party before they died? In The Event, Matt Shapiro (Don McKellar), a talented young cello player dying of AIDS, decides to do just that before having his friends and family help him to kill himself. Everyone gets together, blasts music, has champagne, and twirls under the disco ball, wishing Matt a fond farewell into the afterlife. This is all well and good until district attorney Nick (Parker Posey) starts nosing into Matt's death, noting that several of the recently dead people who were under the care of AIDS clinic worker, and Matt's friend, Brian (Brent Carver), died with unusually high amounts of drugs in their system.

Although director and co-writer Thom Fitzgerald sets us up for a mystery at the beginning of the film - Who is Matt? Did he commit suicide? What will Nick find? - the story quickly derails into an extremely sappy and self-indulgent amble through Matt's life, which didn't seem to be terribly interesting. We are given hardly anything of Matt prior to his disease, he is only presented as an AIDS victim, and one particularly prone to flights of self-pity. While The Event is refreshingly candid about many of the particulars of the disease, resisting the melodramatic impulse to keep the more physically unpleasant aspects of it hidden away, it is much less honest and forthcoming about Matt's relationships.

Continue reading: The Event Review

Guinevere Review


Very Good
A curious May-December romance involving a bohemian San Francisco photographer (Rea) who builds a kind of teacher-lover-father-figure relationship with the far-younger Harper (Polley), whom he dubs Guinevere. Think of it as The Professional without all the killing. Turns out our shutterbug has a history of Guineveres, and soon his teeth are falling out and he's dying, and suffice it to say this is where the movie turns bizarre. Poetic, if not altogether meaningful. Jean Smart is particularly apt as Harper's prissy and snobbish mother.

The Weight Of Water Review


Weak
Like Possession, The Weight of Water tries to tie together a period romance and a modern-day one, held together by ancient letters calling out from the past. Like Possession, this fails to work well, as the link between now and then is relatively meaningless.

In the present day, our heroine (the dour Catherine McCormack) asks her brother (Josh Lucas) to sail her to an island off the coast of New Hampshire in order to take pictures of the site of an ancient murder for some photography assignment. Already dubious (I've seen few magazine spreads that feature only grass and rocks), the story gets iffier when her "famous poet" husband (Sean Penn) and bro's girlfriend (Elizabeth Hurley) tag along on the trip.

Continue reading: The Weight Of Water Review

Exotica Review


Essential
Exotica is a new dramatic thriller from Canadian director Atom Egoyan, who brings us this fascinating glimpse into the life of Francis Brown (Bruce Greenwood), a Canadian tax auditor whose life intertwines with a his brother and niece, an exotic animal smuggler, and, most importantly, the denizens of a strip joint called Exotica.

The action in Exotica jumps from one character to another, from location to location, and back into Brown's past occasionally, teasing the viewer with bits of information about how these people's lives are eventually going to gel into a cohesive story. As the story progresses, there are plenty of blanks left for the viewer to fill in as the action springs around. The seamless editing makes this seem natural, albeit a bit overdone at times, but eventually it all comes together to make perfect sense in the end.

Continue reading: Exotica Review

Sarah Polley

Sarah Polley Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Advertisement
Advertisement

Sarah Polley Movies

Stories We Tell Movie Review

Stories We Tell Movie Review

With Away From Her and Take This Waltz, actress-turned-filmmaker Polley has proved herself as an...

Stories We Tell Trailer

Stories We Tell Trailer

Sarah Polley is an actress and film director from a family full of secrets. With...

Advertisement
Take This Waltz Movie Review

Take This Waltz Movie Review

After the remarkable Away From Her, actress-turned-filmmaker Polley is back with another bracingly observant drama,...

Take This Waltz Trailer

Take This Waltz Trailer

When Margot and Daniel meet on a plane, they have an immediate connection; their chemistry...

Splice Movie Review

Splice Movie Review

Sleek and scary, this bio-thriller has plenty of yuckiness to keep genre fans happy, but...

Advertisement
Splice Trailer

Splice Trailer

Clive and Elsa are young and motivated scientists, they work in the field of genetic...

Away From Her Movie Review

Away From Her Movie Review

The act of being forgotten becomes pop-Bergman fair in Sarah Polley's Away from Her. If...

The Claim Movie Review

The Claim Movie Review

In the vein of Unforgiven comes this moody western about another small town in the...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.